Support SF BayView
Donate or Subscribe to SF Bay View
Follow Us Twitter Facebook

Posts Tagged with "communities of color"

Uncle Carey gives nephew Marcelo, age 2, some pointers on life.

Early childhood education: Look both ways and watch out for the police

July 3, 2014

The joy of fatherhood can quickly be interrupted by unexpected twists and turns in daily life. We do our best to prepare our children for these occasions – let’s call them “bumps in the road” – that we know they will inevitably face. Over the past 30 years or so, the ever increasing presence of law enforcement in the lives of our children has created new challenges for them as well as for us as parents.

Women protest the “sterilization of mothers” in about 1971 when the women’s movement was emboldening women across the country. But while relatively well-off white women were demanding abortion rights, Black women and poor women generally were left alone to fend against sterilization, whether coerced or performed without their knowledge. – Photo: Southern Conference Educational Fund

Who gets to choose? Coerced sterilization in California prisons

June 23, 2014

In California, policy-driven sterilization programs have reared their ugly head once again. Women prisoners in the care of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) have been confronted with coerced sterilization, according to a report released last July by the Center for Investigative Reporting. Nearly 150 women prisoners were sterilized between 2005 and 2013 without the necessary state approvals.

No Comments
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:
Eric Holder

They’ve done their time, now let them vote

February 26, 2014

On Feb. 11, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. urged states to repeal laws that prohibit people who were formerly incarcerated from voting, a move that would restore the right to vote to millions. This timely announcement does not just address officials in states such as Florida or Mississippi, but has implications here at home. California is currently facing its own disenfranchisement crisis.

Toxic threats to people of color: Environmental justice leaders meet in Denver Feb. 11-12

February 11, 2014

Juan Parras explains: “Today is the 20th anniversary of Executive Order 12898 to address Environmental Justice in ‘Minority’ and Low Income Populations, issued by President Clinton. We came to Denver to celebrate our successes but, more importantly, we came because the work is far from done.” Mr. Parras and others are attending the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council (NEJAC) meeting in Denver this week.

Formerly Incarcerated People’s Policy Academy launches in Los Angeles

February 4, 2014

Typically we don’t show up to the fight until several of us have been shot. We don’t show up early on not because we don’t care, but because in general we don’t know how. That’s why Legal Services for Prisoners with Children (LSPC) is establishing a policy academy to increase civic participation by formerly incarcerated people, both locally and statewide. Our first training drew 50 people to the Watts Labor Center in Los Angeles.

No Comments
Filed Under: California and the U.S.
Tags:

Greening the hood: Is clean energy reaching poor communities?

November 27, 2013

For Adama Mosley, a resident of the West Oakland neighborhood known as Ghost Town, having solar panels installed on her home was “a dream come true.” Energy advocates say significant challenges lie ahead if affordable renewable energy and widespread adoption of energy efficiency are to become a reality in low-income communities of color.

1 Comment
Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Tags:

Andy Lopez, 13, murdered by cop with ‘mean gene’

November 10, 2013

The child’s destination was a friend’s house on a bright sunny day. The child had a toy. But Andy Lopez Cruz didn’t see his friend that day. Andy will not ever see any of his friends again. For within 10 seconds, the cops had rolled up behind him, reported him as suspicious, called for backup and shot him seven times. He was shot twice in the back before he hit the ground; he got a chance to scream “Stop” once and then he died.

7 Comments
Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Tags:

Using city power to prevent foreclosure

September 30, 2013

The City of Richmond is working with a group called Mortgage Resolution Partners. This company looks at underwater mortgages and offers the current lenders – banks, mortgage companies – to take the property off their hands at its current lower value and then lower the mortgage payments for the family living in the house.

Internet radio is on the rise: an interview wit’ Streets Is Talking founder Leon Dynastee

September 25, 2013

Streets Is Talking Radio is one of the dope internet radio shows that is based out of Oakland’s Youth Radio building. It was founded a few years back by Leon Dynastee to be a part of the Allday.fm lineup of radio shows that were being produced as part of a new network. It has been one of the more popular shows on the network considering that it has had to compete with the shows of such legends as Davey D and Sake 1.

Richmond homeowners beat Wall Street bullies 4-3

September 14, 2013

Tuesday night, Sept. 10, the Richmond, California, City Council held a meeting packed with hundreds of community members who rallied to defend the Richmond CARES principal reduction plan that has inspired hope nationwide and a Wall Street-led campaign of threats, litigation and a deceptive election-style effort to sway public opinion. The City Council voted 4-3 to form a Joint Powers Authority to enact local principal reduction.

4 Comments
Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Tags:

Oaksterdam professor gives the science on cannabis: an interview wit’ Paul Armentano

August 22, 2013

Paul Armentano is one of the many interesting professors at Oaksterdam University who is on the front lines of the re-legalization and de-criminalization of marijuana movement in the United States. He is a scientist and has been for about two decades an activist with the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, so he is definitely not new to this.

The Jackson Plan: Lessons from Jackson, Mississippi

July 30, 2013

Chokwe Lumumba, a veteran of the Black Liberation and New African Independence movements, was elected mayor of Jackson on June 2, 2013. Jackson is the capital of Mississippi and is a city that is over 85 percent Black. If the election of Obama to the presidency of the United States constituted the alleged end of the Black Liberation Movement, the election of Chokwe Lumumba must then represent its resurrection.

1 Comment
Filed Under: California and the U.S.
Tags:

Hunger strike rally at Corcoran Prison: The sound before the fury

July 16, 2013

It is hot enough in Corcoran, California, to melt people. That being said, it still wasn’t hot enough to keep upwards of 400 people from braving 103-degree weather to mobilize and rally at Corcoran State Prison in support of over 30,000 prisoners on hunger strike in California. The immediate goal is to stop the cruelty and torture that being held in isolation represents. The long-range objective is liberation.

6 Comments
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

California anti-tobacco advocates urge FDA to ban menthol in cigarettes as part of World No Tobacco Day

June 9, 2013

In observance of World No Tobacco Day, African American anti-tobacco advocates in California and across the country are calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban menthol in cigarettes and other tobacco products. Advocates also are urging concerned groups and individuals to sign on to a historic citizen’s petition filed with the FDA in support of this national effort.

National Black leaders decry economic exclusion from 49ers’ stadium construction

April 30, 2013

“We must leverage our athletic success for economic development in our community,” says Magic Johnson. Everett L. Glenn, president of the National Sports Authority, a division of ESP Education & Leadership Institute, is applying that principle to construction of the 49ers’ new stadium under construction in Santa Clara.

10 Comments
Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Tags:

Superintendent implicated in cover-up of Oakland School Police killing of Raheim Brown

April 27, 2013

Perhaps you’ve heard or read the name Raheim Brown Jr. He’s the 20-year-old Black man who was beaten then shot and killed by Oakland School Police Department Sgt. Bhatt. What real justification can there be for officers – who were hired to secure a school dance on a school campus – to venture from their assigned duty posts and beat, shoot and kill innocent youth?

Taking back City College from the corporations – by any means necessary

April 1, 2013

“Whose college? Our College!” The wave of thousands of people’s voices at City Hall rang in our collective ears. If we ever needed to put our bodies in the forefront of this fight, it is now. The fight to save City College comes to Bayview Hunters Point Wednesday, April 3, 6 p.m., Southeast Campus, 1800 Oakdale at Phelps, San Francisco – come learn and get involved.

Pasted_Image_3_26_13_3_38_PM

Generational incarceration

March 25, 2013

What a tragic image: A man and his son handcuffed and shackled together, yet musingly delighted about seeing a senior family member whom they are not going inside to visit. Rather, the two are to join in what is widely considered as America’s modern day form of slavery. The inhumanity represented in this artwork should be disturbing to anyone with a conscience – but few are moved.

No Bratton-style policing in Oakland: Unraveling the fraying edges of zero tolerance

January 22, 2013

Hundreds turned out for Oakland City Council’s Public Safety Committee meeting on Jan. 15, 2013, to oppose paying $250,000 to bring “supercop” William Bratton and his “stop and frisk” and other zero tolerance police policies to Oakland. The bid for Bratton’s consult seems to be simply Oakland throwing good money after bad.

3 Comments
Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Tags:

Report: Dr. King’s dream of economic equality deferred as racial wealth disparities persist

January 21, 2013

The 10th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day report by UFE explains that the Great Recession took a greater portion of wealth from Black and Latino families than it did from White families. Today, the average net worth of White families is, respectively, more than six times higher and 5.7 times higher than the average Black and Latino families. Median wealth disparities are even greater.

BayView Classifieds - ads, opportunities, announcements
San Francisco Comcast
Advertisement