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Still no news of 37 missing Georgia prison strikers

February 19, 2011

by Eugene Thomas

In retaliation for organizing the Georgia prison strike, Miguel Jackson was pepper sprayed, handcuffed and beaten with hammers, resulting in a fractured nose and 50 stitches to his face, and guards tried to throw him over the railing from the second floor, his wife said. – Photo courtesy of the Final Call
We still haven’t heard of who and where are those 37 Georgia prisoners who were labeled the leaders and organizers of the sit-down strike that began Dec. 9. But we do know that there are some prisoners from Smith State Prison here being harassed for participating in the protest. I haven’t been able to get to the lock-down unit where they are being held.

Reidsville, where we are, is hiding some of those brothers. This place has a history of hiding people, as they did Imam Jamil A. Al-Amin before transferring him to federal prison in Florence, Colorado.

Along with that, we have a situation here where three young brothers, including my old cellmate, are being held for murder and robbery of an older white prisoner, who occupied the bunk I slept in after I was put in the “hole.” These folks have been just holding these young brothers. They haven’t indicted neither one of them, haven’t fingerprinted either of them, aren’t giving them their proper segregation hearing — just holding them in lockup. It’s an interesting story, especially in light of everything taking place in Georgia now and with this place being a massive lockdown facility. They’ve been in the “hole” now five months. I call them the “Reidsville 3.”

Statement of support and solidarity for the Lucasville Brothers

With the name of G’d, the Beneficent, the Merciful, on behalf of the prisoners here in the state of Georgia struggling and striving for human and civil rights, we lend our spirits, hearts and minds to you all, and we send our support and solidarity equally.

Your struggle is our struggle, your fight is our fight, your plight is our plight. We are with you, against any and all that oppose you, come what may — hell or highwater!

Send our brother some love and light. Write to: Eugene Thomas, 671488, Georgia State Prison, 2164 Georgia Highway 147, Reidsville, GA 30499.

Revolutionary salute to the Georgia prison strikers

by Siddique Abdullah Hasan

I have a lot of articles and emails on the strike in Georgia. Wow! It was a complete display of solidarity that unsettled the prisoncrats and has created much discussion among the convicts.

I was born and raised in Georgia, did five years in prison there, have some family and comrades currently doing time there, so I know first hand how foul these hillbillies can be.

One of my relatives is Troy Anthony Davis [on death row in Georgia – see TroyAnthonyDavis.org]. His is my paternal first cousin.

Hasan, who wrote this in a postcard to the Bay View, is one of the Lucasville prisoners in Ohio who went on hunger strike beginning Jan. 3. Send him some love and light: Siddique Abdullah Hasan, R 130-559, P.O. Box 1436, Youngstown OH 44501.

6 thoughts on “Still no news of 37 missing Georgia prison strikers

  1. Aaron

    America is creating a snowball effect that better be watched carefully, this crazy racist behavior of the past will not go on tolerated as it did before. With jobs being taken, economics on the brink of collapse, and depression underway, the straw that breaks the camels back can be at any moment they better put a leash on their prison gaurds.

    People are more educated, less tolerant, and certainly not affraid anymore, anitcs like this just take them that much closer to an upraise to the magnitiude of Egypt, this is a result of people not being able to take it anymore, this is very close, as gas prices will rise, jobs have not recovered, and Obamas approval rating is about the same as Bush Second term, not to mention the deficiet that is fiscally impossible to pay back, EVER.

    Its a dark cloud hovering over the U.S in situations like this it would be best to give these young brothers justice before a race war, civil war, or coup takes place, within the U.S. Its looming and I know the signs cant be being ignored. I wish all of these people from the gaurds to the prisoners well, but the days of blind oppression are over, justice comes swift in these odd times. God forbid one of these young brothers dies from maltreatment this will spark an uprising.

    Reply
  2. Teri Ford

    Please tell me that this has been forwarded to every "group" in the US and beyond??? If I was a member of the NAACP, I'd want to know. Someone's CIVIL RIGHTS are being VIOLATED here!

    Reply
  3. Wadi'The Zima'

    The tragedy is that in addition to the lamentable fact that there are more African-Americans in prison than there are in higher education, there is also the disturbing trend towards a return to the 70's & 80's when the brutality and murderous Racism of the penal institutions led to rebellions in Attica, Soledad etc From that crucible of pain came the anguished cry of 'Blood in my Eye' and 'Soledad brother'(By George Jackson). The prison struggle of that period connected with the civil Rights and Led to the involvement of folks like Professor Angela Davis and the raising of consciousness and awareness .
    We need a similarly co ordinated approach.
    As things currently stand the system is condemning huge swathes of the African-American to 'Lumpen status' and therefore outside of the economic and social mainstream…A nuanced form of ethnic cleansing.
    As Always Wadi'The Zima'

    Reply
    1. Guest

      No you don't. You have rights, even when you are a prisoner. You have been listening to too much right-wing talk radio.

      Reply
  4. Feliuai Ieremia

    Bayview National Black Newspaper,

    Thank you for sharing the issues in our prison institutions and updating the public with recent news that you could touch on. It is a great joy that we are broadcasting what has been hidden behind these bars, as our citizens will learn how these facilities train their prison guards to dehumanize the incarcerated. Hence, what is currently going on at the Georgia prison institutions. Who ever claimed that prisoners deserve any type of punishment? It is clear that these prisoners have been abused without control, losing nearly their right to live. Yet, is the blame just the prison guards? Or could it be society itself that creates a blindfold over our eyes and only those that unravel the tie, seek the truth? If so, could you tell me why we acquiesce to this system? Did it really take Salamu Alaikum's violent beating or the disappearance of the 37 prisoners in Georgia to realize and react? Too long have we been systemized to ignore our prisoners, so the remaining question left is if change could only be a miracle. I support the restoration of human rights for every prisoner, and every campaign that fights against the deprivation of equality for these citizens. I conclude with an applaud for your efforts to acknowledge and inform those who can truly make a difference.

    Reply

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