Support SF BayView
Donate or Subscribe to SF Bay View
Follow Us Twitter Facebook

Posts Tagged with "John Brown"

SF NAACP Gala Tavis Smiley keynoter 110913 by Lance Burton, Planet Fillmore Communications, web, cropped

Tavis Smiley spotlights Black suffering, Black hope

December 6, 2013

The house was packed for the San Francisco NAACP Freedom Fund Gala, “We Shall Not Be Moved Until Justice Rolls Down Like a Mighty Stream,” at the Union Square Hilton on Saturday, Nov. 9, when Tavis Smiley, named one of “The World’s 100 Most Influential People” by TIME magazine, broadcaster, author of 16 books, publisher, advocate and philanthropist, took the mic. Beginning with excerpts from his introduction by San Francisco NAACP President Dr. Amos C. Brown, here is Tavis’ provocative and profoundly moving address:

1 Comment
Filed Under: SF Bay Area
Tags:

July 8, 2013: United KAGE Brothers’ demands

June 4, 2013

We, the United KAGE (Kings Against Genocidal Environments) Brothers, welcome you to our communion. We aim to unite and unionize the movement from within the belly of the beast to without. We wish to unite all people, regardless of color, race, creed, gender or sexuality. We all have much in common when dealing with prejudices and classism.

No Comments
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

Wanda’s Picks for April 2013

April 7, 2013

Wanda’s reviews for April include: the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument, the “Transformative Visions” exhibition at Studio One, Spirit Silence Retreat, “The Dream Never Dies,” “The Resurrection of SHE,” “Journey of the Shadow,” the 9th Annual CubaCaribe Festival of Dance Music, “The Whipping Man,” “Mental” and many more …

1 Comment
Filed Under: Culture Stories
Tags:

The Abolitionists or absolute bull: The myth of the Great White Hope

January 8, 2013

This week, PBS will air “The Abolitionists,” a movie about people who during the 19th century spoke out against the evils of chattel slavery. The Abolitionist Movement has been subject to historical revisionism and an attempt by white America to pick our heroes. African Americans must become experts in the field of their own history, as no other racial group would dare trust the interpretation of their culture to others.

6 Comments
Filed Under: Culture Stories
Tags:

Joanna Haigood’s ‘Sailing Away’: Black exodus from San Francisco 1858 and 2012

September 21, 2012

Sometimes one gets tired of living in a place that doesn’t want you there, Zaccho Artistic Director, Joanna Haigood, states at the reception Thursday at the California Historical Society. The only problem is 154 years later, Black people are still unwelcome in San Francisco, which is what “Sailing Away” addresses so eloquently without words.

3 Comments
Filed Under: Culture Stories
Tags:

A day in the life of an imprisoned revolutionary

May 8, 2012

“The purpose of the … control unit is to control revolutionary attitudes in the prison system and in the society at large,” said former Marion Supermax Prison Warden Ralph Aron. What is shocking to many is how can some not only resist such systematic psychological torture, but actually improve themselves under such conditions of extreme duress.

7 Comments
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

Wanda’s Picks for April 2012

April 4, 2012

The Oakland International Film Festival is Friday-Sunday, April 6-8, at the Oakland Museum of California, 10th and Oak Street, Oakland. Visit http://www.oiff.org/2012schedule.pdf. This year’s headliner is one of the most controversial independent films ever made, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door.” Watch it again here.

1 Comment
Filed Under: Culture Currents
Tags:

Tea parties and Occupy protests

November 9, 2011

The Boston Tea Party was a great event not only of rebellion, but law-breaking. Imagine the worth of crates of imported tea, broken into and tossed into the Boston harbor. Were they un-American? They destroyed private property. They reacted to the rich getting richer by looting their warehouses.

The People’s Lawyer: an interview wit’ Lynne Stewart

August 16, 2011

Lynne Stewart is one of the legendary activist lawyers of our time and also one of the many political prisoners of our time, who was incarcerated because her style of lawyering was called aiding and abetting a terrorist organization, by one of the biggest terrorist organizations ever known to humanity: the United States government.

2 Comments
Filed Under: Prison Stories
Tags:

The people’s lawyer, political prisoner Lynne Stewart: an interview wit’ her daughter, Brenna Stewart

July 8, 2010

Lynne Stewart has been a real people’s lawyer for over four decades, representing some of the most politically polarizing cases in this nation’s history. Within the next few days, she is set to be re-sentenced. We want all of our readers to know and assist in any way that they can People’s Lawyer Lynne Stewart, who is a modern-day legal John Brown.

‘John Brown’s Truth: A Musically Improvised Opera’ by William Crossman

March 14, 2010

Harper’s Ferry … freeing slaves … Virginia … hanging … white man – this is the extent of my knowledge of John Brown. I wasn’t aware that it was 150 years ago, on Oct. 14-15, 1859, that this happened, an event which many say forecast the Civil War and the emancipation of enslaved Africans. See the opera Sunday afternoon, March 14, 3 p.m., at the East Side Cultural Center.

Paul Robeson, a great human being

October 8, 2009

Paul Robeson was an extraordinary and versatile individual, world famous during his lifetime, who has been deliberately erased from the dominant myth of U.S. history for speaking the truth about conditions both domestic and abroad – his opposition to racism, fascism and colonialism and his support for civil and human rights, democracy, national liberation, socialism and the day-to-day resistance of working people of all lands to oppression, knowing that his fame would allow these messages to be more widely heard.

1 Comment
Filed Under: Culture Currents
Tags:

Black August

July 28, 2009

“George Jackson was my hero. He set a standard for prisoners, political prisoners, for people. He showed the love, the strength, the revolutionary fervor that’s characteristic of any soldier for the people. He inspired prisoners, whom I later encountered, to put his ideas into practice. And so his spirit became a living thing.” – from the eulogy by Huey P. Newton, former Minister of Defense, Black Panther Party, at the Revolutionary Memorial Service for George Jackson, 1971

BayView Classifieds - ads, opportunities, announcements
San Francisco Comcast