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Posts Tagged with "oil"

Samantha Power’s latest crusade: Central African Republic

December 25, 2013

Samantha Power, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, spoke yesterday in Bangui, the capital of the war torn Central African Republic, on the border of the northern Democratic Republic of the Congo this week. Power announced that the U.S. will spend $100 million to support the French military intervention now underway in the Central African Republic, where 1,000 people were killed on one day, Dec. 6, in the country’s capital city.

Alima Olga Kasongo, the Boondocks and the Congo

December 7, 2013

Twenty-six year-old Congolese American science student Alima Kasongo should inspire anyone facing enormous odds, most of all her own Congolese people, who have faced the most enormous odds thrown at any people in the world for so many years. For good reason, many have said that if there were peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), there would be peace on earth.

Letter to my Rwandan, Ugandan and Congolese brothers and sisters celebrating M23’s defeat

November 10, 2013

Rwanda’s M23 has finally been defeated in DR Congo, but what are we to make of DR Congo negotiating with M23, not Rwanda’s Kagame and Uganda’s Museveni? M23 was commanded by Rwanda’s top military officers and officials, but its collaboration with Uganda is clear to anyone who gives the Great Lakes Region any attention, as is Rwanda and Uganda’s collaboration with the Western powers.

African unity at 50: Integration is the only way – Samia Nkrumah

May 31, 2013

By rejecting continental unity, Africa is depriving itself of wealth and autonomy, says Kwame Nkrumah’s daughter. The main objective of linking up with the African diaspora is to restore the dignity of Africans that was diminished after slavery and colonialism. We came to realize that our very survival socially, economically and politically depends on that unity.

Women of the Congo decry U.S. neocolonialism

March 29, 2013

This letter, signed by Diaspora Congolese women in the U.S., U.K., Belgium, France and South Africa, was delivered to Ambassador Carson on March 20. We are writing to you with regard to the current U.S. policy position on “Lasting Solution to Instability” in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which you presented on Feb. 11, 2013, at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Victory for Chávez is a victory for Latin America

October 9, 2012

With 54.42 percent of a record-turnout vote, Hugo Chávez has won a fourth term as president of Venezuela, in a race widely recognized as a crucial struggle between the progressive forces of the “Bolivarian Revolution” and the right-wing opposition of U.S.-backed Henrique Capriles.

The truth about the situation in Libya

August 24, 2011

Libya is a small country of just over 6 million people, but it possesses the largest oil reserves in all of Africa. The oil produced there is especially coveted because of its particularly high quality. The Air Force of the United States along with Britain and France has carried out 7,459 bombing attacks since March 19. Britain, France and the United States sent special operation ground forces and commando units to direct the military operations of the so-called rebel fighters – it is a NATO-led army in the field.

Open Letter from an African to American President Barack Obama on the war in Libya

July 8, 2011

It is with a heavy heart that I am writing this letter to appeal to you to take heed of the message that the House of Representatives sent out to Americans on June 24 by rejecting the text authorizing U.S. military intervention in Libya and ending the on-going attacks against the Libyan people with the most extravagant excuses, like the attacks are there to protect them.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Libya’s neighborhoods prepare for NATO boots

July 6, 2011

On June 28, 2011, the Libyan Ministry of Health made available to this observer its compilation which documents that during the first 100 days of NATO targeting of civilians, 6,121 were killed or injured.

The media fog of war

June 21, 2011

NATO’s decision to intervene in Libya on humanitarian grounds has become an alarming and revealing assessment of America’s understanding of war. The way the “established” media portrayed the Libyan conflict, and its subsequent reception, illustrates our society’s failure to recognize how the power dynamics of plutocratic governance shape our realities.

Africa for the Africans: U.S.-Euro forces out of Libya and Cote d’Ivoire

April 23, 2011

“All of our institutions have failed us if they do not use their power and act against this crime against humanity being carried out in Africa today. I received a call this morning from an Ivorian friend who calls it genocide what Sarkozy’s troops are doing there. Blood, blood, everywhere. Depleted uranium in Libya. Generations to come will suffer the health effects. We must try to stop President Obama. He has the power to say no. So far, he is good at saying yes to all the wrong people. So we must do more than we think we can. Anything less places more blood on everyone’s hands.” – Cynthia McKinney

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Cynthia McKinney on President Obama and Libya, Japan and 9/11 truth

April 1, 2011

I am pleased to stand with my colleagues today who are outraged at Nobel Peace Laureate President Obama’s decision to wage war on Africa in Libya. At the outset, let me state that Libya is home to tens of thousands of foreign students and guest workers. The students come from Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia. The messages I have received from concerned Africans state that these young, innocent people, inaccurately labeled by the U.S. press as “Black mercenaries,” have been trapped in hostile territory and are hated by the U.S.-allied Al Qaeda insurgents.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Libya, getting it right: a revolutionary pan-African perspective

March 8, 2011

There is no possibility of understanding what is happening in Libya within a Eurocentric framework. Libya’s system and the battle now taking place on its soil stands completely outside of the Western imagination. The battle that is being waged in Libya is fundamentally a battle between pan-African forces on the one hand, who are dedicated to the realization of Qaddafi’s vision of a united Africa, and Libyan Arab forces who look toward Europe and the Arab world for Libya’s future.

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Museveni regime denies Kato’s murder was homophobic

January 29, 2011

How can Ugandan Deputy Police Spokesperson Vincent Sekate, before doing an investigation, be so sure that David Kato’s murder had nothing to do with his being openly gay or with his work as advocacy officer for Sexual Minorities Uganda? And why does the U.S. keep throwing money and weaponry behind the regime that Sekate speaks for?

Sudan: The price of separation

January 14, 2011

The extraordinary voter turnout and jubilation at the polls this week in Southern Sudan reflect the desire of so many to free themselves from decades of oppression and marginalization by successive Northern-dominated regimes. The government failed to make unity a viable option.

Venezuela and climate change: Change the system, not the climate

October 18, 2010

Venezuela strives to protect its natural environment, better use oil resources to promote sustainable development and ensure that climate change remains a central topic of discussion requiring concerted efforts from the world’s countries.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Enough! wants peace in Sudan but war in Congo

June 17, 2009

Now while all these militias, rebel groups and armies have been causing horrific wars at great cost to human lives in central Africa, so-called developed countries have been enjoying a lifestyle that is sustained in large part by the resources that come from Africa. The DRC supplies the world’s diamonds, coltan, tantalite, oil and so forth.

Shell agrees to pay for Ken Saro-Wiwa’s death but denies complicity

June 11, 2009

“Have you forgotten the holocaust? Have you forgotten the gulags in Russia? Communism, nazism, fascism did not come from Africa. … A Western country was the first to use weapons of mass destruction in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Those countries have been able to rise. Africa, there is hope,” Bishop Tutu assured.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Niger Delta v. Shell Oil case postponed as government burns, loots villages

June 4, 2009

“Due to the media blockout, Americans may not realize that a rise in the price of gas at the pump is related to bloodshed in the Niger Delta,” said Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies. “As one of the largest consumers of Nigerian crude, the United States government cannot stand idly by and watch innocent civilians being killed, starved and maimed.”

Africans reject U.S. Africa Command

October 10, 2008

On Oct. 1, the much-anticipated United States Africa Command (Africom) was officially launched. This military reorganization of U.S. forces to oversee developments in the entire continent has been met with strong objection from the major political states and regional blocs there.

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