Tag: Mound Bayou Mississippi

Poverty people as benefactors sending out a clarion call Blackonizing the...

I’m sending out the most important press release that it has been my prayerful blessing to accomplish as a clarion call to Black Family Amerika to take a stand. To Black Mega­Church Amerika to take a stand. No more playing the do-nothingism game while expecting great change to occur. The Black family’s path forward is known as “ethno-aggregation,” found in two textbooks by Dr. Claud Anderson, “PowerNomics: The National Plan to Empower Black America” and “A Black History Reader: 101 Questions You Never Thought to Ask.”

Unity Sunday: Replace poverty with a plateau of plenty

The NAAFRA Unity Sunday Operational Plan, with the blessing of our Heavenly Father, is moving forward collectively to activate our NAAFRA Million Dollar Perpetual Unity Fund, the monetary strength needed to officially announce that the Black church and Black Family America is the vanguard in our family movement to remove all impoverished conditions from the life circumstances of far too many of our families.

NAAFRA: We need a youth hip-hop vanguard for change

NAAFRA, our family movement, calls for a youth vanguard to provide added strength for immediate results. The need for a youth vanguard is made very clear in Ferguson, Missouri, where the world has been watching our youth confront a militarized police force prepared to fire on unarmed Black citizens. With these courageous youth directly in the line of fire, at that moment we were too close to a line we do not want to cross.

National Afrikan Amerikan Family Reunion Association brings families together to free...

The National Afrikan Amerikan Family Reunion Association, NAAFRA, a non-profit family movement, is working to bring those families who have not yet experienced the joy of family reunions – and all Black families – into one national movement. Our family movement needs these families to come together in NAAFRA’s Family Operational Unity Plan for positive change.

Yuri Kochiyama: A life in struggle

Her name was Yuri, a Japanese woman born in the United States. I hesitate to call her a Japanese-American, for to do so suggests she was a citizen. In light of how she, her family and her community were treated during World War II, especially after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, to call any of them citizens would be an exaggeration. Yuri Kochiyama, freedom fighter, after 93 summers, has become an ancestor.

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