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Ivory Coast and Rwanda: A tale of different reactions from the international community to African elections

February 6, 2011

by Claude Gatebuke

Ivory Coast election contenders President Laurent Gbagbo (left) and Alassane Quattara share a laugh on election eve, Nov. 27, 2010, in Abidjan. - Photo: Thierry Gouegnon, Reuters
The current crisis in the disputed presidential election results in the Ivory Coast has brought unprecedented attention to the country as the international community mobilizes to resolve the crisis. The level of attention and unified front presented by the international community towards the Ivory Coast political crisis is impressive. The United States, European Union, United Kingdom, France, United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the African Union are all aligned in condemning the outgoing Ivorian president, Laurent Gbagbo, and demanding that he leave the presidency to his opponent and the alleged winner of the November elections, Alassane Ouattara.

So overzealous is the condemnation of Laurent Gbagbo for not relinquishing the presidential seat to his challenger Alasane Ouattara that certain countries and organizations have called for military action in order to install Ouattara. However, the case of Ivory Coast is neither unique in Africa nor to Western democracies. Three years ago in Kenya, a disputed election between then incumbent Mwai Kibaki and his opponent, Raila Odinga, threatened peace in the country. The international community rushed and mediated a power sharing agreement, persuading Raila Odinga – arguably the legitimate winner of the election – to accept being Kibaki’s prime minister.

In the year 2000 a controversial election resulted in George W. Bush becoming president of the United States in a heated battle against former Vice President Al Gore. The final results were ultimately settled through the Supreme Court. Fortunately, no one from the international community threatened military intervention in order to settle an alleged “stolen” election. Moreover, Belgium, another democracy in Western Europe, came to a stalemate in installing a government; they recently set a record in Europe for the longest period spent without a government. However, the international community is not declaring military threats against Belgium to install a government.

Youth supporting Gbagbo rally after the disputed Nov. 28, 2010, runoff election.
In line with undemocratic election processes, Rwanda’s Paul Kagame staged a sham election giving himself 93 percent of the vote in August of 2010. Kagame’s blatant disregard and violation of human rights and the undermining of the democratic process was unconscionable. President Kagame’s regime jailed all viable political opponents during the election process and suspended local language independent media, while an opposition leader was beheaded and a journalist was assassinated after writing a story implicating the government in the attempted assassination of Kayumba Nyamwasa in South Africa, an exiled former Rwandan military officer and President Kagame’s right hand man.

The overwhelming reaction from the international community was consent by silence. Although the Obama administration expressed “concern” over Rwanda’s elections, it is still planning to send nearly a quarter billion dollars in U.S. taxpayer funds to Rwanda in 2011 but is not threatening military intervention to facilitate a democratic Rwanda.

Even more contemptible, shortly after the Rwandan elections, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights released a damning report, the Mapping Exercise Report, about atrocities in the Congo. The report documented the commission of human rights violations in neighboring Congo between 1993 and 2003, including possible genocide. In reacting to the U.N. report, President Kagame threatened to withdraw his “peacekeeping” troops from Sudan.

Rather than publicly condemn the sham elections and the human rights violations and atrocities committed by Kagame’s troops in Congo, the international community obsequiously sent U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon to Rwanda to appease President Kagame’s anger over the Mapping Exercise Report’s findings. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon made the effort even though Kagame has been indicted for war crimes and for the murder of French, Spanish, Rwandan and Congolese people by judges in Spain and France.

Six months after Rwanda’s presidential election, leading opposition contender Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza is in prison, shown here being led from her cell to a recent court hearing, as is Bernard Ntaganda. Both were barred from the ballot by the incumbent president, Paul Kagame.
In Ivory Coast, however, the international community is quick to engage in military intervention that will certainly spill the blood of countless Ivorian civilians in order to force Gbagbo to relinquish power. In contrast, despite the U.N.’s Mapping Exercise Report indicating a possible genocide and two judicial indictments against him and members of his army and cabinet, President Kagame gets coddled by the international community.

The lessons learned from the U.N. Mapping Exercise report show that even with Rwanda and Uganda’s invasion and occupation of Congo in the last 15 years, political issues have not been resolved by war. The predominant results from that conflict have been more than 5 million innocent lives lost, of which 3 million were children under the age of 5, while hundreds of thousands of women were raped and Congo’s resources plundered. The international community should take heed of these ugly lessons and not engage in military solutions in Ivory Coast to resolve a political dispute.

The problem in the Ivory Coast is a political one and requires a political solution. The same international community that coddles war criminals without intervention should not seek brutal military solutions for political disputes as a means to settle election results. Due to regional conflicts and civil wars, West African communities are vulnerable and delicate. War will not only exacerbate the issues, but it will also create new problems for Ivory Cost and the region.

It is highly likely that a military intervention to install one candidate over another as a solution to the crisis could plunge Ivory Coast into civil war. This civil war could have lasting negative impacts and devastation on the region as did the conflicts in neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia. A negotiated solution such as the Kenyan example or the United States’ judicial process are more sensible. The best policy for the international community is to use diplomatic dialogue to resolve the crisis rather than military intervention as a means of installing a winner.

Claude Gatebuke is a Rwandan Genocide and civil war survivor and human rights advocate. He is the executive director and co-founder of African Great Lakes Action Network (AGLAN), an organization focused on justice, peace and prosperity in the African Great Lakes Region, and a member of the African Great Lakes Advocacy Coalition that brings together over a dozen advocacy organizations with a common vision for a peaceful Great Lakes Region of Africa. He is a regular guest at campuses, churches, community organizations and conferences around the U.S. and has appeared on local, national and international radio and television stations. He can be reached at claude.gatebuke@gmail.com.

43 thoughts on “Ivory Coast and Rwanda: A tale of different reactions from the international community to African elections

  1. Gicari Dunia

    Gatebuke
    You are not a human right acticist as you are claiming, but playing politics to pretect and diffend evil. You are surely a sympathzer of 1994 genocide that claimed more than a million of tutsis. stop your lies and riduculous assertions

    Reply
    1. peaceharvey

      In term of number of people killed by either Laurent Gbagbo or Paul Kagame, when you consider Laurent Gbagbo to be evil, what do you consoder General Paul Kagame to be?

      Reply
      1. success

        Rwandans today are safe,calm and proud and are working hard to develop themselves, forming associations, cooperatives and indeed Rwanda is up coming from genocidal ideology to developmental ideology. So my comrade I do not know which ideology you have got.__You need to think and rethink of positivity present in Rwanda than Negativity. you guys speak about your country as people with objectivity Rwanda belongs to all Rwandans, you come back and reconstruct it

        Reply
    2. success

      In fact you are right, how come peo[ple support evil in the name of criticizing the right things,Gatebuke needs to visit developmental zones and change his story because we are used to such fake insult

      Reply
  2. Clement Mutabazi

    Claude,
    Your analysis makes good sense, not only to those Africans still strugling for their freedom and dignity, but also to the Westerner who unkowingly contributed to genocide and oppression ot the people they believed they were helping. Unfortunately, the majority of those sacrificing for the welfare of the people in third World do not know that money they forego is chanelled to tyrans and dictators who are not even ashamed of tormenting their constituencies in the face of financial sponsors. This the case for Kagame of Rwanda, who after supervising the genocide of Tutsi went on to carry out a genocide of Hutus in both Rwanda and Congo. Despite his evil actions, the US and UK have continue to provide financial and military assistance, which make Kagame the second African beneficiary of US foreign aid. Should the American axpayers know that their money has been used to kill 6 millions and more people in the African Great Lake regions, someone would have to provide exolanation.
    I do think that African are tired of blood shed that resorting to war to intronize winner of election is unwarranted for them. It would even undermine the legitimacy of the newly elected leader.

    Reply
    1. success

      Rwanda is actually the land of Milk and Honey that you can never get elsewhere
      From how it was before,during, and after genocide, Man I salute President Kagame and People of Rwanda to have made it beautful today. When Justice plays its role the guilty creates stories, lets talk about what should you and me do to develop Rwanda than it is today than keeping on giving hand to genocide supporters who have nothing to do but plant evil

      Reply
      1. the messenger

        Its not only about economy!!!We are talking about Human rights just in case you don't understand!!so bring arguments dats chose dat Rwanda is a country that respect Human rights for EVERY SINGLE rwandan rather that your bullshit economic stuff!show me also economic figures and statistics.this is not about your emotion or feelings about Rwanda this is about FACTS!!!!!!!!your emotion doesn't make any rwanda to wake up with a his belly full and with that thing that I call FREEDOM that you might never experience in your whole life.

        Reply
        1. Agaculama

          Well said, Messenger. HUMAN RIGHTS IN RWANDA MEANS THE SOLE HUMAN RIGHTS OF KAGAME AND HIS IMPERIALIST MERCENARIES PLUNDERING THE WESTERN DONORS, AS WELL AS THE NEIGHBOURING RDC !

          Reply
      2. peaceharvey

        I am sorry to hear your have to say. I have never knew that consuming milk and honey resulted in sadness, melancholy and gloomy mood. Is it what your milk and honey do to your people? I was in Rwanda a couple of months ego. What I saw is so frightining that when I read your comment my thoughts went like this: if the milk and honey this guy is talking about is what they feed rwandan people, maybe they should let Kagame and his supporters like him test it. That way, they they will know that it's unfit for human consumption. Can you explain how and when blood turned into milk and honey in human history?

        Reply
        1. success

          I am so sorry for you, honey is honey, and milk is milk if you bring the issue of blood ask genociders they will tell you, and if you ask me about honey and milk I will explain and give you to taste if you have never.I imagine you are very confused of where you are may be out of this country looking for bread, come back and enjoy your country rather than complaining of blood that was shed, all of us are sad but the greatest sadness is you to fail to accept the truth
          Rwanda is Ok

          Reply
    2. Mwinyi

      Mutabazi let me hope your not acomplice of genocidiers or sympathise with them how can you say the Person who stoped genocide in Rwanda was supervising the genocide did he commit genocide in Rwanda i am sorry you may not be a rwandaese or a victim of the genocide and if are better be nationalistic not an opportunistic the peaple you were killed in congo all have returned home and are peacefully settled though some were involved in genocide but have reconciled, or how can you say that the money which is used to reconstruct the country has been channeled to the killing of peaple who gain from it change your attitude and contribute to the development of your country

      Reply
  3. @successniyo

    hey, Economically Rwanda have improved, what can we do to improve our economy more than today,__Many have fled the country because of evil they committed during 1994 Rwanda genocide__Others served their terms in prison and were set free, but for those still hiding- you can never do evil and hide by the way you can run away from something but you cant run away from yourself

    Reply
    1. peaceharvey

      Do this people know Rwanda? You should stop confounding Kigali with the whole Rwanda. Actually, the economic development that Rwanda had atteined before the power grad by RPF has thanked. The economic development of Kigali is no spectacular. After all, 16 years of consolidation of Rwandan efforts on it, and milking away resources that formely belongied to other region of Rwanda could not bring no less appearence of Kigali than it is today. Kigali did not need any political leadership to look like it is today. If the current leadeship had not stall progress, Kigali would be sgnificantilly more advanced than it is. This to say that the current leadership should not not take credit of any economic progress, but economic stress for the people of Rwanda.

      Reply
      1. Mwinyi

        I am suprised hope your the one who does not Rwanda now the way it has transformed economically and peaple have progressed in business so what are talking a bout the economic stresss for the peaple of Rwanda stop misleading the public in case your not in the country just stop gossiping and join the others and contribute to its development the doors are open to whoever wants to prosper in business which is the source of the economic progress because Rwanda's economy is ok and stable

        Reply
  4. June

    Talk of indictments against Kagame,did you not read Wikileaks? It was discoverd that the French Judge's indictiments were politically motivated.With the help of French president they wanted to cover the guiltness of their role in Rwanda Genocide against the Tutsi.So thats is history now.There is nothing you can do to criminize an innocent.And yes US ,UK will send billions of dollars,pounds bse they find no basis for you lies.
    Suck it !

    Reply
    1. Agaculama

      "June" or "Charlot" or whatever other nicknames of "BamÔtsi wa MufaraÔn AkagÔme".

      1/ You are only zapped propaganda agents. You are just stuff distributors for one pence. You are NOT interested with truth but you are only distilling lies. You are NOT interested by justice for the majority of the Rwandan population. We all know your network, who you are and almost what you are not, what you have never been, and what you will never be.

      2/ FACTS ARE FACTS, AND HISTORY WILL BE YOUR JUDGE, KID, and the reality doesn't need to travel through filters or open doors like wiwileeks, NSS, ESO or DMI or OR(DES)INFOR stuff offices for beggars asking money to Abazuungu! Ask it to Saddam Hussein, to Mengistu Haïle Mariam, to Ali and other friends of UK-USA.

      3/ Your culture is lie and dissimulation since your mythological Kimanuka ancesters falled from the sky where there is no place for you forever. Ask it on Imana.biz, on tweetter or on fesses-bouc, and suck the Res nullius answer forever.

      (to be followed)

      Reply
        1. agaculama

          Hi Messenger. This the TRUTH in this so called independant New Rouwandan Banana Republic, colonized by foreign Anglo-Saxon or pdgin-speeking mercenaries coming from Uganda since October 1990! You will learn also that 700,000 Rwandans (that means poor Hutu) are the next targets of the bloodthirsty junta that decided to condemn them with vasectomy and sterilization, thanks 250,000,000 $ (also for Ghana and Mozambique) from the Rockefeller Foundation and Eugenic Society. Thanks for your support.

          Reply
    2. Mwinyi

      Thats right no need to believe such lies, there was no basis for the indictiment agaist Kagame who stoped genocide and reconciled both parties who leave together in hermony

      Reply
      1. agaculama

        Umwiinyi weee! Uutiinyoonze ntaa cyo agera ho ! The guy who never don't deprive himself from food will never have success in his enterprise.
        Umwiinyi weee! Iyo iinzoka igeze mu bunyereri iriinyorogorota! When a snake arrives on a gliding ground, he has a lot of difficulties to walk!
        In Rwanda KAGAME PLANED THE GENOCIDE OF THE RWANDANS, FIRST OF ALL OF THE TUTSI INTRAMUROS LIVING IN RWANDA (THE CLASS FIVE = TO BE KILLED, ACCORDING TO THE ORDERS OF THE RPF HIGH COMMAND IN MULINDI HQ). KAGAMA DID NOT STOP THE GENOCIDE BECAUSE HE IS A VERY BAD MILITARY AND STRATEGIST.
        Finally, HUTU MAJORITY "LIVES IN HARMONY" with the KAGAME KKK, after vasectomy and sterilization ! THIS THE TRUTH for the next 700,000 HUTU victims who are the targets on short term (3 years).

        Reply
    3. @successniyo

      These yankees, are wondering why US and UK is still sending some Benjamins-Man we gonna get them, we gonna use them to develop Rwanda and at the end you shall remain myth story tellers when others have progressed. Being outside your country, I know it pains a lot but If you are not Killers please come and enjoy the country, If you are Killers come and face justice-time will be your enemy one day when it comes to your turn-be brilliant and come in your country to enjoy development, by the way If you think you have an imported skill Rwanda is ready to accept your consultancies if not come and be skilled -tink 'bout it Man

      Reply
  5. agaculama

    (followed)

    4/ Your artificial Rwandan "paradise" is a dictatorship under perfusion by our democratic taxpayers: 53% of the income of your so called "independant" country comes from our occidental money, 79% of which are gifts. You are so proud that US and UK will send "billions of dollars, pounds" but the reality is that you are a junta of bloodthirsty beggars and autocratic mendicants.

    5/ The article of Gatebuke is very interesting and shows he analyzed and understands the question. Your answer shows that you are just waiting a gift of 10 $ from your Banana Republic, as a reward for your job of perezidential Mugaragu.

    (to be followed)

    Reply
    1. @successniyo

      "your occidental money"-I wish you are not Rwandese because If you are then the very beggar is you because you are maybe in another country which is not Rwanda.,If so, Which investment do you have there where you are claiming your money that we use as support- Do you know anything about Cooperation and Integration? If you dont thats what happens with Occidental world to we African countries. Rwandese are working and you keep on criticising-the day your fee gets to an end you will come back to beg in Rwanda because we are speeding up to get there

      Reply
      1. agaculama

        (1) Mister NIIYA NIYO and your so called success.
        What you write is a typical ubweenge nonsense from a pro-RPF Prop&Stuff agent who can not prove that he is really in Rwanda for helping his "so called" people, I statistically guess the Hutu majority. Your "maybe" is NOT "reality". That Agaculama has or don't have personnal investments in Rwanda has no interest. Agaculama speaks about the taxpayers of The Netherlands, Sweden, Finland, Luxemburg, Belgium, Italy, Japan, UK, USA (250,000,000 $/FY) et al.
        You probably are NOT able to read what I wrote, and high certainly you are NOT able to understand what you read. So, for the last of the classroom, I will repeat statistics on FOUR FISCAL YEARS (Rwandan Ministry of Economy): 53% OF THE INCOME OF the so called independant State of RWANDA and proud to be independant, officially COMES FROM the taxpayers of the DONOR COUNTRIES of Rwanda, 79% OF WHICH ARE GIFTS that have not to be reimbursed.

        Reply
      2. agaculama

        (2) And WE DON'T TAKE IN ACCOUNT THE MORE THAN 250,000,000 $ PLUNDERED IN RDC EVERY YEAR BY RWANDAN RAZZIAS, for explaining the so called "exemplary development" of your banana republic. DID YOU READ THE MAPPING EXERCICE PUBLISHED BY UNO HCHR, kid?
        SO, NIIJA NIJO, the "exemplary leaders", world champions in razzia, of your beloved country where you don't live today, are just beggars and mendicants and thus njyaanjya asking for money on the corner of the Western World streets where they find the doors of the ministries of Cooperation.
        Njyo weee, the RPF Umutootsi, yes "successniyo" yaanga uumukaangura nijoro" ! This successniyo don't like when we make him awake during the (Rwandan) night! We would be very interested to know in which Western country this "proud to be independant" guest is begging in North America.

        Reply
  6. Agaculama

    6/ You conclude unpolitely by a "Suck it". Let me then give one single advice to you, poor mendicant in the West: "SUCK IT IF YOU FIND A TRACE OF IT"… of course after your vasectomy, your circumcision and perhaps your castration, that fÔllÔwed the neyÔrÔuwandan perezidential Ôrder, ôôôh…

    DEMOCRACY IS DEMOCRACY AND YOU ARE MILLIONS OF KILOMETERS FROM ACHIEVING THIS GOAL BECAUSE WHEN YOU FALLED FROM THE SKY, YOU FIRST LANDED ON PLANET MARCH WHERE YOU LEARNED WAR, IMPERIALISM, PROPAGANDA, LIES AND HUMANITY DENIERS STUFF.

    (end)

    Reply
  7. fakegbagbo

    While I agree that it's often shameful how the UN and international community are not righting wrongs, I don't agree that's a reason to criticize them for where they are trying to do so at the minute, in Ivory Coast.

    Comparing e.g. the US situation with the one in CIV is a bit of a stretch:
    - The Constitutional Council in CIV is headed by Gbagbo's good friend and election campaign manager.
    - The country is coming back from a civil war to reunite the opposing sides and agree to work together under democratic rule. This has been a long process with huge involvement of the UN and it's frustrating to see it all fall to pieces because the losing incumbent is refusing to play by the rules.
    - The two main parties in the US didn't invite the UN to oversee and certify their elections.
    - The country might go back to civil war precisely because of this and that's certainly not a situation you've had in the US.

    I can fully understand and accept your aversion to military intervention, but to quote a Nigerian official: “It is one thing to condemn our position, but let them show what the alternatives are." While you condemn military intervention you're then asking for the application of "diplomatic dialogue". Not only is this what has been tried for the last two months and continues to be attempted, it so far certainly hasn't brought us anywhere near a resolution. Gbagbo has made it perfectly clear that he will not step down, and you appear to believe if the international community just accepts that, everything will be fine and presumably not return back to what it was before, a civil war, just with two parties better armed this time around. Seems unlikely to me.

    And finally, you call it a "stolen" election with double-quotes as if it wasn't. There's not much evidence to suggest Gbagbo has won this election unless you're a friend of far-reaching conspiracy theories.

    Reply
    1. Claude Gatebuke

      @Fakegbagbo – In case it wasn't clear, my reference to "stolen" election was in reference to G.W. Bush and Al Gore in 2000. If that is is the election you think was stolen, the US Supreme court did not find evidence to confirm that. it was not in reference to what happened in CIV.

      Feel free to disagree with my proposed alternatives but the "diplomatic dialogue" is much closer to the solution than military intervention. Look no further than neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone to get a glimpse of what military intervention could achieve. Or take a look at Iraq where military intervention was supposed to install democracy. I guess now we are still in that country looking for weapons of mass destruction?

      It seems like you missed my point in the article when you make your comment that neither Bush or Gore invited the UN to "certify" elections. You are right about that. My point is, the entity they agreed by default to certify the results which is the electoral college did not certify that election. It was decided by the supreme court.

      As for the part where you think I believe the international community should accept Gbagbo's position, I would recommend that you read the article again and point out anywhere where that was inferred.

      Reply
      1. fakegbagbo

        Claude, I thank you for pointing out where I misread your article and apologise for having done so. I also thank you for engaging beyond the contribution you made with your initial article.

        I guess my points are these:
        - We have two parties here that have been at war and the culmination of the peace process in these elections has turned – thanks to none other than Laurent Gbagbo – into a powerfully destructive shambles which in itself if likely to cause a return to civil war.
        - A powerful military intervention might lead to a quicker, less costly in terms of lives and with respect to the election result fairer outcome than letting them fight it out themselves, and a mere military threat stands the chance of being a key facility in any negotiated solution. It might admittedly also lead to a catastrophe (see Rebecca Sargent's argument) and I'm not saying anyone should go in there lightly now or be particularly keen to do it.

        I'm not generally and not in this case either an outright advocate for war and it's an ongoing battle for me to even get clarity on what I think would be the best way of dealing with what is a terribly complicated solution.

        You are asserting that a diplomatic solution is better and you seem to think it can be effective. You are not explaining why you think so. My wish is it that you are right, but I am very sceptical of that, that's all. Gbagbo will not move without the severest of pressures.

        PS: As you brought it up, I consider the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan a complete disgrace and I would like to remind everyone that the UN that now says Ouattara irrefutably won the election is the same UN that made it perfectly clear their investigations showed there were no WMDs in Iraq, well before the war. I have to admit to not being well enough informed about the wars in SL and Liberia but while I've read about the terrible behaviour of ECOMOG soldiers, I have also seen the opinion voiced that intervention in these cases was a better solution than letting the situations run their courses. SL seems to be one of the corners of the world where Tony Blair is still admired, precisely for having intervened there militarily. I'm not saying that's proof of anything, just an indicator that perhaps the decision on military intervention needs to be made on a case by case basis and it might be worth discussing it.

        Reply
    2. Eddie

      Yo, are you out of your mind to think that Ouatarra won the elections. If so, prove it. Even the AU's review on IC's elections questions how the elections were run in the north where Ouatarra's rebels rule.

      Reply
      1. fakegbagbo

        Hi Eddie,

        among others, ECOWAS, the UN, the EU and indeed the AU have stated that there is no doubt as to who has won the elections and that is Ouattara. Unfortunately they are basing this on data that is not fully publicly available. I have analysed the subset of data that is publicly available and has been confirmed by the Ouattara-friendly Independent Election Commission, the UN and the Gbagbo-friendly Constitutional Council. I conclude there is very little room for doubt that Ouattara did indeed win. You are welcome to read (and criticise) my analysis here: http://fakegbagbo.wordpress.com/2011/02/06/has-ou

        Reply
  8. mugabondekwe

    Rwanda will strive amidst nonsense allegations ,comparisons it is we Rwandans to solve our problems in our own way and find remedies like some success in Universal Health care, Gacaca, gender equality,unity and reconciliation Rwanda has became a hub of knowledge on these issues let other came and learn frm us

    Reply
    1. @successniyo

      ICT high,education-high,UN mission to restore peace-high, Infrastructure-high,Agriculture-high, medical-high,and many other things that you know but ignore,Mugabo let them shout about democracy we gonna shout about market to sell our quality products, and these fellows as well shall sell their ill criticism

      Reply
  9. peace

    Please we need peace, no war. It seems you live forever on this planet. Don't forget that one day you will be buried or burnt. After death we are all nothing.
    Please peace

    Reply
  10. Claude Gatebuke

    Fakegbagbo,

    Happy to engage. I agree with you on the Iraq and Afghanistan war. Though the UN continues to stand by as the war in Afghanistan rages on. The UN's performance in Rwanda, Congo, Somalia, Haiti, and too many other places to mention might explain why I think there are other alternatives than them having the last say in the CIV election especially given how things have now tuned out.

    Reply
  11. Claude Gatebuke

    Continued

    I am far from advocating that the situation runs its course. If it does, I am affraid Gbagbo may remain president unscathed. I am advocating resolving the conflict without military intervention. For a country that is on the brink of war, firing shots will escalate things. Obviously Kenya avoided civil war (and it was really close) by going the route of dialogue. I totally agree with you that additional pressure must be mounted against Gbagbo. Charles Taylor and Foday Sankoh of SL started out claiming to fight against tyrany and fighting for freedom. These wre military interventions intended to topple tyrants. Unless you think there will be no resistence from Gbagbo, revenge, and outright wartime madness from both sides, militarism will bring CIV to its knees even if it's by the international community.

    Reply
    1. Eddie

      Why do you believe that Gbagbo lost the elections? Are you kidding? You just wrote a good artcle and yet you still click to western corporation news media that state that Gbagbo lost!?

      Reply
      1. Claude Gatebuke

        @Eddie, thanks. Please point out where I said Gbagbo lost. Saying that pressure must be exerted on him to open up to a negotiated solution is far from saying he lost or won. Whether he won or lost, I think there is an urgent need to negotiate a way forward for CIV.

        Reply
        1. Eddie

          Nope, instead Ouatarra must be pressed to accept to do a recount and that's only way to bring the endless of war in IC.

          Outarra has detabilized IC since 2002, with his rebel groups being financed by the West, and yet you dare to say that Gbagbo should be pressed, that's not right!

          Reply
          1. fakegbagbo

            What's the recount supposed to be for?

            The UN did a count, the (Ouattara-friendly) IEC did a count (1), the results of which were confirmed by the UN and then the Constitutional Council (led by Gbagbo's election campaign manager) did its own count (2) which almost exactly matches the IEC count except that they then decided to cancel seven whole districts in Ouattara's Northern strongholds, that is 600,000 votes or more than 10% of the country's voting population, to swing the result.

            (1) http://www.abidjan.net/elections2010/resultats/2e
            (2) http://www.abidjan.net/elections2010/resultats/2e

            With three counts from all sides involved all coming to essentially the same result straight after the election, how do you justify your request for a recount?

            And what makes you think this would bring peace? In the face of a lost election, Gbagbo is staying true to his election statement "We win or we win" and Ouattara is not inclined to let go of an election he evidently won. A recount, no matter what the result, is not going to change the position of either.

  12. Claude Gatebuke

    continued

    Rwanda and Uganda have tried this military intervention with the blessings of the international community to resolve their political issues and ended up committing genocide in Congo against their own people and against the Congolese resulting in 6 million deaths of innocent people. 3 million of these were children under the age of 5. Ethiopia tried the same with Somalia and what was the result? We removed the Taliban from power, where has that gotten us? Sadam is out of Iraq, are the Iraqi's better off now? Are their families still intact? Had Sadam been removed through alternative means, would it have been better than military intervention? The example you give of SL is a good flip side example, but there just haven't been many successes with such ventures.

    Reply

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