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California and the U.S.

Skepticism growing toward ‘twin tunnels’ project: Gov. Brown’s Bay Delta Conservation Plan in hot water

May 7, 2014

By now, most California residents have heard about Gov. Jerry Brown’s plan to construct two 40-foot diameter peripheral tunnels 150-feet below the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the state’s largest and most critical water supply. The Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP), estimated to cost between $25 and $67 billion, has been under intense scrutiny from local and congressional lawmakers, Delta residents, farmers and fishermen.

Amina, Ras, Amiri Baraka, web

Ras Baraka, son of famed poet Amiri Baraka, fights a historic tide in Newark mayoral race

May 7, 2014

History keeps colliding with the present as Ras Baraka, a Newark city councilperson and city school principal, is exactly one week away from finding out if he will become mayor of Newark, New Jersey’s largest city. Baraka is accusing his opponent, Seton Hall University Law School professor Shavar Jeffries, of openly being supported by outsiders who are attempting to buy the Newark election.

The National Afrikan-Amerikan Family Reunion Association: NAAFRA Time

May 3, 2014

The motivation to organize the National Afrikan-Amerikan Family Reunion Association, NAAFRA, a family movement in-gathering all New Afrikan families with reunions and those not yet experiencing the joy of reunion activity in their family into a single family movement charged with the fire of change and coming forward with a passion of love and pride in being Afrikan.

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Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter, web

Remembering the Hurricane: Rubin Carter

April 30, 2014

For a man who spent nearly four decades of his 76 years under the restrictive eye of the U.S. correctional system, few have ever touched as many lives as Rubin “Hurricane” Carter. The world-class boxer turned wrongfully accused prisoner, turned advocate for the rights of the unjustly incarcerated, has succumbed to cancer, but his memory and work will endure as long as there are people outside and inside the prisons of the world fighting for justice.

Chokwe Antar Lumumba

Chokwe Antar Lumumba doesn’t need City Hall to lead Jackson, Miss., into new era

April 28, 2014

In African lore, rain means good fortune. So when Chokwe Antar Lumumba announced that he was running to fill his father’s mayoral seat on a rainy day in March, it was reassurance that The People’s Movement would forge ahead. Still grieving for his father, Chokwe Antar strapped a city, a people, The People, on his back and vowed to fight for the progress set into motion by Chokwe Lumumba and the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement. And though Chokwe Antar lost the mayoral election in a close run-off on April 22, he understands, just as his father before him, that one battle does not decide the war.

Rev. Edward Pinkney speaks Detroit by (c) Daymon J. Hartley, web

Civil rights fighter Rev. Pinkney arrested on trumped-up charges of election fraud for mayoral recall

April 27, 2014

Benton Harbor reminds me of Mississippi in the late 1950s and early 1960s. I have never been one to rave about how much progress my generation has made, but I had hoped to see an end to these horrors in my lifetime. All citizens have the civil right to recall an elected official or initiate a referendum by way of petition. This is our only outlet. Berrien County sheriffs are intimidating, harassing and using Gestapo tactics to infringe on the civil rights of citizens of Benton Harbor.

Angola prisoners return from farm work, web

UN Human Rights Committee finds US in violation on 25 counts

April 23, 2014

Recently, the U.N. Human Rights Committee issued a report excoriating the United States for its human rights violations. It focuses on violations of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which the country is party. The report mentions 25 human rights issues where the United States is failing. This piece focuses on a few of those issues – Guantanamo, NSA surveillance, accountability for Bush-era human rights violations, drone strikes, racism in the prison system, racial profiling, police violence and criminalization of the homeless.

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Memphis leads nation in use of deadly force by police, activists charge

April 16, 2014

The Memphis Black Autonomy Federation has asked the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate “a pattern or practice” of misconduct by the Memphis Police Department. Memphis police killed 23 people in 2012 and 2013 – the largest number of people killed by police in this time period in America, the federation maintains.

Chokwe Lumumba at press conf Jackson, Miss. by Rogelio V. Solis, AP, web

Chokwe Lumumba: Dare to struggle, dare to win!

April 7, 2014

On March 8, hundreds of people, especially from the South and particularly Jackson, Miss., came to mourn and reflect on the life of Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, who died suddenly on Feb. 25 at the age of 66. Starting with a March 5 tribute at the historically Black college, Jackson State University, Mayor Lumumba’s life was memorialized for several days, ending with the masses lining the streets for his burial motorcade. A collection of tributes to the late great mayor of Jackson, Miss.

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Take our Obamacare survey – after you sign up by Monday

March 27, 2014

The deadline to choose a health plan for you and your family is Monday, March 31. If you’re in California, go to the website Covered California, www.coveredca.com, to sign up. (Those in other states visit www.healthcare.gov.) We at the Bay View would like to find out what our readers have experienced since the official launch of the Affordable Health Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare, in October of 2013.

Chokwe Antar Lumumba mayoral campaign posters

Support Chokwe Antar Lumumba for mayor of Jackson, Miss.

March 20, 2014

The election is on April 8, and without the funds needed to support Antar’s campaign today, we risk the gains made in the city – not just the infrastructure building and the spirit of cooperation but the work done in City Council, including getting the first ever anti-racial profiling ordinance passed, and all the work that is poised to happen: the economic undergirding of the most vulnerable and the fair application of the law that will ensure a truly safer city.

Debo Adegbile speaks press conf outside Supreme Court

Behind the flash mob attack on Obama’s civil rights nominee Debo Adegbile

March 8, 2014

On Wednesday, March 5, the full U.S. Senate failed on a procedural vote to support the nomination of Debo Adegbile to be the next assistant attorney general for civil rights. According to an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal, Adegbile’s representation of Mumia Abu-Jamal when he headed the NAACP LDF is reason enough to derail his nomination.

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How and why did Chokwe Lumumba die?

March 7, 2014

When a Black radical dies in Mississippi, one should never accept at face value the state’s word on the cause of death. When that revolutionary Black man dies soon after becoming mayor of the state’s capital and largest city, history and reason compel us to put assassination first on our list of possibilities.

Lawmakers bludgeon the food stamp program

February 26, 2014

Final passage of the $956 billion farm bill received bipartisan support in the Senate on Feb. 4, and soon after President Barack Obama signed the bill into law. Passage of the bill includes massive cuts to the food stamp program – Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP – that will affect around 47 million people living in poverty all across the nation.

Eric Holder

They’ve done their time, now let them vote

February 26, 2014

On Feb. 11, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. urged states to repeal laws that prohibit people who were formerly incarcerated from voting, a move that would restore the right to vote to millions. This timely announcement does not just address officials in states such as Florida or Mississippi, but has implications here at home. California is currently facing its own disenfranchisement crisis.

Jackson Rising: Building the city of the future today

February 21, 2014

Coming as the Bay View print edition goes to press is the shocking and tragic news that Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, 66, has died. With our deepest sympathy for his family and city, we send our hope that Jackson, Miss., will continue to rise. Believing that Mayor Lumumba’s plan is the best way to economic justice, peace and prosperity for every city, we carry on with our plan to publish “Jackson Rising” to encourage Jackson to carry out Lumumba’s mission, making Jackson a model for the nation. Tributes to the beloved Mayor Lumumba coming soon.

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Jordan Davis verdict: Failure to convict Michael Dunn of first degree murder a travesty that must be rectified in second trial

February 15, 2014

Today a jury found Michael Dunn guilty of three counts of attempted murder and one count of firing a deadly weapon in a November 2012 shooting which left 17-year-old Jordan Davis dead. The judge declared a mistrial on the charge of first degree murder and a retrial may be scheduled for later this year. Dunn is expected to be sentenced to at least 63 years in prison.

Flush the TPP!

February 14, 2014

Want to eat poisoned food or triple your medication costs? TPP will do that. Confused about how multinational corporations created the TPP, a Trans Pacific Partnership “trade deal” that will hurt people globally? WikiLeaks recently published two chapters of the agreement big corporations developed in years of secret talks. Before we have our say, Obama wants to Fast Track TPP through Congress. Here’s a quick summary of why we should flush the TPP.

Jasper, Texas: Feds to investigate death of Black dad whose mutilation was called ‘accidental overdose’

February 13, 2014

Alfred Wright was a 28-year-old physical therapist, a “man of great faith,” and father of three sons. He went missing for 18 days. He was found by volunteers and his father, stripped down to his shorts and one sock, with his throat cleanly slit and one ear missing. The police recorded the cause of death as “accidental drug overdose.” Alfred Wright was also a Black man married to a pretty white woman … in small-town Texas.

Toxic threats to people of color: Environmental justice leaders meet in Denver Feb. 11-12

February 11, 2014

Juan Parras explains: “Today is the 20th anniversary of Executive Order 12898 to address Environmental Justice in ‘Minority’ and Low Income Populations, issued by President Clinton. We came to Denver to celebrate our successes but, more importantly, we came because the work is far from done.” Mr. Parras and others are attending the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council (NEJAC) meeting in Denver this week.

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