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Advocates call budget plans to open new prison beds a major contradiction

January 9, 2014

by Californians United for a Responsible Budget

Sacramento – Gov. Brown’s 2014-15 budget will contract 5,633 new prison beds in state while funding the expansion of four new prisons and allocating $500 million for more jail construction. Advocates celebrate a series of parole reform victories outlined in the proposed budget while pointing out that lifting some of their extreme limitations could easily prevent Gov. Brown’s costly prison expansion plans.

California Medical Facility expansion Vacaville 011312 by Lea Suzuki, SF Chron
Unemployed construction workers appreciate the jobs created by prison expansion, but is this the way to solve California’s housing crisis? Gov. Brown’s push to house more prisoners, despite the federal court order to reduce the prison population, shows that the prison guards’ union, CCPOA, is once again the most powerful lobby in the state. More prisoners mean more guards and more power. – Photo: Lea Suzuki, SF Chronicle
“These modest parole reforms are an important victory that communities have been fighting for years to implement. However, the state’s restrictions on the reforms will significantly decrease the number of people they impact, which is ludicrous given their plans to build more state prisons, bankroll county jail expansions and continue to send more people to contract prisons,” said Debbie Reyes of the California Prison Moratorium Project.

“Gov. Brown is wasting billions of dollars and thousands of lives to expand a system he easily could be shrinking.” The proposed reforms include elder parole, good-time credits for second strikers, an expansion to medical parole and a requirement for mandatory split sentencing.

Despite a decline of 40,000 people in California prisons in the past six years, the state has not enjoyed a proportionate drop in prison spending and shows a continued growth. Gov. Brown’s 2014-15 budget pumps up the Corrections budget from $9.2 to $9.8 billion.

Misty Rojo of the California Coalition for Women Prisoners says, “There are two obvious steps that we need to take: Change the stupid and inhumane sentencing laws that built the over-sized prison system and begin closing prisons so we can realize real budget savings to shift to important state programs.”

Advocates celebrate a series of parole reform victories outlined in the proposed budget while pointing out that lifting some of their extreme limitations could easily prevent Gov. Brown’s costly prison expansion plans.

The budget assumes that the court will grant a two-year extension to meet the 137.5 percent cap; and if the extension isn’t granted, the state will spend $315 million on contracting more prison beds to avoid releasing prisoners. Corrections Secretary Beard said the extension would give the state time to build cells for nearly 3,500 additional prisoners.

CURB will join the California Partnership and other anti-prison and anti-poverty groups on Friday, Jan. 10, to discuss Gov. Brown’s proposed 2014-15 state budget at five press conferences across the state.

New prison construction is expected to cost $810 million, a figure expected to almost double with interest payments. Operating the new cells will add more than $100 million a year to the state’s Corrections budget, plus bond repayment costs.

Budget cartoon 0114 Gov. Brown said 2013-'We can't pour more and more dollars down the rat hole of incarceration' by Noah Miska of Sin Barras
Gov. Brown seems to have forgotten that during last year’s budget release, he said, “We can’t pour more and more dollars down the rat hole of incarceration.” – Cartoon: Noah Miska, Sin Barras
An additional delay would give the state time to open Dewitt Nelson, an expansion of the Stockton medical facility to house about 1,100 mentally ill prisoners. Last week the state also detailed plans to build housing units over the next two and a half years at the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility in San Diego and Mule Creek State Prison in Ione, to hold a combined 2,376 prisoners. The budget also announces a new plan to activate the Northern California Reentry Facility, a 600-bed facility in Stockton, that will cost $8.3 million to design in 2014.

“This budget has none of the major restorations to health and human services that California desperately needs, and instead ‘restores’ closed prison beds and plans to open thousands of new ones,” says Diana Zuñiga, statewide field organizer of Californians United for a Responsible Budget. “To restore our most vital programs and rebuild poor communities and communities of color in California, we have to act now to make serious cuts to the Corrections budget.”

CURB will join the California Partnership and other anti-prison and anti-poverty groups on Friday, Jan. 10, to discuss Gov. Brown’s proposed 2014-15 state budget at five press conferences across the state:

CURB can be reached at 1322 Webster St., Suite 210, Oakland, CA 94612, (510) 435-1176, Californians United for a Responsible Budget, emily@curbprisonspending.org, http://twitter.com/CURB_Prisons or @curbprisons #cabudget #RoadOutOfPoverty.

 

2 thoughts on “Advocates call budget plans to open new prison beds a major contradiction

  1. Pray4Peace

    We build 'em and then we fill 'em. Adding more prison cells/beds does nothing to encourage reasonable sentencing and alternative punishment that has better outcomes and cost tax payers far less.

    Reply
  2. Nigger

    Kill the niggers!!!!! White Power!!!!!!! You Niggers all need to go back to Africa and get AIDs when you fuck monkeys!!!!!!

    Reply

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