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10 Black child geniuses you should know

June 28, 2013

by Amir Shaw

If you only watched the evening news or depended on pop culture to paint a picture of young Blacks, you would probably think that the majority of Black youngsters were only ambitious about sports and music – or caught up in crime and debauchery.

However, the face of Black success isn’t limited to the fields that are occupied by Jay-Z, Beyonce and LeBron James. There are a multitude of young Blacks who are achieving at a high level in science, math, classical music, chess and other knowledge-based areas and preparing to change society.

Stephen R. Stafford II
Stephen R. Stafford II

Stephen entered Morehouse College at the age of 11 and picked up three majors. Now 16, he is currently studying computer science and mathematics. He will likely graduate at 17.

 

Mabou Loiseau
Mabou Loiseau

By the age of 7, Loiseau spoke French, Creole, Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic and Russian. She also plays the harp, clarinet, violin, drums, guitar and piano.

 

Andrew Koonce
Andrew Koonce

Andrew is a master violinist based out of Atlanta. He was named concertmaster of the Georgia Music Association’s All-State Middle School Orchestra. The title goes to the most skilled musician in the section.

 

Autum Ashante
Autum Ashante

Raised by a single father, Autum was ridiculed by highly regarded conservatives at the age of 7 for writing a poem that highlighted the travesty of slavery. Autum never wavered and mastered languages such as Arabic, Swahili and Spanish. She scored 149 on the standard IQ test. At age 13, she was accepted into the University of Connecticut.

 

Imafidon family
Imafidon family

The Imafidon family is known as the smartest family in the U.K. The youngest siblings, Peter and Paula, made history by becoming the youngest students to enroll in secondary school. Their older sister, Anne-Marie, was the youngest student to pass A-level computing at the age of 13.

 

Rochelle Ballantyne
Rochelle Ballantyne

At 17, Rochelle Ballantyne is one of the top chess players in the world. She is currently on the verge of becoming the first Black American female to earn the title of chess master.

 

Ginger Howard
Ginger Howard

Ginger Howard is the youngest Black American woman to become a pro golfer. Howard is competing to become the fifth Black American woman to join the LPGA Tour.

 

Tony Hansberry II
Tony Hansberry II

Tony used failure as inspiration. After he didn’t place in the eighth grade science fair, Tony interned at Shands Hospital and developed a method of reducing the amount of time it takes to perform hysterectomies and potentially reducing the risk of complications after the procedure. He was honored for his contributions.

 

Chelsea Dock
Chelsea Dock

Chelsea has been an accomplished pianist since the age of 5. Now 13, Chelsea has performed at Madison Square Garden, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Steinway Hall. She’s also an artist and straight A student.

 

Daquan Chisholm
Daquan Chisholm

Daquan created a walkie-talkie, bulletproof helmet at the age of 12. He’s currently working with Johns Hopkins University to gather funding to patent the idea.

Amir Shaw is a filmmaker and music and sports director for Rolling Out magazine. Follow him on Twitter @arshaw. This story first appeared in Rolling Out.

 

166 thoughts on “10 Black child geniuses you should know

  1. Leger

    I’m very proud of those young’s bright , intelligent blacks child, I know for sure there’s a lot of them out there, who not let intimated by the vast music’s industry corruptions this day. It seems like our young black people being spoils too easy, too quick by those rich Rappers.

    Reply
  2. Marion Slusher

    This information should be posted over the airwaves to encourage our youths who believes there is no hope and that coming from asingle parent home makes them doomed. Cheers to our little black geniuses

    Reply
  3. Donna Rosenthal

    I love reading about these wonderful young people. So tired of reading about gangs. Maybe we should try to put pictures and stories about these young people on the walls of junior highs and high schools instead of sports Herod or movie stars.

    Reply
  4. Beverly Jean Burris

    These are remarkable children and they need to be seriously protected at all times. I am so proud of our black babies and wish for them the freedom to constantly excel … explore, discover, research/experiment and invent… this is solid proof that history does repeat itself… the original Kings & Queens would be proud !!!

    Reply
  5. Garyslimmoore

    Black History Month is just around the corner. This post is sent to take a bite out of ignorance and stereotyping. Its better to be informed than to live a life of ignorance…So here they are, and these kids aren't wrapping or pulling off the latest dance moves, oh no. Their doing what Hollywood suggests isn't happening!!!Using their brains and God given talents!!!!!Love it!!!!

    Reply
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  7. -Nate

    VERY good news here ! .

    Children are our greatest resources .

    Keep spreading the good word ! .

    -Nate

    Reply

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