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Posts Tagged with "Mumia Abu Jamal"

Messing with Major

September 30, 2015

Major George Tillery is a Pennsylvania lifer, 65, who confronted SCI Mahanoy Superintendent John Kerestes over Mumia Abu-Jamal’s deteriorating health. Prison authorities retaliated against Major Tillery – repeatedly ransacked his cell and denied him medical treatment for seeking medical assistance for Mumia and other prisoners. Tillery was transferred to SCI Frackville and then falsely charged with drug possession, disciplined and given six months in “the hole.”

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
'Writing on the Wall' by Mumia Abu Jamal cover

Mumia Abu-Jamal’s eighth book: ‘Writing on the Wall’

September 26, 2015

Mumia Abu-Jamal’s eighth book written from prison cells in the state of Pennsylvania, USA, is a selection of 107 essays that date from January 1982 to October 2014. They cover practically the entire period of his incarceration as an internationally recognized political prisoner. Most of the pieces were written while he was on death row after being framed for the murder of police officer Daniel Faulkner on Dec. 9, 1981, in the city of Philadelphia.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
Alvaro Luna Hernandez

Revolutionary eulogy by Texas Chicano POW-political prisoner Alvaro Luna Hernandez for Comrade Brother Hugo ‘Yogi Bear’ Pinell

September 17, 2015

We were saddened by the news that Yogi was murdered during an alleged “prison riot” at a Sacramento maximum security prison, after Yogi’s release from decades in solitary confinement in the California prison system. Our prison movement grieves at the loss of one of its most respected and beloved foot soldiers within the belly of this fascist beast in our mutual struggles against the common enemy of the human species.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
Recently released dissidents Aide Gallardo and Sonia Garro hold the Cuban flag during a march in Havana Jan. 11, 2015, when Cuba freed 53 prisoners. – Photo: Reuters

Cuba to release 3,522 prisoners on the eve of Pope Francis’ visit; why can’t Obama do the same?

September 17, 2015

Just prior to the visit of Pope Francis to Cuba on Sept. 19, the Cuban government has announced the release of 3,522 people being held in the country’s jails. This humanitarian gesture will include prisoners who are over 60 years of age, younger than 20, those with chronic illnesses, women and those who are close to their release dates. Why couldn’t Obama follow the Cuban example before Pope Francis continues on his tour to the U.S. on Sept. 22?

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
Mumia Abu Jamal c. 120711, when death penalty dropped, by Lisa Terry, Liaison Agency, cropped

For Mumia, we demand no retaliatory transfer and treatment to cure his Hepatitis C now!

September 16, 2015

Mumia’s attorneys have filed a lawsuit charging the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections with medical neglect. On Sept. 5, prison staff boxed up all Mumia’s personal effects from his cell while he was in the prison infirmary trying to recover from the prison’s medical malfeasance and neglect that nearly killed him. A retaliatory transfer to some other prison would be a new blow against Mumia’s health, and would steep him and his family in greater fear and uncertainty.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
On Aug. 30, 2005, one day after Katrina flooded the 9th Ward, a woman who herself may have been in mortal danger mourns the death of a loved one.

From Katrina to Ferguson

September 5, 2015

It’s been 10 years since the watery carnage of Katrina, and one year since the fiery rage lit the night skies of Ferguson, Missouri, and between the two harrowing events lay the state of Black America isolated, demonized and damned. When the levees broke and the rushing waters of Hurricane Katrina swept into the wards of New Orleans, the 9th Ward – the Blackest ward – received the greatest damage, and the least relief.

Kambui Nantambu Jamaa 031914, web cropped

The other death sentence: Deliberate indifference at Corcoran SHU

August 28, 2015

“Deliberate indifference” is defined as “the act(s) or omissions of a prison official who knows that the prisoner faces a substantial risk of serious harm or significant pain and disregards that risk by not taking reasonable measures to abate it.” But what happens when deliberate indifference is longstanding, pervasive, well documented and expressly noted by officials over the course of time. Yet the state does nothing to correct it?

Filed Under: Prison Stories
When thousands marched in St. Louis for Ferguson October, Black activist support for Palestine was prominent. – Photo: Christopher Hazou

1,000 Black activists, scholars and artists sign statement supporting freedom and equality for Palestinian people

August 21, 2015

Over 1,000 Black activists, artists, scholars, students and organizations have released a statement reaffirming their “solidarity with the Palestinian struggle and commitment to the liberation of Palestine’s land and people.” “We urge people of conscience to recognize the struggle for Palestinian liberation as a key matter of our time,” the statement asserts.

Filed Under: Africa and the World
Hugo Pinell, Shirley, his late wife

Beloved political prisoner Hugo ‘Yogi Bear’ Pinell, feared and hated by guards, assassinated in Black August after 46 years in solitary

August 14, 2015

Black August adds another hero and martyr to the roll. By some accounts, it was his first day on the yard after 46 years in solitary confinement when Hugo “Yogi” Pinell was assassinated Aug. 12. Prison guards celebrated on social media: “May he rot in hell” and “Good riddens” (sic), they typed. Yogi was the only member of the San Quentin 6 still in prison, and his role in the events of Aug. 21, 1971, the day George Jackson was assassinated, has earned the guards’ incessant enmity ever since.

Filed Under: Prison Stories

Trump and the politics of resentment

August 7, 2015

When New York billionaire and GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump launched into his anti-immigrant tirade against Mexicans crossing the border, he was using a long known political technique of plugging into the live wire of American resentment of “the other.” Today, it’s Latinos, of course – more precisely, those from South of the border: Mexicans, Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Hondurans and the like.

Protest at Robert E. Lee Circle. Lee was the commander in chief of the Confederate States of America. People wore “Resurrect the Village: Unity Equals Power” t-shirts. The chant was, “Take down Robert E. Lee and all symbols of white supremacy!” – Photo: Wanda Sabir

Wanda’s Picks for August 2015

August 7, 2015

The Third Annual Hon. Marcus Mosiah Garvey B’Earthday and Community Celebration is Saturday, Aug. 15, 2-5 p.m. Gather at the “Abundant Knowledge” mural at Marcus Books. Please bring your immense wisdom, families, original books by Garvey, red-black-green items and drums. And don’t forget to bring some funds – as each participant will receive a 10 percent discount on every item purchased that afternoon.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
Mumia 2015

Mumia Abu-Jamal has active Hepatitis C, is suing prison for medical neglect

August 4, 2015

On Aug. 3, 2015, political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal’s lawyers filed an amended lawsuit suing Pennsylvania state prison staff for medical neglect. Two days prior, Abu-Jamal was informed by prison medical staff that he has active Hepatitis C, which his outside doctors believe is the underlying cause of severe medical conditions. The prison is currently refusing to provide Abu-Jamal with any treatment for Hepatitis C.

Called “Chicago shows love to Jon Burge torture victims,” supporters staged a dramatic demonstration in the snow on Feb. 14, 2015, as Chicago deliberated reparations. The long line named 118 victims, including Aaron Patterson. – Photo: Sarah Jane Rhee

Attorney Demitrus Evans on the case of political prisoner Aaron Patterson

July 9, 2015

I caught up with Aaron Patterson’s lawyer, attorney Demitrus Evans, to get the story firsthand. This will be the first in a series of stories that I am working on to expose the cases of current day Black political prisoners in this country, because it is very important that our people know the truth about how this government deals with the people who truly do work on behalf of our empowerment.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories


July 2, 2015

White supremacy is the mother’s milk of Charleston, of South Carolina, of the South, of America. For surely as slavery funded and built America, the underlying principle was the devaluation, exploitation and oppression of Black life. It’s the only thing that makes the church massacre in Charleston even remotely intelligible. Nine Black people were sacrificed to the blind idol of white supremacy.

Mumia was gravely ill when Johanna, with Abdul Jon and Pam Africa, visited him on April 6, 2015.

Johanna Fernandez: We need to bring Mumia home!

June 17, 2015

I visited Mumia this past Saturday, June 13. Mumia was in good spirits. We talked about the happenings of the world, and he shared a lot about his stay at Geisinger Medical Center. It is clear that the hospital contained the spread of skin lesions that were out of control, and in so doing contained the worst symptoms of a serious skin disease. But the skin disease itself remains active all over his body and undiagnosed.

Marylin Zuniga

Teacher fired for students’ get-well letters to Mumia says we should rethink ‘leadership’

May 30, 2015

Support for the now-suspended New Jersey teacher who allowed her third-graders to write get-well letters to former Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal was undeniable at the fateful Orange Public School Board meeting April 14. Supporters flanking both sides of Marylin Zuniga called for her reinstatement while she appealed to the board to allow her to continue teaching after the highly-criticized writing activity.

Supporters of Mumia Abu-Jamal marched to stop his execution by medical neglect in Berlin in April 2015. – Video: Anton Mestin

German Solidarity Address for the May 13, 2015, MOVE Commemoration

May 13, 2015

At this 30th anniversary of the MOVE massacre in Philadelphia, we here in Germany feel very close to you even despite the physical divide of more than 4,000 miles. The daily incidents of brutal police violence against African Americans but also poor white folk in recent months have shocked millions of people in Europe and Germany out of ideas that were perhaps somewhat naïve before into reality.

A crowd gathers to watch the conflagration, which had consumed the entire 6200 block of Osage Avenue in a Black middle-class neighborhood by the time the firefighters were told to aim their hoses at it.

The barbaric police bombing of MOVE: May 13th at 30

May 12, 2015

Why should we care what happened on May 13th, 1985? Because what happened then is a harbinger of what’s happening now – all across America. I don’t mean bombing people – not yet, that is. I mean the visceral hatred and violent contempt once held for MOVE is now visited upon average people – not just radicals and revolutionaries, like MOVE. A free screening of “Let the Fire Burn,” the documentary on the police bombing of MOVE in Philadelphia, takes place on the 30th anniversary of the bombing, Wednesday, May 13, 7-10 p.m., at Omni Oakland Commons.

Filed Under: California and the U.S.
Mumia is glowing here, on Feb. 6, 2012, shortly after he was released from 30 years of solitary confinement on death row to “general population,” or the mainline. Recent photos show how terribly sick he is, due to gross medical neglect and abuse by the prison.

The impact of Mumia on me: Reflections on Mumia Abu-Jamal

May 8, 2015

Mumia walked through the halls of my school, but no students know about Mumia. I believe that Mumia should be taught in all Philadelphia high schools because he is just as important as Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks. The school district of Philadelphia should have Mumia in the curriculum. Mumia inspires me to keep fighting for my rights.

Wanda’s Picks for May 2015

May 4, 2015

Happy Mother’s Day to all the nurturers, both female and male. Congratulations to all the graduates, beginning this month and continuing through June. Condolences to all the recent victims of state violence and those families and communities affected, especially in Baltimore. Much love, light and wellness to Mumia Abu Jamal; love and light to Brother Albert Woodfox.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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