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Posts Tagged with "Fidel Castro"

Salute to a great freedom fighter: The indomitable spirit of Fidel Castro will live forever

November 27, 2016

Fidel Castro can never die. He departed the physical plane, but he will live on forever. His intellectual prowess and wisdom were extraordinary among mortals. His legacy and influence is global and monumental. This humble man, from a small Caribbean country, can truly be said to have changed the world. One of his greatest contributions to humanity is the example of his unwavering revolutionary determination and courage in the face of enormous obstacles placed in his path. He became an inspiration to all who fight for true independence.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Fidel Castro: Africa has lost a friend

November 26, 2016

Fidel Castro will go down in history as a revolutionary leader who strongly supported the liberation struggle in Africa. The courage with which he withstood and confronted years of intimidation and threats from the gatekeepers of the “might is right” ideology, and on his own terms, inspired and will inspire the alternative world of genuine hope and freedom. Fidel is dead – but alive because the revolution he led is eternal in our spirit and that of posterity.

Talkin’ with author Devyn Benson about ‘Antiracism in Cuba: The Unfinished Revolution’

August 2, 2016

“Antiracism in Cuba: The Unfinished Revolution” by author and professor Devyn Benson is an impressive study on the history of racism and Black organizing in Cuba prior to the 1959 revolution and right after it. I talked with author Devyn Benson about racial nuances as we discussed Black Cuban history. Check her out in her own words in this exclusive interview.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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‘Codigo Color’ at SF Black Film Fest: Cuban doc explores colorism and cultural ignorance on the island

June 16, 2016

This year at the San Francisco Black Film Festival, “Codigo Color, Memorias” is one of the internationally made jewels that will be exposing the Bay Area to the issue of colorism in Cuba. “Codigo Color, Memorias” will screen on Saturday, June 18, at the African American Art and Culture Complex. I sat down with the filmmaker, William Sabourin, for an exclusive Q&A about his informative and perfectly timed film. Check him out in his own words.

Cuban National Assembly member Kenia Serrano speaks on diplomatic normalization with the US

December 16, 2015

Kenia Serrano is a member of the Cuban National Assembly, as well as the president of the Cuban Institute of Friendship with the People. We sat down with her to discuss the normalization of diplomatic relations, Cuban-developed medical technologies that the U.S. has been denying its residents because of the blockade, the release of the Cuban 5 and the security of our beloved Black Liberation Army political exile Assata Shakur.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Cuba to release 3,522 prisoners on the eve of Pope Francis’ visit; why can’t Obama do the same?

September 17, 2015

Just prior to the visit of Pope Francis to Cuba on Sept. 19, the Cuban government has announced the release of 3,522 people being held in the country’s jails. This humanitarian gesture will include prisoners who are over 60 years of age, younger than 20, those with chronic illnesses, women and those who are close to their release dates. Why couldn’t Obama follow the Cuban example before Pope Francis continues on his tour to the U.S. on Sept. 22?

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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The mind that sees: The third eye of Eslanda Goode Robeson

May 27, 2015

Her name was Eslanda Cardozo Goode Robeson, and she was brilliant! But what is perturbing is that evidence of her enormous body of work as a photographer has vanished, as though she did not exist! But exist she very much did indeed! Eslanda Robeson lived and made an impact in the world. She was a writer, storyteller, intellectual, adventurer, scientist, anthropologist, political analyst, artist, anti-colonialist activist and a woman of principle.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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The third edition of the ‘Monumental Battle Cry for Cuba and Zimbabwe’ has been released

May 21, 2015

Writer, reporter and Pan Africanist Obi Egbuna, the U.S. correspondent to the Zimbabwean national newspaper The Herald, recently finished, alongside co-executive producer M1 of dead prez, the third volume of the “Battle Cry for Cuba and Zimbabwe” compilation, which is a cultural protest against how the two countries have been unfairly sanctioned by the U.S. government. Check out Obi Egbuna in his own words.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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The T-shirt warrior: an interview with Chris Zamani, founder of the Hapo Zamani Za Kale T-shirt line

July 31, 2014

Chris Zamani, founder of the Hapo Zamani Za Kale clothing line, is a t-shirt designer who is on the pioneering front of trying to politicize the consciousness in the Black community through changing the kinds of people and messages on the t-shirts we are wearing. He started a line of t-shirts which immortalizes and commemorates revolutionary heroes and sheroes from the African continent, people like Nkrumah, Lumumba, Machel, Nehanda, Asantewaa, Mugabe and more.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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At SF Black Film Festival, new doc sheds light on race in Cuba

June 12, 2014

An enthusiastic crowd is anticipated at the San Francisco premiere of the documentary film “Black and Cuba” this Friday, June 13. Directed by Robin J. Hayes, PhD, a professor and human rights advocate, the documentary follows diverse Ivy League students as they band together and take a field trip to the enigmatic island of Cuba. The controversial Caribbean nation’s population is approximately 60 percent Black.

A woman called Maya

May 29, 2014

Maya Angelou had to be the name of a poet. It is too perfect, too lyrical to fit any other personality. She blazed an incandescent streak across the heavens as the voice of memory – as poet, actress, author and activist. She taught generations of students as an honored professor of literature. As a young woman, she struck the boards as an African dancer. And she was a close friend and colleague of Malcolm X.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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A Caribbean obsession: The United States’ endless campaign to destabilize Cuba

April 29, 2014

The recent revelations about the USAID’s farfetched scheme to foster a popular anti-government protest movement by infiltrating Cuba’s mobile phone network perhaps bring full circle America’s 55-year campaign to destroy the Cuban Revolution. Fortunately for the people of Cuba, none of these bewildering, hairbrained and often violent schemes – which have included countless attacks on Cuban soil – have succeeded.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Nelson Mandela, Cuba and the Terror List

December 30, 2013

In a statement at the White House, President Obama paid tribute to Nelson Mandela who died Dec. 5 at age 95. As the world focuses on the historic handshake between President Obama and Cuban President Raúl Castro, we look back at the pivotal role Cuba played in ending apartheid and why Castro was one of only five world leaders invited to speak at Nelson Mandela’s Dec. 10 memorial in Johannesburg.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Mandela, America, Israel and systems of oppression

December 14, 2013

In the 23 years since Nelson Mandela walked from his notorious Robben Island prison cell, leaving behind the rotting corpse of South Africa’s system of racial and economic oppression known as apartheid, a new generation has grown into adulthood there, literally unaware of the cruel exploitation and indignities the tiny White minority population inflicted on the masses of that country’s people.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Mandela’s legacy extends from South Africa, the continent to the world

December 11, 2013

Nelson Mandela’s passing has drawn responses from throughout the U.S. and the world. To oppressed and working people, Mandela was a symbol and example of self-sacrifice and lifelong commitment to revolutionary change. Although the struggle inside South Africa and throughout the region is by no means complete, the legacy of Mandela through the ANC, SACP, COSATU and other affiliated organizations will live on.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Hunger striker: We’ve all come a long way to settle for less

November 11, 2013

CDCR tried their hardest to deceive the public by defaming our peaceful movement. They labeled us and attacked our character as a collective. Our peaceful protests have nothing to do with furthering “gangs” or “prison politics,” which CDCR loosely reported. They have ALL to do with amplifying our voices to let the world know that the bodies this nation holds captive in its isolation chambers are human beings too.

Killer cop vengeance: Was the OPD killing of Alan Blueford a retaliatory hit?

May 28, 2013

The Blueford family and the Justice 4 Alan Blueford coalition (JAB) held a vigil for Alan on the one-year anniversary of his murder by Oakland police officer Miguel Masso. JAB has based itself deep within the Afrikan community that birthed it and has brought together many organizations and individuals to fight for justice for Alan and to stop continued police violence.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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Robert Chrisman and The Black Scholar

March 21, 2013

Robert Chrisman and the internationally acclaimed The Black Scholar journal (TBS) are principle beacons of achievement and hope within the movement to create Black Studies departments and ultimately Ethnic Studies and Women’s Studies departments. Chrisman and The Black Scholar occupied the vanguard of the struggle for recognition of Black Studies as a serious academic endeavor.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Belva Davis: ‘Never in my wildest dreams’ – What a night to remember

March 7, 2013

The Bay Area and beyond paid tribute to Belva Davis Feb. 23 at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, pouring out memories of her struggles as a “first” on many fronts, breaking through racist barriers and bringing Black people, perspectives and issues to the mainstream news. The unforgettable night also marked the 50th wedding anniversary for Belva and Bill Moore, first Black news cameraman in commercial television on the West Coast.

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First images released of Venezuelan President Chavez since his operation

February 16, 2013

The Venezuelan government has released the first photographs of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez since his cancer operation last Dec. 11. The images show a smiling Chavez lying down in his hospital bed, flanked by his two daughters. The images were taken for Valentine’s Day, or “the day of love and friendship” as it is commonly referred to in Venezuela.

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