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The Richmond Housing Authority crisis and the big picture – connecting the dots

February 22, 2014

by Richmond Vice Mayor Jovanka Beckles

Richmond, Calif. – There has been a great deal of attention directed toward Richmond’s Housing Authority after recent negative media coverage alleging gross mismanagement. Although there have been challenges to the truthfulness and questions about the accuracy in the reporting, what we know for certain is that real harm was done, and we must take the health and wellbeing of our residents as seriously as we do our own.

Richmond Housing Authority Hacienda Development 0214 by KQED
Richmond Housing Authority’s Hacienda Development is where many of the maintenance and management problems have been reported. – Photo: KQED
Blame can be spread far and wide – including, but not limited to the city staff and the City Council that acts as the Housing Authority Board. I was surprised and outraged by the allegations I heard, as I had previously been aware only of financial troubles, not the accompanying health, safety and sanitation issues.

I of course accept partial accountability and I absolutely believe that we must take the matter seriously and immediately do our due diligence in addressing all of the concerns raised. The residents of our public housing deserve that much respect and action on our part at a minimum.

To ensure sustainable solutions, it is critical to find the systemic underlying causes and to make both the short and long term changes necessary. Although it is premature to say what the ultimate outcome will be, I support the full independent investigation that Richmond Mayor and Housing Authority Board Chair Gayle McLaughlin has called for.

I appreciate the independent press, and I support the right of the people to know what is going on. I also recognize that reporting outrageous acts of mismanagement, deplorable living conditions and finger pointing make for good press, but there is a bigger picture and another story that is not being told.

That story is one of income inequality, historic and systemic oppression, poverty, racism, classism and the politics of economics that contribute to the resulting problems. Because the full truth is complex and neither sensational nor simple, that story does not fit neatly into a sound bite that tugs at heart strings or elicits indignant gasps.

Local governments all over the country are being asked to do more with less and are then held accountable for all the things that can and do go wrong. Of course, we and they must take some responsibility, but under the circumstances, some of the responsibility must also be fairly shared and things must ultimately shift.

Chevron refinery, Richmond, children playing
In Richmond, a largely working class and low income city, tensions run high between progressives who champion economic equity and environmental justice and, on the other side, advocates for the dominant industry, the huge Chevron refinery, who demonstrate disdain for the people’s aspirations for good health, housing and jobs.
As income inequality has dramatically increased, we have witnessed the systematic shredding of the social safety net. There are constant cutbacks in funds, often resulting in cutbacks in staff and lowered morale for the staff in place. This results in far reaching systemic problems.

These are the real and concrete consequences of the austerity measures national and state governments have been promoting and enacting. When an agency is working with limited resources, where there is not enough to cover basic needs, it is fertile ground for discontent, low morale, corruption and incompetence.

Not many competent people want to stay at a job they are expected to do but can’t do well for lack of resources. This does not in any way excuse the alleged rude or disrespectful treatment of residents. Quite the contrary. Neither does it justify unresponsive department action.

But unless we start dealing with the underlying issue of poverty, finding people jobs and rebuilding the safety net, there is no real or lasting solution. All other efforts are simply bandaids and cosmetics.

One of the many reasons that I am promoting an increase in the minimum wage here in Richmond is to make a local attempt to create a livable wage for workers and to begin to decrease the ever widening income disparity – including in this case those who may happen to be public housing residents, as well as those who provide any number of services to the residents and, of course, all other workers.

Everyone deserves a chance at a decent life and a decent place to live. I also believe that, given a choice, workers prefer to work with integrity.

Unless we start dealing with the underlying issue of poverty, finding people jobs and rebuilding the safety net, there is no real or lasting solution.

The current economy does not support living wages that provide a sufficient income to many individuals to make a living and afford market rate housing. As long as income disparity remains egregiously high, people will struggle with housing and there will be public housing. As long as there is public housing, we the stewards of the public funds must be vigilant in ensuring that it is responsibly and respectfully managed.

The City Council alone cannot remedy the larger issue of national economic disparity and income inequality. Fortunately, organized communities can and are fighting for justice and equity in these areas.

As long as income disparity remains egregiously high, people will struggle with housing and there will be public housing. As long as there is public housing, we the stewards of the public funds must be vigilant in ensuring that it is responsibly and respectfully managed.

I stand with my colleagues and the community in the belief that government works for and with the people. I welcome ongoing dialogue on this issue and look forward to discovering what more will be revealed. I will continue to initiate and support public policies for appropriate and necessary action for the good of the residents of Richmond, California.

Richmond Vice Mayor Jovanka Beckles, also a member of the Richmond City Council, works full time as a mental health specialist for Contra Costa County. She was born in Panama City, where she grew up in a bilingual, multicultural household. Her parents moved to the United States in1972, and she has lived in Richmond for the last 13 years. She can be reached at Jovankabeckles@gmail.com.

 

2 thoughts on “The Richmond Housing Authority crisis and the big picture – connecting the dots

  1. Eduardo

    Thank you for your focus on the problem and not on blame as some council members are want to do. By addressing the problem, we are more able to find solutions; my diverting our attention to blame, we waste precious time finding solutions to pressing problems: the immediate transfer of the residents to healthy housing and a long term solution to our broken system that creates such conditions.

    Reply

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