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Haiti and Latin America

Supporters of Fanmi Lavalas party presidential candidate Dr. Maryse Narcisse protest recent preliminary election results in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Thursday, Nov. 12. – Photo: Dieu Nalio Chery, AP

Defiant Haiti: ‘We won’t let you steal these elections!’

November 23, 2015

Hooded gangs attacked a large demonstration against election fraud today in the Haitian capital. Haitians, determined to thwart what they see as an ongoing “electoral coup d’état,” have been in the streets almost daily in their tens of thousands since the Oct. 25 first round presidential elections. There were huge demonstrations, punctuated by police firing into the crowd, wounding several, on Nov. 18. On Nov. 1, a big election protest in the Bel Air popular district, led by a Rara band, was attacked and two marchers shot dead; later that day a third protester was ambushed and killed on the way home.

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Pras Michel discusses his film, “Sweet Micky for President,” on Good Day LA.

Pras of the Fugees talks about his new film, ‘Sweet Micky for President’ of Haiti

November 14, 2015

The Fantastic Travelling Film Circus speaks with rapper and executive producer of “Sweet Micky for President” Pras Michel, founder of the Fugees, about his new movie on how he helped to inspire Haitian singer Michel Martelly to run for president of the world’s first Black republic, Haiti. We discuss Pras’ bandmate Wyclef entering the race, Aristide, the earthquake, the Clintons, Sean Penn and much more.

Voters waited eagerly to vote in Cite Soleil on Election Day, Oct. 25. One of the poorest neighborhoods in Port au Prince, Cite Soleil, a Lavalas stronghold, teems with a million people. – Photo: John Carroll

Fact finding delegation reports an electoral coup now in process in Haiti

October 29, 2015

Following Haiti’s controversial presidential and legislative elections held on Sunday, Oct. 25, alarm is growing about irregularities in the counting of the votes at voting centers and in the transportation of votes to the tabulation center. There is widespread mistrust of the process. Most international observers of the election and subsequent press reports have focused on the day of the election but not on the counting and tabulation of the votes.

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Protesters outside a Haitian presidential debate in Miami on Oct. 4 denounce the Aug. 9 “electoral coup.” – Photo: Haiti Information Project

Election 2015: The fight for voting rights and sovereignty in Haiti

October 18, 2015

On Oct. 25, Haitians are slated to go to the polls to elect a new president and Parliament, after a disastrous first round vote for Parliament on Aug. 9, marred by Martelly government-sponsored voter suppression, violence and corruption. Amid protests and calls from thousands of demonstrators to annul the August elections, it took almost two months to announce the “winners” who will contest this Oct. 25 “run-off.”

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Jamaica Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller and British Prime Minister David Cameron embrace at the conclusion of their bilateral talks at Jamaica House on Oct. 9. – Photo: PA

David Cameron’s visit to Jamaica: Amusing and dangerous

October 11, 2015

Progressive and revolutionary groups throughout the Caribbean are sending a clear message to British Prime Minister David Cameron regarding his arrogant, condescending and contemptuous statements with regard to slavery and the issue of reparations during his recent visit to Jamaica. Cameron’s behavior shows that the British Conservative Party’s colonial mindset is still firmly in place. Read Gerald Perreira’s essay and listen to the Block Report interview, in which he delves deeper into the topics of reparations, prison and border conflict.

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Recently released dissidents Aide Gallardo and Sonia Garro hold the Cuban flag during a march in Havana Jan. 11, 2015, when Cuba freed 53 prisoners. – Photo: Reuters

Cuba to release 3,522 prisoners on the eve of Pope Francis’ visit; why can’t Obama do the same?

September 17, 2015

Just prior to the visit of Pope Francis to Cuba on Sept. 19, the Cuban government has announced the release of 3,522 people being held in the country’s jails. This humanitarian gesture will include prisoners who are over 60 years of age, younger than 20, those with chronic illnesses, women and those who are close to their release dates. Why couldn’t Obama follow the Cuban example before Pope Francis continues on his tour to the U.S. on Sept. 22?

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Dominican Republic apartheid

September 15, 2015

Haitian activist lawyer Ezili Danto speaks on the current state of Dominican apartheid and the denationalization of Haitians within its borders. “The Dominican Republic is the Israel of the Caribbean,” Danto says, noting that they sided with the Confederacy during the U.S. Civil War. “Haiti is a sanctuary for freedom, a sanctuary in a world where, when the Africans liberated the island, it was the only place on Planet Earth where slavery of Black people did not exist.”

Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is joined by her husband, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, and Sen. Pat Leahy at a new power plant during their visit to Caracol, Haiti, in 2012. This photo illustrates a Wall Street Journal article headlined: “How the Clintons Worked the Angles in Haiti: Bill handled earthquake aid while Hillary was secretary of state; the nation deserved better.” – Photo: Larry Downing, AFP

Plan Lanmó – the Death Plan: The Clintons, foreign aid and NGOs in Haiti

August 26, 2015

When Bill and Hillary Clinton married in 1975, a friend gave them a trip to Haiti for their honeymoon. The Washington Post reported: “Since that honeymoon vacation, the Caribbean island nation has held a life-long allure for the couple, a place they found at once desperate and enchanting, pulling at their emotions throughout his presidency and in her maiden year as secretary of state.”

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Ezili Danto speaks on Haitian political history

July 21, 2015

Lawyer, artist and activist Ezili Danto gives the Block Report audience a history lesson on the first republic to free itself militarily from slavery, under the direction of the first Pan African head of state, Dessalines. We are talking about none other than Haiti. She also gives us a little bit of the history of the Dominican Republic and its relationship with Haiti as well as the role that the mulatoes have played in Haitian history.

In this and the next two photos, Haitians line up to legalize their status at the Interior Ministry in Santo Domingo, on June 17, 2015. Tens of thousands of people are facing deportations as a deadline for foreigners, most of them being Haitians, to legalize their status as undocumented aliens is due to expire at midnight. – Photos: Erika Santelices, AFP

The tragic, bloody origins of the Dominican Republic’s plan to erase much of its Black population

June 17, 2015

A quarter of a million migrant Haitian workers could be deported tomorrow. Over 2,000 military soldiers have been ordered to patrol the border tomorrow as of 6:00 a.m. A 45-day grace period has been discussed to allow for those ordered to leave to collect their bearings. But make no mistake, they are being ordered to leave. The womb of Hispaniola is in pain and, by tomorrow, could be a war zone. The hate against Haitians in the Dominican Republic has become increasingly alarming. Hate crimes have been very visible, with Haitians being lynched in broad daylight.

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Venezuela President Nicolas Maduro holds a copy of the Venezuelan Constitution as he speaks to his people. – Photo: Reuters

Venezuela a threat to US national security?

March 14, 2015

On March 9, 2015, U.S. President Obama issued an executive order declaring a “national emergency” affirming that “the situation in Venezuela” poses an “unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States.” This is the latest measure of U.S. imperialist meddling in the internal affairs of a sovereign nation like the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and as such is strongly condemned by the Hands off Venezuela campaign.

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Haiti has been on the march for months. These politically astute protesters make their purpose clear. The face of the person holding the sign has been blurred to protect his identity.

With general strikes and marches, Haitians demand government by the people

March 1, 2015

The people of Haiti held a two-day general strike on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 9 and 10, as part of ongoing popular mobilizations throughout the country. They also successfully struck the week before on Feb. 2. The Martelly government responded with brutal repression in various communities such as in Montrouis, where massive use of tear gas killed two children and police gunfire wounded a number of community residents.

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Lynchings Florida 1934, Dominican Republic 2015

Haitian man lynched in Dominican Republic park

February 19, 2015

On Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2015, in the Dominican Republic, supposedly a paradise of European development, a Haitian man named Henry Claude Jean, known as “Tulile,” a humble shoe shine worker, was found hanging in a park in Santiago, his hands and feet bound. In Haiti, the U.S.-installed Martelly dictatorship and its controlled opposition remain silent about this atrocious lynching.

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In the freezing New York cold on Jan. 12, 2015, Haitians protest in front of Bill Clinton’s Harlem office, saying “No to dictatorship, down with the U.N., down with the U.S. puppet Martelly government!” – Photo: Dahoud Andre

Five years later: Haitians step up their fight for independence and democracy

January 15, 2015

Five years ago, after the catastrophic Haiti earthquake, the international community – a self-defined “Core Group” under the leadership of former President Bill Clinton – took over Haiti recovery and reconstruction and announced they would “build Haiti back better.” But this was a euphemism for land grabbing, privatization, occupation and imperial plunder. Black lives don’t matter in the United States, much less in Haiti.

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Port workers in Buenaventura, Colombia, join the worldwide Black Lives Matter protest because 80 percent of their population, which is 90 percent Black, lives in poverty.

Colombian port workers in solidarity against police violence

December 30, 2014

Today we are proud to stand with our brothers and sisters across the United States and around the world in response to the recent police killings of Eric Garner, Mike Brown and countless other victims of state violence to say that “Black lives matter.” While it should be implicit that all lives matter, communities in recent days have risen up to reinforce the fact that Black and Brown human beings have an equal place on this earth, because often times it feels that we do not.

Students and teachers celebrate after listening to a live, nationally broadcast speech by Cuba’s President Raúl Castro about the country’s restoration of relations with the United States. – Photo: Ramon Espinosa, AP

Cuban President Raúl Castro: We must learn the art of coexisting with our differences

December 17, 2014

As a result of a dialogue, which included a phone conversation I had yesterday with President Obama, we have been able to make headway on some topics of mutual interest. The last three of the Cuban 5 have arrived today to our homeland, we have sent Alan Gross back to his country and we have agreed to renew diplomatic relations. But this in no way means that the heart of the matter has been solved. The blockade must cease.

A candle-lit message “speaks.”

A silence that speaks: Ayotzinapa, the Zapatistas and the politics of listening

November 21, 2014

The disappearance of 43 students from a rural school in Ayotzinapa, Mexico, dedicated to training teachers that are mostly from indigenous communities has sparked outrage and solidarity throughout Mexico and the world. These horrible acts of violence must be understood within the context of an increasingly vile and murderous narco state.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff reviews U.N. troops in Haiti. – Photo: Blog do Planalto

Et tu, Brute? Haiti’s betrayal by Latin America

November 18, 2014

Without Haiti’s help, there would not have been any independent country in Latin America. On January 1, 1816, when Simon Bolivar arrived in Haiti, downtrodden and desperate for help to fight the Spanish, the only two republics in the Western Hemisphere were the United States, where slave ownership was in force, and Haiti, which had fought for and earned its independence in what is still the only successful slave rebellion ever in the world.

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Haitian-Americans win long awaited visa program to reunite families

October 21, 2014

Advocates of the Reunite Haitian-American Families Campaign have achieved a significant victory in the Oct. 17 Department of Homeland Security announcement of a Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program (HFRPP). Prior to this federal announcement, longstanding support for FRPP grew from key national efforts like the Reunite Haitian American Families Campaign that is sponsored by the national coalition Black Immigration Network.

Two million men gathered on the National Mall on Oct. 16, 1995, at the call of Minister Farrakhan.

Gerald Perreira, chair of Black Consciousness Movement Guyana, refused entry to Jamaica for Million Man March Commemoration

October 19, 2014

Gerald Perreira was yesterday told he must get off an aircraft in Antigua before the plane could take off. Perreira was on his way to Jamaica, where he had been invited by the Hon. Minister Louis Farrakhan to participate in the 19th anniversary of the Million Man March, on Oct. 19, at the National Arena in Kingston. He was told by the authorities in Antigua that he was removed from the flight because he had been refused permission to land in Jamaica.

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