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Posts Tagged with "police terror"

The jig is up!

November 19, 2016

Tell me, what does it mean when a white adjudicator is unmoved by the racism, oppression and police terror that Black folks in this country are subjected to but becomes unhinged when a Black man decides to demonstrate in opposition to it. Again, what does it mean? That “white adjudicator” just so happens to be United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. As for that Black man, he is no other than San Francisco 49er quarterback Colin Kaepemick.

Put your money where your knee is!

November 1, 2016

In a recent article entitled “We don’t heel, we kneel,” I wrote about the importance of supporting Colin Kaepernick as he endeavors to draw attention to the systemic racism, oppression and police terror that Black folks in this country are subjected to. It took a little time for people to engage in the act of “taking a knee,” but one by one they got on board. Now that people are following Kap’s lead, the objective is to get them to put their money where their knee is.

Poor people help ‘rich’ people redistribute stolen inherited and hoarded wealth across Mama Earth

October 28, 2016

The “Stolen Land and Hoarded Resources Redistribution, Decolonization and Community Reparations Tour for Mama Earth and its Earth Peoples” was launched last spring by POOR Magazine, led by “Poverty Skola” Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia of POOR Magazine/Prensa POBRE and fellow race, disability, indigenous scholars Leroy Moore from Krip Hop Nation and First Nations Ohlone warrior Corrina Gould of the Sogorea Land Trust. They plan to resume the tour in the coming months.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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We don’t heel, we kneel!

October 12, 2016

What Colin Kaepemick has done is not only courageous but long overdue. The game plan, henceforth, should be to turn that momentum into a nationwide movement. Yes, the best way to show solidarity and support for Colin Kaepemick is to emulate his heroic act. Stand for something bigger than “self.” You can accomplish this by taking a knee. Let’s see who has the heart, character and courage to kneel for change.

Announcement of nationally coordinated prisoner work stoppage for Sept. 9, 2016

July 3, 2016

In one voice, rising from the cells of long term solitary confinement, echoed in the dormitories and cell blocks from Virginia to Oregon, we prisoners across the United States vow to finally end slavery in 2016. On Sept. 9 of 2016, we will begin an action to shut down prisons all across this country. We will not only demand the end to prison slavery, we will end it ourselves by ceasing to be slaves.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Rhetoric vs. reality: SFPD’s investment in police brutality

February 29, 2016

“On the weekend before Super Bowl 50 in downtown San Francisco, Officer Joshua Cabillo aggressively put his hands on me. It was a peaceful protest and I sensed the hatred in his eyes,” says protester Deja Caldwell. Not only did Officer Cabillo unnecessarily assault a woman who was protesting police killing, but he is a killer cop himself! On June 5, 2012, as a South San Francisco police officer, Joshua Cabillo brutalized, restrained and eventually shot to death 15-year-old Derrick Gaines. Officer Cabillo is a child killer with a long record of abuse, yet SFPD hired him.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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Remembering Oakland rebel Lovelle Mixon

February 28, 2016

March 21 marks the seventh anniversary of one of the biggest events in Oakland history and in the nation’s fight against police terror in recent times. I am talking about the police murder of Lovelle Mixon two months after the videotaped police execution of Oscar Grant. Mixon’s fearlessness, audacity and strength in the heat of battle against the police, who have been rampantly killing Black people in Oakland’s Black community with impunity for decades, created a snowball effect of frustration and courage, which, in combination with the half a dozen rebellions in downtown Oakland surrounding the Grant case, pushed the tide of popular opinion in California towards the conviction of Mehserle.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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Black-Brown solidarity today: Families of Mario Woods and Alex Nieto march to demand justice for slain victims of police terror

January 6, 2016

One month after SFPD killed Mario Woods, the family of Alex Nieto is joining Black Lives Matter SF and other community organizations in a solidarity march with Woods’ family. The march will start Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016, in Bernal Heights and Bayview Hunters Point, with the two groups meeting in the middle for a solidarity ceremony. SFPD has turned San Francisco into the eighth deadliest city in the country in terms of killings by police.

No justice, no peace: Black SF demands Mayor Ed Lee fire Chief Greg Suhr and killer cops!

December 29, 2015

Once a killer cop, always a killer cop! Black San Francisco is demanding that Mayor Ed Lee face the music and fire Chief Greg Suhr, as well as the five officers involved in the execution of Mario Woods, a young man with special needs who was gunned down by five gang members of the SFPD. Records reveal that many of the officers involved had used deadly force on unarmed individuals in the past.

The ‘First Friday’ doc premieres this week at the New Parkway

November 4, 2015

Filmmaker N’Jeri Eaton hooked up with film cinematographer Mario Furloni to tell the story of the monthly “First Friday” festival in downtown Oakland in a documentary that includes the Oakland police murder of Alan Blueford on May 6, 2012, weeks before his high school graduation and the “First Friday” shooting in 2013 that claimed the life of victim Kiante Campbell. Check out filmmakers N’Jeri Eaton and Mario Furloni in their own words …

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Mumia Abu-Jamal’s eighth book: ‘Writing on the Wall’

September 26, 2015

Mumia Abu-Jamal’s eighth book written from prison cells in the state of Pennsylvania, USA, is a selection of 107 essays that date from January 1982 to October 2014. They cover practically the entire period of his incarceration as an internationally recognized political prisoner. Most of the pieces were written while he was on death row after being framed for the murder of police officer Daniel Faulkner on Dec. 9, 1981, in the city of Philadelphia.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Brando narrates new must-see documentary, ‘Listen to Me Marlon’

July 28, 2015

“Listen to Me Marlon” is a documentary film by Stevan Riley that takes a candid look at the life, activism and work of the legendary, charismatic and mercurial film icon Marlon Brando, whose career spanned five decades. The late Brando narrates the film exclusively with sound taken from hundreds of hours of audio that he himself recorded privately over the course of 40 years.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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California is not for rich people only! First Nation, Black, Brown and poor people stand together to take the state back for the people

May 15, 2015

From Oakland to Salinas, from San Francisco to Vallejo, hundreds of Black, Brown, First Nation and Poor people stood together on May 7 and 8 to demand the end of displacement, police terror and criminalization and the increasing apartheidization of this state. We are all connected. Our work and our revolutions can be stronger if we work together and support each other. To add your case to the elder and child abuse cases against speculators or to get involved in the statewide effort to resist a rich-people-only state, contact poormag@gmail.com.

From Selma to San Francisco, BlackLivesMatter from 1963 to 2015

February 2, 2015

Students of the Revolutionary Youth Media Education class at Deecolonize Academy haven been learning, writing and living police terror and resistance as children of Black, Brown and poor parents. On Jan. 19, all of the youth skolaz at Deecolonize Academy and adult poverty skolaz at POOR Magazine began the day marching for MLK, for Black lives and for all of us, followed up by a trip to see the movie “Selma” and ended with a die-in outside the movie theatre in SF.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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National Day of Action: It’s right to rebel!

October 27, 2014

October 22nd, National Day of Action – after weeks of planning, the day had finally arrived. Today we would gather in groups big and small all around the country to speak truth to power: “Black lives matter!” “Stop killing us off!” “We demand a stop to police violence and police brutality!” “We demand an end to mass incarceration!” My National Day of Action started in San Francisco.

Jury set in historic trial of cop who killed Oscar Grant – no Black jurors

June 9, 2010

Phyllis Jackson thought “it was a chilling day” for Los Angeles. “Jury selection here banishes all Black people like the recent Equal Justice Initiative report found that Southern courts do, while allowing the jury to be stacked with people who have friends, family and businesses involved with law enforcement,” she said. Everybody out for the Mass Protest for Justice for Oscar Grant Monday, June 14, 8 a.m., at the LA courthouse.

Three perspectives: Police terror kills 7-year-old girl

May 19, 2010

“Damn Detroit Police Department! You burned, shot and killed Aiyana Jones, a little 7-year-old girl. You threw a stun grenade through the front window and lit the little girl’s blanket on fire! And then you shot off a bullet that landed in her neck!” – Read this account by Kimora Lee Simmons, another by a 12-year-old girl and the full story by veteran Detroit journalist Abayomi Azikiwe.

Poor News Network TV: Justice for Oscar Grant

January 10, 2009

For six hours on Thursday, Jan. 8, an apologetic BART board of directors listened to people voice their fury over a BART police officer’s execution of Oscar Grant, a 22-year-old father, and authorities’ silence in response. With the usual time limits on testimony discarded, people poured out their hearts in impassioned demands for justice. The […]

From Amy Goodman to Nadra Foster: Implementing alternatives to police terror

September 30, 2008

The officers were waiting, loaded firearms dangling from their waists, steel filled chests puffed out, glassy stares behind helmets. She was one woman alone. She was a reporter doing her job. She was attacked by the police for no reason at all. Her only crime was being a media producer in a hostile location.

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