Support SF BayView
Donate or Subscribe to SF Bay View
Follow Us Twitter Facebook

Marikana mine workers massacred by South African police

August 17, 2012

Two videos follow the story

Moments before the massacre, mine workers confront police. – Photo: Siphiwe Sibeko, Reuters
Al Jazeera reports: “South African police killed 34 people (now estimated at 45) in a shooting at a mine in North West province, the country’s police chief says.

“Officers shot at the workers who were protesting on Thursday afternoon over pay at the Lonmin platinum mine in Marikana, some 100km northwest of Johannesburg.

“The incident, which police said was an act of self-defense, appears to be one of the bloodiest police operations since the end of white-minority rule in 1994 in Africa’s biggest economy. …

“In a front page editorial, The Sowetan newspaper questioned what had changed since 1994. ‘It has happened in this country before where the apartheid regime treated black people like objects,’ the paper said.”

Update: The Times of Johannesburg reports Aug. 18 that the miners are even more defiant in the wake of the massacre: “Makhosi Mbongane, a 32-year-old winch operator, said mine managers should have come to the striking workers rather than send police.” Strikers are demanding monthly salary raises from R5,400 ($648) to R12,500 ($1,500), according to CNN. The Times continues: “Mbongane vowed that he was not going back to work and would not allow anyone else to do so either.

“‘They can beat us, kill us and kick and trample on us with their feet, do whatever they want to do, we aren’t going to go back to work,’ he told The Associated Press. ‘If they employ other people, they won’t be able to work either. We will stay here and kill them.’ …

“The shootings ‘awaken us to the reality of the time bomb that has stopped ticking – it has exploded,’ The Sowetan newspaper said in a front-page editorial Friday. ‘Africans are pitted against each other … They are fighting for a bigger slice of the mineral wealth of the country.’”

Mine operator Lonmin is the world’s third largest supplier of platinum. Most of its 28,000 employees work at the Marikana mine, according to CNN.

Solidarity with mine workers at Marikana Platinum

by Abahlali baseMjondolo (Shack Dwellers Union)

As police move in after the shooting, an officer picks up a handgun that miners had taken from police. The miners, armed only with machetes and spears – not guns – faced heavily armed militarized police. – Photo: STR-EPA
Aug. 17, 2012 – Abahlali baseMjondolo are deeply shocked by the murderous cruelty of the South African police – and those that give the police their orders – at the Marikana Platinum Mine in the North West. The killing of more than 40 mine workers yesterday by the SAPS (South African Police Services) is immoral and brings great disgrace on our country. There were other ways and much better ways to handle the situation. Yesterday will always be remembered as a dark day in the long history of oppression in South Africa.

We wish to express our solidarity to all the families of the workers that have been killed and injured. We share your sorrow. You are not alone. We carry our pain together. Your children may not grow knowing their fathers but they will not grow alone. We have to care for each other and stand together as we struggle for a world that puts human beings first and treats all human beings equally.

We wish to express our solidarity to all struggling workers. We face the same system that makes some people rich and others poor. We face the same government that refuses to recognize our humanity, which tries to force us to the margins of society and which represses us when we resist.

Your children may not grow knowing their fathers but they will not grow alone. We have to care for each other and stand together as we struggle for a world that puts human beings first and treats all human beings equally.

The ANC (African National Congress) have shown no regard for the people of this country. They are putting us in transit camps and trying to keep us in bantustans. They are leaving us to burn in our shacks every winter. They are beating us in the police stations. They are shooting us in the streets. Millions of us cannot find work.

A government that kills its citizens is immoral and must be opposed by everyone. A government that kills its citizens has lost all moral right to govern. What happened yesterday is no different from the killings of the apartheid government. This is no different to the Sharpeville massacre in 1960 which claimed 69 lives. It is no different to the Boipotong massacre in 1992 which claimed 45 lives.

A government that kills its citizens has lost all moral right to govern. What happened yesterday is no different from the killings of the apartheid government.

Millions of people have suffered in their shacks and millions have suffered with work and without work year after year. Some shack dwellers are also workers and sometimes shack dwellers are too poor to be workers. But we have all suffered enough at the hands of the police, at the hands of politicians and at the hands of the rich.

It has always been our call that real freedom and democracy are still a dream for the poor and the working class. All we see is politicians enriching themselves by stealing public funds that are meant to better people’s lives.

All we see is that the new government keeps on with many of the worst policies of the old government. All we see is that our struggles are criminalized and repressed. The progressive middle classes are struggling to defend the freedom and democracy that they received in 1994. We are still struggling for freedom and democracy to come.

More than 25 people have been killed by the police during protests since 2000. Tebogo Mkhonza in Harrismith, Monica Ngcobo in Umlazi and Andries Tatane in Ficksburg are just three of the people that have been murdered in the streets by the police. Activists have been tortured and assassinated.

Our movement, like the Landless People’s Movement and the Unemployed People’s Movement, has been attacked in the night by armed men representing the ruling party. For months after our movement was attacked in the Kennedy Road settlement in Durban in 2009, the homes of our leading members were openly destroyed every weekend while the police refused to intervene.

Last year Nigel Gumede, the head of Housing in eThekwini, publicly said that the ANC was at war with our movement and threatened to kill S’bu Zikode. Senior people in the ANC have set a clear tone for the rest to follow.

Poor people have been encouraged to attack and kill each other in the name of ethnicity and nationality. It is time to say enough. It is time to say no more. It is high time that all progressive forces join hands to curb this carnage. It is high time that all progressive forces join hands in a struggle for real justice and real democracy.

Before the massacre, thousands of striking mine workers had staged a sit-in outside the mine. – Photo: AFP
We have to recognize that there is a war against the poor in this country. We did not want this war, but it has come to us. Today no one can deny that a war is being fought against the poor.

We have to recognize that there is a war against the poor in this country. We did not want this war, but it has come to us.

The red ants and the police are not here to serve the people. They are here to drive the poor out of the cities, contain us in the human dumping grounds and repress our struggles.

We have to stop pretending that the politicians are our comrades when they have chosen to make themselves our enemies. We have to fight the war that has come to us. And we have to fight it in a way that puts human dignity and the equality of all people at the start of our struggle and at the heart of our struggle.

We are aware of the dangers of the South African politic when struggling citizens demand real freedom and democracy. Activists are living under serious threats all over the country.

We are aware of the time bomb that the shack dwellers in this country are sitting on. We have always warned, from the time when we first started to organize, that the anger of the poor can go in many directions. The dangers that we face can come from how people respond to oppression as well as from oppression itself.

There is more protest in South Africa than anywhere in the world. But the government takes no notice of the people. It responds by militarizing the police.

There is more protest in South Africa than anywhere in the world. But the government takes no notice of the people. It responds by militarizing the police. It responds by talking about third forces. The local party structures send out armed men in the night.

The government wants to make the anger of the people criminal and treasonous. It works behind the scenes to support the armed men that invade our homes and threaten us and our families. We have to accept that this government does not care about us. We do not count to it. When we ask to be heard, we are treated as criminals and traitors.

A leader of the mine workers speaks to the miners during their sit-in. – Photo: Siphiwe Sibeko, Reuters
Abahlali baseMjondolo of the Western Cape will march to the National Parliament in Cape Town at 3 p.m. this afternoon together with comrades from other organizations. In Durban we will hold conversations with different structures of our movement and our comrades in other organizations, as well as the churches, to plan a way forward.

Global Peace and Justice Auckland in New Zealand will be marching to the South African embassy in Auckland at 1 Kimberly Road at 2 p.m. today. Our comrades in Cape Town and New Zealand march with our solidarity.

We all have to stand together. A war has come to us and we must fight it in a way that makes sure that we never turn into our enemies. We must fight this war in a way that puts humanity against brutality and never in a way that puts one brutality against another. Once your struggle starts to make you like your enemies everything is lost.

A politic of war has come to us. We have no choice but to resist. But we must resist with our own politic, which is a militant people’s politic that starts and ends by honoring the dignity of all people.

Abahlali baseMjondolo (Shack Dwellers Union) is the largest social movement of the poor in post-apartheid South Africa. To learn more, visit http://www.abahlali.org.

Protest in New Zealand against the massacre of striking mine workers

by John Minto

To give their children hope and replace their shanties with decent housing, the mine workers need the raise their strike demands. A study released two days before the massacre reports that mine operator “Lonmin had a bad track record with high levels of fatalities and keeping workers in ‘very poor living conditions’ … in deteriorating shacks without electricity. Some children suffer from chronic illnesses due to sewage spills caused by broken drainage,” according to The Times of Johannesburg. - Photo: David Van Wyk
Aug. 17, 2012 – For the first time in 20 years, New Zealanders will picket a South African government institution in Auckland tomorrow in protest at yesterday’s killing of striking mine workers by South African police.

The appalling scenes where up to 18 workers (later reported to be 45) were shot dead are reminiscent of the darkest days of apartheid – the Sharpeville massacre of 1960 and the murder of Black school children in Soweto in June 1976 come immediately to mind.

The precise details of the killings are unclear, but irrespective of this the blame lies squarely with the ANC government which has been in power for 18 years while conditions have become worse for most South Africans.

The mineworkers strike and the struggle for decent housing, health, incomes and education are the same struggles the ANC once supported but have turned their backs on since gaining power.

They have betrayed the core principles of the historic “Freedom Charter” and instead followed free-market economic policies which has meant little change in the lives of the poorest South Africans while a wealthy elite, which includes a few Black faces now, has become obscenely rich.

The day after the massacre, wives and mothers of the mine workers protest against the police. – Photo: Themba Hadebe, AP
Race-based apartheid has been replaced with economic apartheid.

New Zealanders didn’t protest on the streets to pave the way for a small number of Black millionaires to be created at the expense of the majority.

Race-based apartheid has been replaced with economic apartheid.

Last year in a withering attack on the ANC, Bishop Desmond Tutu said the ANC government was in some ways worse than the old apartheid regime and told South African President Jacob Zuma that the day would come when people would pray for the defeat of the ANC.

For many, that day can’t come soon enough.

The picket will be held outside the new South African consulate in Auckland at 1 Kimberley Road, Epsom, Auckland, from 2 p.m. tomorrow, Saturday, Aug. 18.

Included on the picket line will be some veterans of the anti-apartheid struggle.

John Minto, spokesperson for Global Peace and Justice Auckland (GPJA), can be reached at johnminto@orcon.net.nz.

 

24 thoughts on “Marikana mine workers massacred by South African police

  1. Renaldo Ricketts

    Who gave the order to shoot innocent miners, the question is who owns the mines. The Black S.African gov. is a prop,whites own 97% of all the wealth in S.Africa, this massacre is reminiscent of the Soweto gratuitous killings of unarmed students. The continent of Africa is still unde colonial rule, they maintain a Black face,it's simply a perpetual facade by europeons who still own all the minerals in Africa. Whites still kill with impunity to protect their economic interest . The S.African Black gov .are clows no circus wants them. The people are rebelling against the installed puppets,the truth will seep out by osmosis. One day S.Africa will be free of euro-peon rule ,what they have today is subordinate elite kneegrow class,who will for ever be on their knees chanting massah are we sick -as Malcolm said -kneegrows are always ontheir knees. Wake up and smell reality.

    Reply
  2. Renaldo Ricketts

    The biggest facade ever unleached on the world was the S.African gov.deception of Black rule. After 27 yrs in jail they released Mandela under a complex plan to maintain power and relax economic sanctions against hem. This was scampolitics ona global scale, the whites lost nothing ,their wealth was not hindered,today they reap the fruits of Black labor ,and massacre them when they refuse to comply.

    Reply
  3. JENNY

    Whites have no voice in South Africa. There is no colonial rule here and whites do not rule the economy. This is propoganda. There are less than 4 million white people in SA and they are being systematically forced out of SA. Since 1994, more than 3500 farmers and their families have been tortured and murdered – a fact that never reaches international newspapers. Check it out on Google – there are sites with names and dates of murdered elderly people, babies, rapes on young children and women…. 3500 of them and the numbers are growing daily. Recently SA Airways instituted a policy of not accepted white cadets to train as pilots. White veterinary students are consistently denied access to the veterinary training college even though there are shortages of black students wanting to be vets. This is just the tip of it. Please send your people here to investigate and see the real truth. White people are blamed for everything, even tho there are so few of them and they try to keep their heads down and just get on with their lives. It’s truly scary here. Please come and see for yourselves. Our country is at Stage 5 on the Genocide index – white people will be massacred and by the time the truth comes out it will be too late. PLEASE. I beg of you, come and see for yourselves before you accept all this propaganda about white people “really ruling the country”.

    Reply
  4. C Mc Carthy

    Why do you vote for the ANC if they are CLOWNS. These Mines are owned by share holders. The Unions are to be blamed for allowing workers getting out of hand. Do not blame the police officers or the workers.

    Reply
    1. guest

      yes people fail to realize that its the ANC that has allowed people to protest with weapons.do they know how many police are being killed on a daily basis.Besides that its all well and good to blame the police what if you were the police in that situation .

      Reply
  5. OhBull!

    Portions of this article are a blatant manipulation of the truth, in fact a pure lie would be more to the point- the photographs are the sanitized version- they do not show these people armed to the teeth which they were:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=Marikana+strikers

    3000 protesters stormed 423 policeman- anyone would have fired under these circumstances- particularly when two of their colleagues (both black policemen) had been hacked to death with panagas (beyond recognition) two days earlier. And two security guards had been burned to death.

    @ Renaldo Ricketts this conflict started because of conflict between a 'non- official' union ie not NUM (the National Union of Mineworkers) and NUM who will not allow these people to negotiate wages with the mine because they are not NUM members the mine (which British owned BTW) is obviously quite happy with this arrangement too).

    Further more as Julius Malema noted today NUM is not a Union it is a business- they own shares in the mines- the unions in South Afrcia today are part of what Frans Fanon termed "The National Bourgeoisie" – and their leaders high flying lifestyle is their only real concern. They have sold out the workers.

    Your statistics are all wrong too- 97 % of ownership is not in white hands- in fact in the mining industry it closer to 28 % black owned, granted way still to low- but the point that you and people like you don't want to hear is that that 28 % ownership is largely in the hands of ANC loyalists, and is for there personal benefit only.

    The leadership of the ANC has been very good at 're- distributing' wealth- as long as the re- distribution was in their direction. The masses of black South Africans have not befitted from it (Fanon's National Bourgeoisie again).

    This last requires qualification- the ANC of today is NOT the ANC of Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisiulu et al- it is a self interested bourgeois parasite, I do really believe they (Mandela et al) believed in what they fought for- and there are people within the ANC that still do too- just not the ruling clique).

    So before you start spewing your racist drivel, maybe you should consider familiarizing yourself with the facts

    Reply
    1. Renaldo Ricketts

      The 97% figure is the stats for the entire country of South Africa . It's still a white ruled nation with a kneegrow face. It's an in ternational joke to even fathom Blacks own S.Africa ,they are a con trolled minority,5 % white population still ownes them.
      The release of Mandela was one of the biggest frauds perpetrated on the Continent of Africa. I hate to tell the delusional Africans who are lead to believe,they aren in power. The S.African gov.is a powerless facade, installed puppets on a string to serve the white minority gov. The whites created a subset gov, to maintian power,and have sanctions lifted. It was a clever staged show to bring Mandela back after jailing him for 27 yrs, they found the perfect "Manchurian Government " – a symbolic body in black face whose con trolled by the 5th whites. If you are indded a student of history then you know no one plots their demise.
      .

      Reply
      1. Renaldo ricketts

        The white S.Africans never lost a dime or power by bringing Mandela out of jail.
        They had him agree to certain conditions,the nation votes him in as president , a total smokes screen ,and again the people are duped in to believing their destiny lies in the hands of Africans,wrong. The only who spoke ther truth was Winnie Mandela ,she said "Nelson how can yu accept half a prize with a man who kept you in jail for 27 years" . She speaks the truth about the sham in S.Africa . what wer witness was blatant massacre of people who posed no threat to the police

        Reply
        1. OhBull!

          Dude, are you living on the same planet as the rest of us? I don't think so.

          No threat?- look at the footage, here is a link to get you started: http://www.iol.co.za/news/crime-courts/new-eviden

          Pay particular attention at about 55 seconds- clearly they are armed, a discharging firearm is not hard to see, nor are the pangas (machetes)- the long shiny things?

          Reply
        2. OhBull!

          PS If you still cannot empathise with the policemen on the ground, then I have a suggestion: Come to South Africa, I will take you into Soweto and give you a loud haler so you can spew this delusional drivel about Mandela there- I guarantee you you will learn the meaning of fear very rapidly

          Reply
    2. Selina

      Then if whites don't control the mines in SA then how can you explain Kimberly Diamond mines that are still owned by the Oppenhiemers' in SA

      Reply
      1. Selina

        Not too mention the heavey sanctions done on Zimbabwe by the EU and US including the various lands being occupied in Zim, Tanzania, Ethiopia etc., by US-Ivy league university's and US Corp.s

        for biofuel development Whites have a foot hold control throught out Africa starting w/S. Africa

        Reply
      2. OhBull!

        Simply put it isn't, the Oppenheimer families shareholding in De Beers was 40%, no longer: http://www.israelidiamond.co.il/english/News.aspx

        41.7% of South Africa’s primary residential market is owned by black South African's, 36 times the number who own shares- black South Africans largely invest in property- not shares.

        In fact Ferial Haffajee writing in City press (a daily newspaper with a very high readership amoung black South Africans) notes "Once you strip out foreign ownership, state ownership, cross-holdings (the latter two characterised as benign), it may well transpire that the levels of individual black and white ownership are about equal."

        Reference for both: City Press: http://www.citypress.co.za/Columnists/Ferial-Haff

        None of these companies (all are JSE, and/ or LSE and/ or NYSE listed) are solely owned by South Africans let alone white South Africans and certainly not individual families- they are all traded internationally.

        I think it is the same journalist who remarks elsewhere that the degree of transformation in South Africa has already achieved through BEE/ AA has taken generations in other countries faced with similar upliftment challenges.

        That said- as I have already said, and the title of above article implies it is not enough, as the tragedy at Marikana should be making clear to everyone.

        Families connected to influential individuals within the ANC have to date, too often, been the beneficiaries of BEE- to the detriment of the average black South African.

        Google the term "Tenderpreneur" and the name Khulubuse Zuma and Aurora Mines as examples (the Zuma case is just an individual example).

        The situation in South Africa is infinitely more complicated that the simplistic black/ white dichotomy that a lot of people simply assume, the realities in South Africa are more complicated than most non-South Africans (and a huge number of South African's) are even willing to try and understand.
        Simplistic the whites still run the country simply isn't borne out by the facts.

        Conspiracy theories tend to arise when people don't like the conclusions that the realities on the ground are forcing them to draw- the ANCs performance post liberation has in many areas been lack- lustre, many supporters are thus disappointed and thus jump to the conspiracy conclusion.

        As noted above, it is however not an absolute failure.

        Every single fact I have quoted can be independently verified for yourself online

        Reply
        1. Selina

          All of those companies you claim that doesn't have any holding in the SA mines there probably under different names

          Big businesses act as "parent" companies to small subsidaries all of the time insurance like Nationwide, Allied, Titan for example companies with same owners can merge with other foriegn companies in order to purchase more stocks in the precious stones and petroleum markets

          That still doesn't mean that the Oppenheimer aren't in SA

          Reply
          1. OhBull!

            You know, there actually is no point in discussing anything with conspiracy theorist, or bigots for that matter- nothing you or ricketts have raised change anything I have said- IT IS COMMON CAUSE THAT CERTAIN WHITES STILL HAVE TOO MUCH (there are other whites who are living in squatter camps- because they have nothing)- I have already acknowledged this.

            Ultimately there are none so blind as those who will not see.

            The new cleavage in South African is becoming class/ access to resources, race is still a hugely significant one- but what most South Africans (who are not members of the elites) don't realise is that they are not included in the race based club that they think is where there loyalties lie- classic Marxist false consciousness.

            There is a new clique that runs this country, it is a privileged elite consisting of blacks and whites, who's only interest is themselves, not the rest of the country.

            But you ignore people like Patrice Motsepe, Cyril Ramaposa, Tokyo Sexwale. Motosepe and Ramaposa (who is a former communist and trade union leader btw) are both on the list of 15 that he cherry picks his examples from: http://www.therichest.org/nation/richest-people-i

            Ultimately time will show your position to be what is: half truths at very best.

            I note ricketts hasn't responded to the video link I posted- I am still waiting for the standard line: edited or footage taken from elsewhere, white minority controlled media blah, blah, blah.
            Whatever- he is the major of the capital of Cloud Lala Land.

            Try reading some of Moletsi Mbekhi's writings (Thabo Mbehki's brother, a journalist)- 'Architects of Poverty' in particular- no one comes out unscathed- not whites not the ruling ANC clique.

            If you want a closer approximation of the truth, try reading the analysis of South Africans living in the country, I say closer approximation because reality is a complicated thing.

            Oh! hang on- sorry- I forgot- you are not interested in the truth, just that subset of factoids that confirms your pre-existing bigotries.

            My apologies.

  6. James

    It is time for the real revolution of the people to begin in South Africa. Citizens, workers, students and all progressive elements must stand up against the current oppression and tyranny of capitalism. The wealth of South Africa belongs to the people not the privileged few. The blood of Marikana heroes that was shed so ruthlessly must not be in vain. Power to the people.

    Reply
  7. renaldo ricketts

    Below is the 15 Richest People In South Africa:

    No.1 Nicky Oppenheimer & family

    Net Worth:$6.8 billion – As of March 2012

    Source of wealth: De Beers, inherited

    South Africa’s Richest Person: #1

    Age:66 , Citizenship : South Africa , Residence: Johannesburg, South Africa

    Marital Status: Married, Children:1

    Nicky Oppenheimer is worth $6.8 billion. He is the richest person in South Africa and is the 139th richest person in the world. How did he get rich? He is the chairman of De Beers diamonds, of course, and also has a significant interest in Anglo-American plc, the gold mining company. He also owns Tswalu Kalahari Reserve, the largest private game reserve in South Africa.

    ——————————————————————————–

    No.2 Johann Rupert & family

    Net Worth:$5.1 billion – As of March 2012
    Source: Luxury goods, inherited and growing
    Age: 61 , Citizenship: South Africa, Residence: Stellenbosch, South Africa
    Marital Status: Married, Children:3

    Johann Rupert is the second-richest person in South Africa, being worth $5.1 billion. He is the 199th richest person in the world, and made his money from Richemont, the Swiss luxury group that owns Cartier, Dunhill, Chloe bags and MontBlanc pens. The company purchased online fashion portal Net-a-Porter. Remgro, his South African holding company purchased VenFin earlier in 2010. He also owns Rupert & Rothschild and L’Ormarins wine estates, and one of South Africa’s most exclusive golf clubs.

    ——————————————————————————–

    No.3 Christoffel Wiese

    Net Worth: $2.7 billion – As of March 2012

    Source: Consumer retail, self-made

    Age:70 , Citizenship: South Africa

    Marital Status: Married, Children: 3

    Christoffel, or Christo as he’s more commonly known, is the fourth-richest person in South Africa. He is worth $2.7 billion and made his money as CEO of Shoprite. He also owns a stake in Pepkor, a discount clothes, shoes and textiles store in South Africa, and is known for restoring a South African farm estate and remodelling it into a five-star hotel. Other assets include Lourensford Estate, the wine producer, and a private game reserve in the Kalahari. He is the 782nd richest person in the world.

    ——————————————————————————–

    No.4 Patrice Motsepe

    Net Worth:$2.7 Billion – As of March 2012

    Source: Mining, self-made

    Age:50 ,Citizenship: South Africa , Residence: Johannesburg, South Africa

    Marital Status: Married, Children:3

    Patrice Motsepe is South Africa’s third-richest person, worth $2.7 billion. He made his money in mining and is the 442nd richest person in the world. His money is the result of the purchasing of low-producing gold mine shafts in 1994, which he made profitable. Since then, he has built African Rainbow Minerals, benefiting as a result of South Africa’s Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) laws. He also owns a stake in Sanlam.

    South Africa’s Millionaires as of 2011 according to Forbes:

    #5 Lauritz (Laurie) Dippenaar
    Net Worth: $750 Million, Source: Banking, Insurance

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 63

    #6 Stephen Saad
    Net Worth: $640 Million, Source: Pharmaceuticals

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 47

    #7 Raymond Ackerman
    Net Worth: $545 Million, Source: Retailing

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 80

    #8 Gerrit Thomas (GT) Ferreira
    Net Worth: $460 Million, Source: Banking, Insurance

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 63

    #9 Jannie Mouton
    Net Worth: $300 Million, Source: Financial services

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 64

    #10 Michiel Le Roux
    Net Worth: $290 Million, Source: Banking

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 62

    #11 Adrian Gore
    Net Worth: $280 Million, Source: Financial services

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 47

    #12 Cyril Ramaphosa
    Net Worth: $275 Million, Source: Investments

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 59

    #13 Giovanni Ravazzotti
    Net Worth: $275 Million, Source: Ceramics, Tile

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 68

    #14 Markus Jooste
    Net Worth: $260 Million, Source: Furniture retailing

    Citizenship: South Africa , Age: 50

    #15 Paul Harris
    Net Worth: $250 Million, Source: Banking

    Reply
  8. Renaldo ricketts

    Below is the 15 Richest People In South Africa:
    No.1 Nicky Oppenheimer & family
    Net Worth:$6.8 billion – As of March 2012
    Source of wealth: De Beers, inherited
    South Africa’s Richest Person: #1
    Age:66 , Citizenship : South Africa , Residence: Johannesburg, South Africa
    Marital Status: Married, Children:1
    Nicky Oppenheimer is worth $6.8 billion. He is the richest person in South Africa and is the 139th richest person in the world. How did he get rich? He is the chairman of De Beers diamonds, of course, and also has a significant interest in Anglo-American plc, the gold mining company. He also owns Tswalu Kalahari Reserve, the largest private game reserve in South Africa.
    ——————————————————————————

    Reply
  9. Renaldo ricketts

    No.2 Johann Rupert & family

    Net Worth:$5.1 billion – As of March 2012

    Source: Luxury goods, inherited and growing

    Age: 61 , Citizenship: South Africa, Residence: Stellenbosch, South Africa

    Marital Status: Married, Children:3

    Johann Rupert is the second-richest person in South Africa, being worth $5.1 billion. He is the 199th richest person in the world, and made his money from Richemont, the Swiss luxury group that owns Cartier, Dunhill, Chloe bags and MontBlanc pens. The company purchased online fashion portal Net-a-Porter. Remgro, his South African holding company purchased VenFin earlier in 2010. He also owns Rupert & Rothschild and L’Ormarins wine estates, and one of South Africa’s most exclusive golf clubs.

    Now -i hope these silly propaganda punks with silly distorted figures simply shut to fug up-you cnt identify tiyr self because you'e a fake jack ass!

    Reply
  10. Ann_Garrison

    I think that nonviolence is not only right, but always most effective. Gandhi and Dr. King were right about that. There is no point in taking up arms against a heavily armed state security force. But I don't find the video link convincing one way or another; whoever made it could have easily used the footage to impose their own story.

    What I do find convincing is a photo essay I saw of the miners' desperate living conditions – shacks barely held together and sewage overflowing into the roads. That is the most important thing for us to understand from where Renaldo and I are responding, in the U.S. The multibillion dollar Lonmin Corporation was forcing its workers to live in these conditions to save about $34 million a year.

    Reply
  11. renaldo ricketts

    Ann -exactly we're dealing with a regime who feel the workers are expendable,the deplorable conditions are part of the abusive system of degraditaion. I saw this in Mexico in San Quintin, the workers lived in makeshift shacks,no running water,and dirt floors. This type of exploitations is common in Latin Amerika and many parts of th world, the people sub-exist on starvation wages. They are cultural slaves, the children work in the fields to help their parents, no schooling. The plantation then turns around and sell them good at inflated prices securing another generation of servitude. This is how the corporate structure of slavery is instituted world wide, it's genrational. The gov .S.A is a ceremonial body of elite Blacks who get paid to maintiaihn the status quo. Mandela was an empty shell, they brought in for symbolic posturing . Now that sactions have been lifted ,and the appearance of Black political power is a non reality . This is first class fraud ,the De Beers and Oppenheimers have a vast plantation to abuse for generations s to come. The truth should be told about the facade of S.Africa and the gran lie they tell the world .

    Reply
    1. tired

      What you folks don't seem to get is that the problem is not on the blue collar level — it is those sitting at Union Building making the big boy decisions, who just don't care about the rest of the population — to qoute an old favorite line "it doesn't matter if you are black or white." The more they can horde for themselves the better….Ann, it is not just the living conditions of those miners, you have little shack villages like that all over South Africa, some black, some white…some black and white. These miners make R10,000 a month — most than most blue collar workers make, and they can help themselves building better places to live. The sewage overflowing in the roads, is not the mining company's problem to deal with — it is the Government….but because they don't have to be driven through those streets in their flashy BMW's or Mercedes' with 10 escort cars, they don't care. Let's really lay the blame where it belongs…..poor management by a Government who is out to serve only themselves!

      Reply

Leave a Reply

BayView Classifieds - ads, opportunities, announcements
San Francisco Comcast