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Posts Tagged with "Civil Rights Movement"

Julian Bond on Ebony cover 0569

Julian Bond, race man

August 22, 2015

Of all the labels and titles that could rightfully be appended to Bond – activist, politician, lecturer, commentator, professor – he wished to be remembered most as a “race man”: “A race man is an expression that’s not used anymore, but it used to describe a man – usually a man, could have been a woman too – who was a good defender of the race, who didn’t dislike White people, but who stood up for Black people, who fought for Black people. I’d want people to say that about me.”

Police, bolstered by the California National Guard, showed the Watts rebels no mercy, but the people were determined to be heard. It took 14,000 National Guard troops, 3,000 arrests, 800 injuries and 32 deaths to put down the Watts Rebellion. Police watching nonchalantly as a young Black man bleeds to death is reminiscent of Mike Brown in Ferguson in 2014 and Kenneth Harding in Hunters Point in 2011.

50th anniversary of the Watts Rebellion, a turning point in the struggle for Black liberation

August 11, 2015

Just five days after the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Watts Rebellion erupted, lasting several days. Today urban rebellion remains a key element in the struggle of the African American people against national oppression and economic exploitation. Since 2012, with the vigilante killing of Trayvon Martin and the resultant acquittal of George Zimmerman, a rising consciousness and intolerance for racism has been rapidly accelerating.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Freeing our families from the criminal justice chokehold

July 25, 2015

Calling all families: Come out for ‘A Fair Chance to Advance’ on Saturday, Aug. 1, 11-2, at At Thy Word Church, 8915 International Blvd, Oakland, to see how Prop 47, reducing many felonies to misdemeanors, can free your family – presented by Bay Area Black Workers Center, Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice, East Bay Community Law Center, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights and Assemblyman Rob Bonta.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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Bree Newsom removes Confederate flag from SC capitol grounds 062715, cropped

Bree Newsome describes her role in persuading South Carolina to banish slavery flag

July 10, 2015

On June 27, a young freedom fighter and community organizer mounted an awe-inspiring campaign to bring down the Confederate battle flag. Brittany “Bree” Newsome, in a courageous act of civil disobedience, scaled a metal pole using a climbing harness, to remove the flag from the grounds of the South Carolina state capitol. She refused law enforcement commands to end her mission and was immediately arrested along with ally James Ian Tyson. Though the flag was replaced an hour later, only 12 days later, the Legislature voted it down for good.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Brother Tehuti – Photo: Kimara Dixon

Wanda’s Picks for July 2015

July 1, 2015

Libations to Ornette Coleman, musician, composer, March 9, 1930-June 11, 2015. Libations also for Brother Tahuti, a beloved elder who made his transition mid-June. Those of us who commemorate our African Ancestors of the Middle Passage have formed an organization which took me recently to Washington, D.C. At the website guests can learn about commemorations throughout the United States and beyond.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Nina Simone, daughter Lisa-2, cropped

Lisa Simone Kelly tells the real story of her mother, Nina Simone

June 26, 2015

Block Report Radio interviews Lisa Simone Kelly, the only child of the late great protest musician Nina Simone. We talk in depth about the new amazing Netflix documentary, “What Happened, Miss Simone?” We also talk about Simone’s contribution to Civil Rights Movement, the upcoming film, “Nina,” as well as Lisa moving to and touring in France. To hear more from the Block Report, tune in to BlockReportRadio.com.

Nina Simone

New Nina Simone documentary: ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’

June 11, 2015

“What Happened, Miss Simone?” is a beautiful and tragic look at the life of one of the women who made us proud to be Black. She helped us to transform our minds from the psychology of scared Colored Negroes into being proud Black Africans in America. The film documents some of her thoughts and includes a lot of archival interview footage and footage of her performing.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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In Baltimore on Monday, April 27, 10,000 hit the streets to demand justice for Freddie Gray.

Stand with the defiant ones in Baltimore

April 28, 2015

The uprising in Baltimore has delivered an unmistakable and powerful message that the time is over when people will tolerate the unending and outrageous murder and brutality carried out by police. The torture and murder of Freddie Gray for nothing – and the ongoing, infuriating lies and coverup – is only the latest in a long line of such horrors in not only Baltimore but all over the U.S., from North Charleston, S.C., to Ferguson, Missouri, from Pasco, Washington, to New York City and beyond – THIS MUST STOP!

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Legendary percussionist Pete Escovedo and Maestro Curtis check the playlist. – Photo: Rochelle Metcalfe

Third Street Stroll …

April 1, 2015

The annual BLACK CUISINE, benefit Bayview Hunters Point Multipurpose Senior Services, Inc., was very successful. Legendary percussionist and band leader PETE ESCOVEDO was the headliner joined by JUAN ESCOVEDO and MAESTRO CURTIS and band – ACTION WAS HOT! Pete was to see limited participation BUT FELT SOOO GOOD he performed the entire set, much to the joy of entertainment coordinator SUZY TYNER.

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Almost at the end of their 2,400-mile van ride across the country, All of Us or None members stopped in Byhalia, Miss., to see a comrade, Shabaka Ji Jaga, and have a little reunion and breakfast.

Formerly incarcerated people drive 2,400 miles to celebrate 50 years since Bloody Sunday in Selma

March 9, 2015

Bay Area All of Us or None (AOUON) members drove across the country this past weekend to Selma, Alabama, to attend the 50th anniversary commemoration of Bloody Sunday, which included a speech by President Obama and a reenactment of the historical march. They went to speak out about voting rights for formerly incarcerated people as well as the need for an executive order to Ban the Box for federal contractors.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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A Zimbabwean in Harare reads the state-owned Herald on President Mugabe’s 91st birthday, Feb. 21, 2015, also the anniversary of the assassination of another pan-Africanist, El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz  - Malcolm X – who was gunned down at 39. He would have been 89 today. – Photo: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, AP

At 91, President Mugabe leads Zimbabwe, SADC and African Union – with vigor

February 24, 2015

As Zimbabweans and their loving neighbors in the Southern African Development Community region celebrate President Mugabe’s 91st birthday Feb. 21, it is in fact, every African’s cause for celebration. President Mugabe’s pan-Africanist and internationalist vision makes him connect with Africans at home and abroad. It is now time to turn our attention to this impressive club of Africans who lived into their 90s that President Mugabe belongs to.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Dred Scott is buried about a mile down the same road from where Mike Brown was murdered.

The value of Black life in America, Part 1

February 17, 2015

The same mindset that allows a police officer to summarily execute an innocent, unarmed Black person in the street is the same mindset that allows an officer to plant evidence and lie on the witness stand. It allows a judge to appoint a knowingly incompetent defense attorney, and it allows a prosecutor to withhold evidence, use false evidence, to overcharge and to discriminate with impunity.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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P.H. Polk

P.H. Polk, one of ‘10 essential African-American photographers’

February 10, 2015

Prentice Hall Polk (1898-1985) is one of the world’s quintessential photographers because he captured the honesty, pride and nobility of Afrikan people, during a time in history when portraitures of Afrikan people were typically nothing but caricatures indicative of the Jim Crow laws and of white supremacy. Mr. Polk enjoyed his work creating, preserving and documenting an important part of Afrikan history.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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The Deecolonize and POOR family marched with thousands through the streets of San Francisco on Martin Luther King Day. That’s 9-year-old Queena in front dressed in pink. – Photo: Poor News Network

From Selma to San Francisco, BlackLivesMatter from 1963 to 2015

February 2, 2015

Students of the Revolutionary Youth Media Education class at Deecolonize Academy haven been learning, writing and living police terror and resistance as children of Black, Brown and poor parents. On Jan. 19, all of the youth skolaz at Deecolonize Academy and adult poverty skolaz at POOR Magazine began the day marching for MLK, for Black lives and for all of us, followed up by a trip to see the movie “Selma” and ended with a die-in outside the movie theatre in SF.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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After more than 400 years of Black history in this country, Black children must still remind the public of their humanity.

Pattern of practice: Centuries of racist oppression culminating in mass incarceration

January 26, 2015

After winning their freedom in the bloodiest conflict in U.S. history, Blacks were in many cases and places denied basic human, civil and political rights, literally forcing New Afrikans back into slavery by denying them a right to life. Over the years the government declared and waged war on the New Afrikan communities – war on unemployed “vagrants,’ war on crime, war on drugs, war on gangs – culminating in mass incarceration.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Kujichagulia

African American classical music: Renaissance woman P. Kujichagulia speaks

January 20, 2015

On Sunday, Feb. 1, 1-3 p.m., to kick off Black History Month, she will be giving a lecture called “Racism and All That Jazz” on African American classical music, aka Jazz, in the Koret Auditorium at the San Francisco Main Library, 100 Larkin St. “I’m honored to have the fabulous Yemanya Napue, percussionists Val Serrant and Sosu Ayansolo and visual artist Duane Deterville collaborate with me on this presentation,” she says.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Dr. King, 39, speaks at Mason Temple in Memphis on April 3, 1968, the day before his assassination.

Rep. Barbara Lee: We’re still living in ‘two Americas’

January 19, 2015

In 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Stanford University to deliver the first iteration of his speech, “The Other America.” Dr. King called attention to the disparate “two Americas” in which whites and Blacks lived – one filled with potential and prosperity and the other filled with “blasted hopes and shattered dreams.” When Dr. King gave this speech in 1967, the Civil Rights Movement was at a turning point.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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In Harlem, 15,000 march in solidarity with the Selma voting rights struggle. – Photo: Stanley Wolfson, World Telegram & Sun, Library of Congress

Ten things you should know about Selma before you see the film

January 13, 2015

This brief introduction to Selma’s bottom up history can help students and others learn valuable lessons for today. As SNCC veteran and filmmaker Judy Richardson said: “If we don’t learn that it was people just like us – our mothers, our uncles, our classmates, our clergy – who made and sustained the modern Civil Rights Movement, then we won’t know we can do it again. And then the other side wins – even before we ever begin the fight.”

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Screenwriter Paul Webb, director Ava DuVernay and actor David Oyelowo portray a humanized Dr. Martin Luther King. – Photo: Atsushi Nishijima, Paramount Pictures

‘Selma’: Unexpected bounty

January 12, 2015

I’ve finally seen “Selma” and can report it is a proper civil rights movie. By that I mean it takes few chances either thematically or aesthetically. The icons remain intact and the movement free from revisionist recriminations. This cautious strategy is understandable in a risk-averse Hollywood. Although boxed in by those kinds of commercial expectations, “Selma” delivers even more than it should.

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Supervisor Keith Carson: A hopeful 2015

December 29, 2014

I approach 2015 with mixed emotions but remain hopeful. Our economy is improving from the collapse of 2008. Our stock market has rebounded, employment rates are on the rise – yet, the issue of racial inequity in this country is magnified more than ever. The ongoing protests of the deaths of unarmed Black men by law enforcement has drawn attention to the issues of inequality in the treatment of people of color by law enforcement.

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