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Posts Tagged with "Michelle Alexander"

Systematic injustice against Sundiata Acoli

May 15, 2011

“Freeing all political prisoners, prisoners of conscience and prisoners of war” tops America’s social justice struggle, “because the state uses the criminal justice system to lock up those who sacrifice their livelihood for freedom and justices for the masses.”

‘I Mix What I Like’: an interview wit’ author Jared Ball, Ph.D.

May 14, 2011

Emancipatory journalism aggressively argues that we need radical community-based journalism that, while professional, organized and researched, is clear about its bias in favor of oppressed communities and their political organizations and struggle.

Wanda’s Picks for May 2011

May 4, 2011

Happy Mother’s Day to Yuri Kochiyama! I’d like to also wish the women who haven’t seen their children in a long time, some since birth, a special Happy Mother’s Day. Our prayers are with you even if you feel alone at a time when in America prisons systematically separate mothers from their children, often permanently.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Fulfilling King’s dream

April 4, 2011

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, while supporting Black sanitation workers fighting for collective bargaining rights. His support was part of his “Poor People’s Campaign,” a second phase of the civil rights movement.

Locked down, exploited and mistreated

January 10, 2011

Inmate beatings by prison guards occur across Georgia following an eight-day peaceful protest to highlight inhumane conditions in the prisons. These protesting prisoners must be silenced because a whole range of corporate interests has found that they can profit from caging human beings.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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The Scott sisters’ ‘debt to society’ and the new Jim Crow

January 10, 2011

Jamie and Gladys Scott walked out of prison Friday into the free world. Yet the sisters’ “debt to society” is still far from paid. The conditions of their release stipulate that Gladys Scott must give Jamie Scott a kidney, and the sisters will have to pay out money to maintain their freedom.

Obama’s drug war

December 30, 2010

Among the very few people celebrating our country’s fiscal crisis are criminal justice reformers. Bill Piper of Drug Policy Alliance says, “Next year is probably an unprecedented opportunity to defund the federal drug war.” But colorblind cost-benefit approaches leave intact the racial attitudes, stereotypes and anxieties that gave rise to the system in the first place.

Statement of solidarity with Georgia prisoner strike

December 20, 2010

On Dec. 9, 2010, thousands of prisoners in at least six Georgia state prisons initiated the largest prisoner strike in U.S. history, uniting across racial boundaries to demand an immediate end to the cruel and dehumanizing conditions that damage prisoners, their families and the communities they return to. Readers are invited to add their names to this solidarity statement.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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‘The New Jim Crow’

November 2, 2010

Michelle Alexander’s most salient point in her book “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” is her finding that America’s Black population constitutes a “racial caste” that feeds and perpetuates mass incarceration.

Freedom fighters support Gray-Haired Witnesses Fast for Justice! Funds to bring Scott Sisters’ family urgently needed!

June 19, 2010

All out to Washington, D.C., Monday, June 21, for the the Gray-Haired Witnesses Fast for Justice: 10 a.m. Department of Justice, 12 noon White House press conference, 1-9 p.m. Lafayette Square Park! We need your support in bringing national attention to the case of the Scott Sisters and all other women who have been incarcerated wrongly and egregiously over-sentenced, punishing and destroying our families and children.

Michelle Alexander’s ‘The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness’

May 6, 2010

Michelle Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” (published by The New Press, 2010) looks at the invisible people and the invisible birdcage that keeps the masses of Black people locked in and alienated from society – the targets of the War on Drugs.

The new Jim Crow: How the war on drugs gave birth to a permanent American undercaste

March 25, 2010

Among many startling findings by legal scholar Michelle Alexander, former director of the ACLU’s Racial Justice Project here in the Bay Area, is this: There are more African Americans under correctional control today – in prison or jail, on probation or parole – than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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