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New Orleans

NAACP urges Congress to pass post-Katrina employment, rebuild and development legislation as people affected by Katrina and Rita continue to suffer

July 5, 2009

Four years after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita hit the Gulf Coast region, there are still numerous unmet needs and challenges facing the residents of that area every day. Especially hard hit by the hurricanes were low-income and racial and ethnic minority Americans, and they continue to suffer disproportionately.

First report since US rejoins UN Human Rights Council condemns racist denial of housing to Katrina survivors

June 15, 2009

The United Nations report, submitted by Special Rapporteur on Racism, Racial Discrimination and Xenophobia Doudou Diene, presents an overview of the United States’ compliance with international norms governing racial equality. It sets out several areas where the U.S. has failed to protect its citizens from racially discriminatory practices.

No evictions: Gulf Coast residents can keep their FEMA trailers

June 10, 2009

The move by FEMA to enforce the June 1 eviction date for Gulf Region residents who live in temporary trailers not only lacks basic compassion but is also a derogation of the government’s responsibilities to uphold fundamental human rights.

As hurricane season begins, pressure builds on Congress to pass Gulf Coast Civic Works Act

June 8, 2009

HR 2269, which is co-sponsored by 16 Congress members and supported by 165 regional and national organizations, funds “green” resident-led recovery projects to help meet the overwhelming unmet needs of the individuals, families and communities devastated by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

WBOK purchased by Danny Bakewell, champion of Black economic self-determination

June 4, 2009

WBOK has come back strong from the severe damage inflicted on its studio, offices, transmitter site and broadcast tower by the flooding in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Now broadcasting over a powerful signal, the station adopted a Black talk format – “Real Talk for Real Times” – on Nov. 1, 2007, after it was purchased and upgraded by Danny Bakewell Sr. on behalf of the Bakewell family.

Media as a weapon: New Orleans’ 2-Cent

June 4, 2009

“Malcolm X would love to make mixtapes, have those out on the streets. The same reasons they boycotted and had protests in that era are our reasons too. We’re coming from that same mindset, but we’re using new tools, trying to get our inheritance.”

Government goes on trial for Katrina flooding

May 19, 2009

Survivors of Hurricane Katrina are finally getting their day in court. In a trial lasting most of a month that went to the judge Thursday, May 14, in New Orleans, a group of residents is holding the Army Corps of Engineers responsible for the flooding that occurred in the wake of Katrina.

Damaged roots in the fight for public housing?

May 11, 2009

The fight for housing affordable to low-income families in the United States is a vortex – even unlike the work I did representing immigrants in the post-9/11 world. In my experience, fighting for public housing is more unpopular than fighting for non-citizens’ rights.

‘Dr. King died for me’: the dreams of Mychal Bell of the Jena 6

April 7, 2009

My name is Mychal Bell and I was one of the Jena 6 that was charged with attempted murder down in Jena, Louisiana, in 2006.

Ruling in the case of New Orleans City Council v. Tracie Washington

March 12, 2009

This case against Tracie Washington, champion of the rights of the poor to return to New Orleans, sets a frightening precedent: Make a successful public records request that an official doesn’t like and you too could be summoned to court.

Stop the evictions! Stop the demolition of public housing!

March 4, 2009

Rally and march Saturday, March 7, 1 p.m., Orleans and Claiborne Avenues in New Orleans to stop the demolition of Lafitte and the Mid-City area where the replacement for Charity Hospital is planned.

Dr. King shows us the way to end poverty in America

January 21, 2009

The Gulf Coast Civic Works Act to fund “green” resident-led recovery projects is inspired by Dr. King’s proposal for ending poverty: a public works New Deal-like program assuring full employment.

New Year’s resolution: Stop shooting young Black men

January 9, 2009

Oscar Grant III and Adolph Grimes III were both young and Black, and therefore both were gunned down by police in the early hours of New Year’s Day, one in Oakland, one in New Orleans.

New Orleans mobilizes against police murder of Adolph Grimes

January 8, 2009

About two dozen citizens gathered outside of the 2nd District police headquarters at 7:30 this morning to condemn the slaying of Adolph Grimes III by a gang of New Orleans police officers.

New Orleanians gear up for long overdue rebuilding

January 7, 2009

Neighborhood planning and oversight on needed infrastructure and services will keep the focus on regional needs and local job creation and work related income for workers, with job-oriented training and backup services like child care and transitional housing.

Condemn the New Orleans police murder of Adolph Grimes III

January 7, 2009

The New Orleans police have murdered another African American youth. Around 3 a.m. New Year’s Day, an elite squad of un-named plainclothes officers shot and killed 22-year-old Adolph Grimes III.

Five bailout lessons from Katrina

December 26, 2008

Year end bonuses continue while foreclosures increase? The needs of the poor must take priority over the wants of the rich.

How will you celebrate Christmas?

December 24, 2008

In this year of financial and economic collapse, and pretty near unprecedented global, geopolitical and military stress, the greatest irony is that we are now living in conditions similar to the deprivations of the Infant of Bethlehem.

‘If it moved, you shot it’: Investigation uncovers vigilante shootings of Blacks in New Orleans

December 18, 2008

In an 18-month investigation, A.C. Thompson weaves together stories of both innocent victims and unrepentant vigilantes, painting a terrifying and never before told picture of a hidden race war in New Orleans in the days following Hurricane Katrina.

Three years and 69 days: Obama’s victory as seen from New Orleans

November 29, 2008

Three years and 69 days was a lifetime ago in political terms. There are still many Americans living today who grew up in an apartheid America where the concept of even allowing Blacks to vote in many states and counties was considered impossible.

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