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‘Concerning Violence’ screening at Qilombo Friday

May 18, 2016

'Concerning Violence' film graphic

by The People’s Minister of Information JR

During the Black Power Movement, Imam Jamil Al-Amin, formerly known as H. Rap Brown, was quoted as saying at a Free Huey rally in Oakland that “violence is as American as apple pie.”

Considering the creation of the New World, the genocidal extermination of hundreds of millions of Indigenous people from Canada to Argentina, and the transatlantic slave trade known as the Maafa, which brought hundreds of millions of Africans to the Americas to slave for the enrichment of European imperialist countries, this loaded statement actually gave a history lesson on what violence means in this hemisphere.

In 2009-10, there were a number of demonstrations and rebellions protesting police terrorism in the Black community of Oakland, after the televised execution of Oscar Grant.

The mainstream corporate media started tagging the demonstrations and rebellions as “violent” although most of the rage was aimed at cars and buildings, not people. The social novocain took effect when family members of police terrorism victims started using the vocabulary of the police and asking for people “not to be violent” when protesting, euphemistically meaning that the state wants us to protest in a uniform way, non-threatening to business.

In 2009-10, there were a number of demonstrations and rebellions protesting police terrorism in the Black community of Oakland, after the televised execution of Oscar Grant. The mainstream corporate media started tagging them as “violent” although most of the rage was aimed at cars and buildings, not people.

In many ways this confused people as to what side family members were on. Rebels did not kill their loved one; the police did. That is where the violence started, but people conveniently ignore that part, because it is more psychologically comforting to think that the people are unruly and maniacal, instead of considering the fact that we live in a terrorist state as targets, where police wantonly and routinely kill young innocent Black people – and get away with it.

It is more psychologically comforting to think that the people are unruly and maniacal, instead of considering the fact that we live in a terrorist state as targets, where police wantonly and routinely kill young innocent Black people – and get away with it.

This recent local history and the need for political education and dialogue is the fuel that inspired this upcoming Friday’s movie screening of “Concerning Violence,” a documentary exploring the literary classic of Frantz Fanon, “The Wretched of the Earth,” in the context of a number of African freedom struggles, including those of Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau.

We will talk about the definition of violence as well as the root of political violence at the discussion following the film. All are invited.

“Concerning Violence” is a documentary exploring the literary classic of Frantz Fanon, “The Wretched of the Earth,” in the context of a number of African freedom struggles. We will talk about the definition of violence as well as the root of political violence at the discussion following the film.

“Concerning Violence” will screen this Friday, May 20, at the Qilombo on 2313 San Pablo Ave. in West Oakland at 6:30 p.m. All are welcome.

The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey is associate editor of the Bay View, author of “Block Reportin’” and “Unfinished Business: Block Reportin’ 2” and filmmaker of “Operation Small Axe” and “Block Reportin’ 101,” available, along with many more interviews, at www.blockreportradio.com. He can be reached at blockreportradio@gmail.com.

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