Support SF BayView
Donate or Subscribe to SF Bay View
Follow Us Twitter Facebook

Prison Stories

“Black August” – how many of these people and their stories do you know? Black August is a good time to get better acquainted. – Art: Kevin “Rashid” Johnson, 1859887, Clements Unit, 9601 Spur 591, Amarillo TX 79107, who is minister of defense for the New Afrikan Black Panther Party Prison Chapter

Remember Black August and the people’s martyrs

July 31, 2015

My sisters and brothers and all New Afrikan Black Panther Party comrades, we are coming up on our 11th anniversary of Black August. As the NABPP-PC minister of justice, I take observance of Black August very seriously. Many people have been killed or placed into prison in our struggle. Let us not be slack in honoring them. Let us rise together to break our chains of injustice and slavery! We will not have any peace until there is justice!

No comments yet
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
Black Panther newspaper editors, in the Aug. 28, 1971, issue, the first after George Jackson’s assassination, urged readers to keep his spirit alive. In prisons throughout California and the U.S. and in the hearts of freedom-loving people everywhere, that spirit thrives.

On visiting George

July 29, 2015

George Jackson was a legendary prisoner who was attempting to organize the Blacks, Latinos and poor whites under their common linkage as victims of an exploitative class system. At that time, he was incarcerated in the San Quentin Adjustment Center, which housed the prison’s most feared and dangerous inmates. The Adjustment Center also housed the political prisoners.

“Peace in Our Hoods” – Art: Roger “Rab” Moore, G-02296, HDSP Z-168, P.O. Box 3030, Susanville CA 96127

Manifesto on rebuilding New Afrikan people, families and communities

July 28, 2015

I introduce this manifesto to all New Afrikans (i.e. Blacks) and any human beings who are SERIOUS about changing the inhumane living conditions that we see the people being subjected to in oppressed, impoverished communities throughout Amerika. It is crucial that we assess our conditions based on what is in our power to do, opposed to what someone can do for us.

No comments yet
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
“The Agreement to End Hostilities” – Art: Michael D. Russell, C-90473, PBSP SHU D7-217, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City CA 95532

We can’t breathe! Thoughts on our Agreement to End Hostilities

July 25, 2015

The Webster’s New Universal Unabridged Dictionary defines the word “hostility” as 1) a hostile state, condition or attitude; enmity; antagonism; unfriendliness; 2) a hostile act; 3) Opposition or resistance to an idea, plan project, etc.; 4) acts of warfare; 5) war. So our initial question to the people is: “What does hostility mean to you?”

1 comment so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
From the report: “The TDCJ also fails to provide effective medical care for its inmates. … The TDCJ neither monitors these inmates nor provides them with adequate living conditions to prevent suffering and death during the summer months. Indeed, all 14 inmates who have died since 2007 under the care of the TDCJ suffered from pre-existing medical conditions exacerbated by the heat … Five of the deceased spent less than a single week in custody before succumbing to the dangerously high temperatures in Texas facilities. … Even where the TDCJ has issued specific standards to protect heat-sensitive inmates, such as in work or recreation areas, the TDCJ fails to actually implement these standards.” – Photo: Lauren Schneider

‘TDCJ placed me in harm’s way because I spoke out in reference to the extreme heat’

July 19, 2015

Greetings, brothers and sisters. This year in Texas we have seen a marked increase in the exposure of heinous acts of abuse and mis­treatment perpetrated by state employees who work for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Behind the scenes, the prisoners responsible for this massive movement to combat injustice have be­come victims of retaliation and harassment at the hands of prison officials and, elected state government officials.

1 comment so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
Responding to the movement begun by the California prisoners’ hunger strikes in 2011 and 2013 to stop mass incarceration and longterm solitary confinement, President Obama became the first sitting president to visit a federal prison, where he met with a group of prisoners. Afterward, he asked Attorney General Loretta Lynch to “start a review of the overuse of solitary confinement across American prisons.” Accompanying the president is Federal Bureau of Prisons Direct Charles Samuels (right). – Photo: NBC News

While counting President Obama’s NAACP speech and prison visit as big wins, let us keep fighting

July 18, 2015

On Tuesday, July 14, one day after commuting the sentences of 46 people currently serving sentences for nonviolent drug offenses in federal prisons, President Obama addressed the NAACP National Convention in Philadelphia. In his address, the president declared that our criminal justice system is “built on the legacy of slavery, segregation and other structural inequalities that [have] compounded over generations.” Our current system, the president said, is “not an accident.”

No comments yet
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
“Support Our Fight to End Solitary Confinement” – Art: Michael D. Russell, C-90473, PBSP SHU D7-217, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City CA 95532

Pelican Bay Hunger Strike: Four years and still fighting

July 14, 2015

Four years ago prisoners in California – led by those in the control units of Pelican Bay – organized a hunger strike to demand an end to the torturous conditions of solitary confinement. Two more strikes would follow, with over 30,000 prisoners taking united action in the summer of 2013 – both in isolation and in general population in nearly every California prison. Current prison organizing continues a historic legacy of struggle.

1 comment so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
Called “Chicago shows love to Jon Burge torture victims,” supporters staged a dramatic demonstration in the snow on Feb. 14, 2015, as Chicago deliberated reparations. The long line named 118 victims, including Aaron Patterson. – Photo: Sarah Jane Rhee

Attorney Demitrus Evans on the case of political prisoner Aaron Patterson

July 9, 2015

I caught up with Aaron Patterson’s lawyer, attorney Demitrus Evans, to get the story firsthand. This will be the first in a series of stories that I am working on to expose the cases of current day Black political prisoners in this country, because it is very important that our people know the truth about how this government deals with the people who truly do work on behalf of our empowerment.

1 comment so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

The Black ones too

July 1, 2015

During the recent events surrounding the murder of unarmed Black males by white police officers in this country, it has been pointed out, and correctly so, that America has a steep and tortured history concerning the murders of Blacks by whites – legally and illegally! But what has for the most part been left out of this real life and death conversation is the fact that Black police officers have done, and are still doing, the same thing as their white police partners.

Message to Black youth

June 30, 2015

Primacy should be given to an understanding of the material fact we are all one family. Our relations are consanguineous (related by blood) stemming from our common Afrikan ancestry. Each of you constitutes one link in the great chain that is representative of the whole, i.e., the family, which is also our New Afrikan (Black) Nation.

Proposition 47: The clock is ticking to apply for relief

June 29, 2015

By now, there’s a good chance that you’ve heard of Proposition 47 (Prop 47). With more than 3,200 people released from state prisons and 115,000 petitions filed under the law within the first six months of its passage, Prop 47 is likely the most significant reform to California criminal justice policy since 2011’s Realignment. It is critical that individuals with eligible criminal convictions act quickly because the law created only a three-year application window.

3 comments so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
“Censorship” – Art: Michael D. Russell, Pelican Bay

New California prison censorship rules ban ‘Windows 7 for Seniors for Dummies’ and ‘Your Child’s Development from Birth to Adolescence’ as too hot for prisoners

June 28, 2015

On April 30, the Office of Administrative Law gave the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation its approval on amended censorship regulations proposed by the department over a year ago. The amended regulations as approved and now in effect are essentially identical to those the department originally put forward on March 25, 2014, which drew sharp public criticism.

5 comments so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
“Bidness Etc” illustration of Abbvie Pharmaceuticals Limited’s success at capturing market share with its Hep C cure, Viekira Pak, Feb. 2015

US prisoners sue for constitutional right to lifesaving Hep C cure

June 27, 2015

Attorneys filed lawsuits in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts this week on behalf of prisoners who say they’re being denied new lifesaving treatment for Hepatitis C because of the cost of the drugs. Gilead Sciences manufactures two versions of the cure, Harvoni and Sovaldi. Abbvie Pharmaceutical Limited, formerly Abbot Labs, manufactures another, Viekira Pak. The cost of any one of the three is roughly $90,000.

6 comments so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

CCI Step Down Program is bogus

June 27, 2015

I have taken the position to shut down this fake SDP (Step Down Program) crap. So all of Step 4, who have the most to lose – we all agree that these latest types of 115s, or RVRs (CDCR Form 115, Rules Violation Reports), are just another way to keep us held in SHU or a means of bringing us back once we make it out to the General Population mainline, and we’d rather take our stance now!

This 1968 poster shows John Clutchette, George Jackson and Fleeta Drumgo being escorted by guards.

Soledad Brother John Clutchette asks for your help

June 26, 2015

I have read your publication periodically over the years, and after some discussion with fellow prisoners, it was suggested I seek your assistance with getting the message out there that I need help! The enclosed documents tell a lot of the story of what I’ve been up against for years. Most of my support system has died – mother, wife, daughter and sister. The Brother Keith Wattley took my case and fought it to a short lived victory.

No comments yet
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

Unity between races is going strong; be proud of yourselves!

June 25, 2015

The End of Hostilities between races within the California prison system went into effect in 2012. Since that time, I am amazed at how the different races have worked diligently to unify with one another despite a few little hickups here and there. You all should be proud of yourselves for what you have been able to accomplish in such a very short period of time.

Rev. Pinkney, hero of Benton Harbor, speaks from prison

June 25, 2015

If we assume that life is worth living and that man has a right to survive, I will say the body of assorted judges, prosecutors and politicians must be held accountable for their wrongdoing – their action and inaction. We must find a right alternative to injustice in America. Rev. Edward Pinkney has been deprived of his liberty for the last six months. He sits in prison falsely accused of vote fraud, separated from loved ones and community.

1 comment so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

Strange fruit

June 23, 2015

The cherry blossoms with a bullet in its pit because its roots have been watered by the muffled screams of slaves hanging from its branches … A child plants a prayer in the garden of his mother’s mind next to his father’s broken dreams; she raises him on bitter milk and cold cereal: a meal she deems fitting to prepare him for the world. I sometimes wonder if Trayvon Martin and Oscar Grant are in heaven writing an epistle to the people on the same bullet?

After the Civil War, to maintain slavery, Black people, including children like these, were convicted of bogus crimes and forced to work for free. Just like today. Isn’t it time to end slavery?

We must leave the crops in the field

June 23, 2015

We have an opportunity to confront ourselves realistically, to have a stake in a real opportunity for freedom. The only way we can have an impact on the system is to make their oppression of us a financial burden that diminishes their profits rather than increases them. If they use the profits from your labor to write laws to keep you in prison, what does it profit you to work for them? If they intend for you to rot away in a cell, then let their crops rot away in the fields!

Anthony Robinson Jr. 2015, web cropped

The New Underground Railroad Movement

June 23, 2015

The New Underground Railroad Movement is a grassroots inside-outside organization that recognizes that the institutionalization of mass incarceration is the greatest civil rights and social issue we are faced with today. The New Underground Railroad Movement is dedicated to shutting down the “prison industrial complex” through tactical, organizational and grassroots work strikes, boycotts and class conscious empowerment.

1 comment so far
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
BayView Classifieds - ads, opportunities, announcements

TOP STORES
RingCentral
Rebtel
Phone.com
ProfilesinJustice
free help with law paper writing
Emerging
Media Institute
Сhristinerice-freelancewriter.com
Freelance Writing,
Tips and Tutorials.