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Posts Tagged with "racism"

Prisoners were used to clean the beaches after the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf, the largest marine oil spill in history. Exposed to deadly toxins, they were given no protective gear, evidence that prisoners used as slave labor are expendable.

George Jackson University supports the historic Sept. 9 strike against prison slavery

September 10, 2016

Sept. 9, 2016, is the day that many people in America are wholeheartedly organizing, mobilizing, taking action, standing and locking arms in solidarity against what we know as prison slave labor – yes, legalized slavery – and people are saying, “No more!” Even though there are many taking action and answering the call to cure this particular ill of society, there is an overwhelmingly larger portion of the U.S. population who are absolutely clueless to the fact that slavery still exists.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Dr. Lane Murray Unit, TDCJ

From solitary confinement in ‘Miserable Murray,’ fighting for women in Texas prisons

September 3, 2016

I am writing seeking justice, help and assistance, fighting the cause for women in Texas prisons. I suffer daily for the wrongs I have or have not committed along with other women who don’t deserve “double jeopardy” punishment and abuse. Just being in prison is punishment enough. We need help! The slavery of prison must end. Women in prison face abuse by the hands of those who are supposed to screen us for security, not inflict harm.

Keith ‘Malik’ Washington

Hard lessons in the struggle to end prison slavery

September 1, 2016

These prison profiteers and imperialist oppressors aren’t feeling the recent show of power and solidarity among prisoners throughout AmeriKKKa. In the same manner, the FBI’s COINTELPRO sought to thwart the emergence of a Black Messiah, mass incarceration in Amerika seeks to sabotage the emergence of any movement which challenges the capitalist-imperialist plan to lock up, exploit, disenfranchise, poison and in some cases even kill the poorest cross-section of Amerikan society.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Anthony Robinson Jr. 2015, web cropped

The key or the peephole: A look inside the prison industrial complex and where movements should go from here

August 30, 2016

The Ashker decision was great, the five core demands are all good, but how come we are not writing our own regulations and attacking the “STG” scheme in totality? We know from its inception it was designed to isolate and entrap prisoners with the God given talent to awaken the prisoner class to the exploits of the system and provide those willing to organize for change with practical alternatives to prison enslavement.

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The life of Kevin Cooper, since the death penalty moratorium was lifted last November, is in more imminent danger than at any time since he came within hours of execution in 2004. Be prepared, once again, to join the campaign to save and free him. This photo was taken Oct. 23, 2013.

Is it illegal to be Black in America?

August 29, 2016

Sometime in the early 19th century, former United States President Thomas Jefferson stated, “Unchecked power twisted white men’s characters.” Since he was a slave owner and an oppressor, he should know what he speaks about! Here in the early 21st century, it still seems that within the hands of America’s criminal justice system as a whole, unchecked power has indeed “twisted” certain white people’s characters.

'Prisoners Are Striking Nationwide Sept 9' Oakland poster by BlackOUT Collective

Sept. 9: Strike against prison slavery, strike against white supremacy

August 27, 2016

On Friday, Sept. 9, on the 45th anniversary of the Attica Uprising in New York, prisoners are calling for a general strike across all prisons in the United States against prison slavery. As the initial call out for the strike stated: “Slavery is alive and well in the prison system, but by the end of this year, it won’t be anymore. … This is a call for a nationwide prisoner work stoppage to end prison slavery, starting on Sept. 9, 2016. They cannot run these facilities without us.”

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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New Orleans’ Black population is well aware and continually resisting the discrimination outlined here by their favorite lawyer, Bill Quigley, who counseled them through the storm and never stopped. Listen to WBOK, Black talk radio, to hear their astute analysis and opinions and what they’re doing about it. – Photo: Lee Celano, Reuters

Katrina Pain Index 2016: Race and class gap widening

August 22, 2016

Hurricane Katrina hit 11 years ago. Population of the City of New Orleans is down by over 95,000 people. Almost all this loss of people is in the African American community. The gap between rich and poor in New Orleans is massive, the largest in the country. Despite receiving $76 billion in assistance after Katrina, it is clear that poor and working people in New Orleans, especially African Americans, got very little of that help. Here are the numbers.

Coco Peila CD cover 2015-1, web

Coco Peila’s music has a scorching new sound

August 21, 2016

Coco Peila is one of Hip Hop musicians in the new class that is creating the new Bay Area sound. After being affiliated with Sandman of the Oakland-based Attik crew back in the day, Coco Peila is standing on her own two feet and spreading her wings. Her summer and fall is filled with an album, a mixtape, a video and multiple collaborations. Check her out in this exclusive interview.

Shujaa Graham speaks on the late George Jackson and Hugo Pinell

August 13, 2016

Legendary California Prison Movement activist and former deathrow prisoner, Shujaa Graham speaks on the inspiration and lessons that he received from brothers like the late Hugo Pinell and George Jackson, while he was a political prisoner in the 70’s. If you would like to hear more from the Block Report, you could tune into BlockReportRadio.com. […]

The FBI works through local law enforcement to shut down dissent. Here, Ieshia Evans is detained during a demonstration near police headquarters in Baton Rouge on July 9, 2016. When the 28-year-old mother of a 6-year-old, who’d never before been an activist, told her son she’d been arrested, he said, “I thought only bad people go to jail.” – Photo: Reuters

FBI gives green light to crack down on Black Lives Matter protesters – BLM statement follows

July 21, 2016

The violent events of the past week have placed the country at a decisive moment. Words matter but deeds matter more. Leadership matters. President Obama spoke about the need for real change and new “practices” following the murders by police officers of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. Following this story is a Black Lives Matter statement on the murder of police and escalating protests to end state-sponsored violence against Black people.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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At a converted movie theater in the Mission, an anti-racism event called Let’s Take Action drew a mostly white packed house on July 12. – Photo: LaRon L. Barton

Whites face race: Let’s talk and act

July 16, 2016

“Let’s Take Action,” a think tank organized by Los Angeles native Michael Morgenstern and New York transplant Joe Conte, aims to bring people together who may have a tough time talking about race but want to do something about the conditions they see. When I decided to attend this function, I had one question on my mind: Why now? Why all of a sudden are whites caring about the deaths of Black men in America at the hands of police?

On a “Stay Black and Die” video shoot are JR Valrey, Ray Luv, M1 of dead prez, Mac Mall and DLabrie.

DLabrie: The future of the Bay

July 16, 2016

When you talk about grinding and hustling for your dream, Oakland’s DLabrie has rocked mics from New York to Seoul and collaborated with some of the most intellectual rappers of our generation. A few months ago he premiered the “Stay Black and Die” video, which included appearances by rappers M1, Shamako, Mac Mall and Ray Luv, at the Oakland International Film Festival. He is definitely someone who has a lot to say. Check out DLabrie in his own words.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Your guide to Black history, John William Templeton, points to one of his books, “Come to the Water,” in a National Park Service centennial library display.

John William Templeton finds African American history in places like Yosemite, Nob Hill and Beverly Hills

July 1, 2016

Head of the educational television network ReUNION: Education-Arts-Heritage, the sleuth, John William Templeton, is bringing vacationers along for the ride during a mapping expedition for the California African American Freedom Trail in July. The first part is a special tour of “Famous Names of Bayview” Saturday, July 2, leaving from Sam Jordan’s, 4004 Third St.

Muhammad Ali leaves the armed forces induction center with his entourage after refusing to be drafted into the armed forces in Houston, Texas, April 28, 1967. – Photo: AP

‘I just wanted to be free’: The radical reverberations of Muhammad Ali

June 5, 2016

The reverberations. Not the rumbles, the reverberations. The death of Muhammad Ali will undoubtedly move people’s minds to his epic boxing matches against Joe Frazier and George Foreman, or there will be retrospectives about his epic “rumbles” against racism and war. But it’s the reverberations that we have to understand in order to see Muhammad Ali as what he remains: the most important athlete to ever live.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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This is the prison that the women locked up inside it call “Miserable Murray.”

I am fighting for women in Texas prisons

May 31, 2016

I am a walking, living proof of a life that has been pulverized, destroyed and abandoned by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. I have been housed in Ad-Seg going on four years now, held in captivity of prolonged solitary confinement, deprived of adequate sleep, nourishment, clean ventilation, peace and privileges. Living in the misery of Ad-Seg causes much psychological damage. Justice needs to be served.

Byron Gill

Racism reigns at James Rolph Park, San Francisco

May 30, 2016

On May 12, 2016, Black gardener Byron Gill, who works for the City of San Francisco, was informed that a San Francisco Superior Court jury rejected his retaliation claim against his employer, SF Recreation and Park. Gill, represented by attorney Gregory P. Brock, described the matter in his closing arguments as “death by a thousand cuts.” He painted a picture of employer retaliation and harassment.

George Washington Eames Jr. was the longtime president of the Baton Rouge NAACP.

‘A Small Temporary Inconvenience,’ a feature film about Black, disabled civil rights activist George Washington Eames Jr. in Jim Crow Louisiana

May 27, 2016

Cleve Bailey has taken the story of his great uncle and aunt, George and Kathy Eames, and created a screenplay entitled “A Small Temporary Inconvenience,” which chronicles the lives of this interracial couple who dedicated their lives to civil rights activism and fighting against racism in the Deep South. I caught up with Cleve, who now lives in the Bay Area in Hayward, to get his take on the film project.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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This is Abdul Olugbala Shakur’s tattoo. When CDCr or the courts ask him what it means, he says, “Don’t eat pork.”

George Jackson University – a statement from its founder

May 25, 2016

Within the California Department of Corrections (CDCr), the name George Jackson evokes both fear and hate among prison guards. His very name represents resistance – the epitome of our Black manhood – and this explains in part why the CDCr has spent the last 44 years attempting to censor the name George L. Jackson from within its prisons.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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In addition to all his other accomplishments, Luis Rodriguez was also an extraordinary artist. This is a self-portrait.

Political prisoner Luis V. Rodriguez: Aztlan warrior passes to the spirit world

April 27, 2016

Luis Valenzuela Rodriguez left this mortal world on Thursday April 14, 2016, at 7:28 p.m., surrounded by his family and friends. He was 60 years old. Songs and prayers were offered to honor him from the four directions. Luis was innocent. He fought with determination to prove his innocence for 37 years. Lies were told about him; in the media, in the courtroom. Many let him down and betrayed him, but many more loved him and stood by him.

'Black Panther's Party for Self-Defense' young Panther beside sign on wall, cropped

On self-defense against racist murder

April 26, 2016

For us to make sense of the relentless, 400-year-long onslaught of racist violence against New Afrikans and other nationally oppressed people in Amerika and the absence of a collective program of comprehensive self-defense and secure communities among the majority of the New Afrikan population in the U.S., it’s important we first grasp the origin of this contradiction, as all other points of contradiction and irrationality flow from it.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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