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Struggling together for racial justice in prison and society

July 29, 2013

by Abdul Olugbala Shakur

Abdul Olugbala Shakur 121412, web
Abdul Olugbala Shakur in a photo taken Dec. 14, 2012
For the past 23 years, a pattern of racial discrimination has reared its ugly head. Its presence is vividly clear, a procedural manifestation within the protocols of official sanctioned practice here at Pelikkkan Bay, which simply means the inherent propensity to discriminate against New Afrikan prisoners. This antiquated evil is still prevalent in today’s society and magnified ten-fold within the concrete confines of the U.S. penal system. The U.S. Prison Industrial Slave Complex (PISC) epitomizes this deplorable code of conduct.

We can concede to the assessment that the socio-demography contributes to and facilitates the perpetuation of racial discrimination and repression, being that the vast majority of U.S. prisons are located in white rural areas where New Afrikan people are only an image on the 6 o’clock news. It is inevitable that racism flourishes in these rural, isolated areas.

Many of the local citizens are hired to work in these prisons and they don’t leave their racist biases, beliefs, prejudices, attitudes and stereotypes at home. They import these racist principles within an already racist-based institution. These principles manifest themselves in many ways and are clearly characterized within the PISC’s discriminatory treatment towards New Afrikan prisoners, especially as it pertains to the censorship of our political ideas and beliefs and our history.

As New Afrikan prisoners, every aspect of who we are as a people – which encompasses our cultural traits – is subjugated to a scrutiny that is intrinsically rooted in a racist paradigm. People, our struggle for racial justice doesn’t stop at the prison gates; in fact, the Prison Industrial Slave Complex represents only a microcosm of the battle that we as a people are engaged in within society at large.

The vast majority of U.S. prisons are located in white rural areas where New Afrikan people are only an image on the 6 o’clock news. It is inevitable that racism flourishes in these rural, isolated areas.

Unfortunately, there are those who attempt to depreciate the legitimacy of our struggle behind enemy lines as if this is only about prison living conditions. The PISC is but another instrument designed to perpetuate our racial oppression. I just wanted to take this brief opportunity to remind our people that we are fighting the same battle. Institutionalized racism is still prevalent in today’s society and it is going to take a concerted effort to guarantee our victory.

People, our struggle for racial justice doesn’t stop at the prison gates; in fact, the Prison Industrial Slave Complex represents only a microcosm of the battle that we as a people are engaged in within society at large.

We believe that we have developed a blueprint – the New Afrikan Community Security Protocol Mandate – that has the potential to stabilize our communities in preparation for our New Afrikan revolution. A copy of this mandate can be obtained via akilishakur@gmail.com. They are requesting a $7 donation to help with photocopying and postage. Brotha Akili, along with others, is presently coordinating a multi-state campaign designed to stabilize our communities, an endeavor worthy of your support and participation.

Send our brother some love and light: Abdul Olugbala Shakur (J. Harvey), C-48884, PBSP SHU, D1-119, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City, CA 95532.

 

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