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Posts Tagged with "Haiti and Latin America"

As host of Freedom Now, Dedon Kamathi used the KPFK airwaves to build Pan-Africanism.

A-APRP comrade speaks on the work of the late Dedon Kamathi

September 25, 2015

When the African world revolution lost Dedon Kamathi, we lost an organizer’s organizer, a void that will definitely be very hard to fill. I talked to one of Dedon’s close comrades in the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, Munyiga Lumumba, so that he could give the people who didn’t know Dedon like we did a glimpse into the politics and the spirit that made Dedon Dedon.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories

Ezili Danto speaks on Haitian political history

July 21, 2015

Lawyer, artist and activist Ezili Danto gives the Block Report audience a history lesson on the first republic to free itself militarily from slavery, under the direction of the first Pan African head of state, Dessalines. We are talking about none other than Haiti. She also gives us a little bit of the history of the Dominican Republic and its relationship with Haiti as well as the role that the mulatoes have played in Haitian history.

Lynchings Florida 1934, Dominican Republic 2015

Haitian man lynched in Dominican Republic park

February 19, 2015

On Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2015, in the Dominican Republic, supposedly a paradise of European development, a Haitian man named Henry Claude Jean, known as “Tulile,” a humble shoe shine worker, was found hanging in a park in Santiago, his hands and feet bound. In Haiti, the U.S.-installed Martelly dictatorship and its controlled opposition remain silent about this atrocious lynching.

Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
On a celebratory election night at Richmond Progressive Alliance headquarters, re-elected Richmond City Councilors Gayle McLaughlin and Jovanka Beckles listen as City Councilor Eduardo Martinez speaks. Chevron spent $1 million each to defeat them – and failed. In an October speech to a packed Richmond Auditorium, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, Independent of Vermont, had said, “If you can stand up and beat (Chevron) with all of their money, you’re going to give hope to people all over America.” – Photo: Tom Goulding, Richmond Confidential

Does Richmond, California, have a progressive majority?

February 15, 2015

The Richmond Progressive Alliance, commonly known as the RPA, is backing Planning Commissioner Marilyn Langlois for the vacant seat on the Richmond City Council. The RPA made national and international headlines last November, when each of their three City Council candidates won their seats even though Chevron Corp, spent $1 million each to defeat them. KPFA’s Ann Garrison spoke to Richmond City Councilor Eduardo Martinez.

On a past tour, Dr. Brown and her students hiked in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica.

Meet Dr. Brown, head of the African American Studies Department at Merritt College

February 1, 2015

Dr. Siri Brown is a professor at Merritt College in Oakland and head of its African American Studies Department. She is an academic who understands her role in the classroom, giving young people a knowledge of self and opening fertile minds to the social realities that are oppressing their people as well. She has been an example for present day and future academics for over a decade on how to teach history in a living way.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
On Friday, Jan. 16, to kick off the #ReclaimMLK weekend, protesters with Third World Resistance chained themselves to the Oakland Federal Building entrances, shutting it down for four hours and 28 minutes. – Photo: Critical Resistance

Third World Resistance: Reclaiming the radical Dr. King to protest police and prisons

February 1, 2015

Dr. King devoted his life to struggle. The end of his career was characterized by a devout rejection of militarism, economic inequality, racism and imperialism. Yet state sponsored commemorations on MLK Day have consistently left out this narrative. In our first post-Ferguson MLK weekend, people around the country mobilized to honor Dr. King’s legacy the way he would have wanted it – through massive demonstrations, direct actions and shutdowns.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff reviews U.N. troops in Haiti. – Photo: Blog do Planalto

Et tu, Brute? Haiti’s betrayal by Latin America

November 18, 2014

Without Haiti’s help, there would not have been any independent country in Latin America. On January 1, 1816, when Simon Bolivar arrived in Haiti, downtrodden and desperate for help to fight the Spanish, the only two republics in the Western Hemisphere were the United States, where slave ownership was in force, and Haiti, which had fought for and earned its independence in what is still the only successful slave rebellion ever in the world.

Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America

On Saturday we march with our Congolese comrades against the politics of death

November 8, 2014

We do not count to this society and this world. We can be driven from our homes, beaten, tortured and murdered with impunity. It is our responsibility to build a new politics, a politics that respects the dignity of all people, a politics that restores the land and wealth of the world to the people, a politics in which there are no people who can be freely driven from their homes and freely killed, a politics in which everyone counts.

Filed Under: Africa and the World

Wanda’s Picks for July 2014

July 9, 2014

The Glide Memorial Church family worked wonders at the celebration of San Francisco native Maya Angelou’s life that she requested before she died. They juxtaposed carefully chosen visual moments with prerecorded Maya moments, which made her presence so palatable that the sanctuary lights came under the control of Spirit Maya and played with our collective vision – the room almost dark and the lights flickering off and on.

Filed Under: Culture Stories
‘Once on This Island’-1 by Mark Kitaoka

TheatreWorks’ ‘Once on This Island’ – redemption song for Haiti

March 28, 2014

TheatreWorks’ production of “Once on This Island” is a beautifully choreographed story about love and loss, faith and selflessness. A musical based on the Caribbean writer and Black arts movement pioneer Rosa Guy’s adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s “Little Mermaid” set in a mysterious tropical island, when Napoleon appears defeated, we know it is Ayiti (Haiti).

Filed Under: Culture Stories
Ile a Vache protest by Dady Chery

Haiti is not for sale

March 14, 2014

The Washington colonists are back in Haiti, re-enslaving. Bloodhounds have been set loose by the Washington puppet Haiti government on free Haitians at Île à Vache (Ile a Vache/Ilavach), who are fighting back. It’s 2014, not 1704, but a bloody manhunt with hound dogs and weapons of war is let loose on the unarmed Île à Vache Haitians. These Haitians are descendants of enslaved Africans and freed U.S. Blacks.

Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America

Haiti: UN peacekeepers still not screened for cholera despite causing outbreak

January 16, 2014

It has been four years since an earthquake devastated the small country of Haiti. More than three years have elapsed since a U.N. peacekeeping unit from Nepal introduced cholera to Haiti. Despite telling CNN otherwise, the U.N. is not taking steps to ensure its peacekeepers do not carry cholera from country to country.

Immigration policy is good policy? If so, for whom?

December 2, 2013

On Monday, Nov. 25, President Barack Obama visited the Betty Ann Ong Chinese Recreation Center in San Francisco to talk about his Common Sense Immigration Bill slowly making its way through the United States Congress. Immigration is always topical in a country where most of us are immigrants even in the visible absence of its First Peoples.

Filed Under: California and the U.S.

Cholera spreads beyond Haiti as Mexico suffers devastating floods

November 17, 2013

The strain of cholera brought to Haiti by Nepalese U.N. soldiers in 2010 has spread to the Dominican Republic, Cuba and now Mexico. In the past few months, Mexico has reported 176 confirmed cases of the disease, with one death. The Pan American Health Organization reported that the genetic profile of the strain in Mexico presents a greater than 95 percent match with the Haitian strain.

Memories of Damu

August 21, 2013

Damu’s idea of revolutionary change meant, first, seeing the need for a radical transformation of the world and then having confidence that ordinary people, working people, are capable of making it happen. When they do rise up and try to fashion a new world, with all the mistakes humans are capable of making, he believed you have to support them.

Call for international solidarity as Colombia prisoners’ hunger strike enters 4th week, one dies

July 31, 2013

On July 25, a prisoner on hunger strike at the Doña Juana Penitentiary in Colombia died after having been refused medical treatment by his guards. He had been experiencing chest pains and asking to see a doctor, but his request was ignored. Soon the prisoner was dead from a heart attack. The next morning, 18 of the hunger strikers sewed their mouths shut in protest, and the hunger strike has risen to 176 participants.

Hunger strike rally at Corcoran Prison: The sound before the fury

July 16, 2013

It is hot enough in Corcoran, California, to melt people. That being said, it still wasn’t hot enough to keep upwards of 400 people from braving 103-degree weather to mobilize and rally at Corcoran State Prison in support of over 30,000 prisoners on hunger strike in California. The immediate goal is to stop the cruelty and torture that being held in isolation represents. The long-range objective is liberation.

Filed Under: Prison Stories

Mexico City hunger strikers demanding justice for Malcolm Shabazz attacked by hundreds of cops

July 12, 2013

Urgent alert! Police have attacked, beaten numerous protesters who are holding a peaceful vigil to call attention to the brutal death of Malcolm X’ grandson. Among those known to be physically and badly assaulted are Metelus Wilner and Jah Zakah from Haiti. We ask you to forward this and are looking for assistance in this matter urgently.

TBWIG - 1st Art Photos

‘The Black Woman Is God’ – Part II

May 29, 2013

Afrikan history is world history. World history is human history. And the Black Woman Is God. “The Black Woman Is God” exhibit is a continuation of great Afrikan thought, not solely an outstanding new work of collective and individual art. The closing reception is Thursday, May 30, 6 p.m., in the Sargent Johnson Gallery, African-American Arts and Culture Complex, 762 Fulton St., San Francisco

Filed Under: Culture Stories

‘Super-cop’ William Bratton and top brass shake-up at OPD

May 12, 2013

Oakland had three acting police chiefs in five days last week, and on Thursday, the police department’s controversial consultant, William Bratton, released his six-page report which criticized OPD’s top brass. Oakland Mayor Jean Quan then announced that Oakland would spend $30,000 on a headhunter’s nationwide search for a permanent chief.

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