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Posts Tagged with "racism"

In addition to all his other accomplishments, Luis Rodriguez was also an extraordinary artist. This is a self-portrait.

Political prisoner Luis V. Rodriguez: Aztlan warrior passes to the spirit world

April 27, 2016

Luis Valenzuela Rodriguez left this mortal world on Thursday April 14, 2016, at 7:28 p.m., surrounded by his family and friends. He was 60 years old. Songs and prayers were offered to honor him from the four directions. Luis was innocent. He fought with determination to prove his innocence for 37 years. Lies were told about him; in the media, in the courtroom. Many let him down and betrayed him, but many more loved him and stood by him.

'Black Panther's Party for Self-Defense' young Panther beside sign on wall, cropped

On self-defense against racist murder

April 26, 2016

For us to make sense of the relentless, 400-year-long onslaught of racist violence against New Afrikans and other nationally oppressed people in Amerika and the absence of a collective program of comprehensive self-defense and secure communities among the majority of the New Afrikan population in the U.S., it’s important we first grasp the origin of this contradiction, as all other points of contradiction and irrationality flow from it.

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An Oakland shipyard worker in 1943 takes a break. – Photo: Dorothea Lange, courtesy Oakland Museum of California

Joe Debro on racism in construction, Part 14

April 24, 2016

A 1968 book-length report, titled “A Study of the Manpower Implications of Small Business Financing: A Survey of 149 Minority and 202 Anglo-Owned Small Businesses in Oakland, California,” was sent to the Bay View by its author, Joseph Debro, prior to his death in November 2013, and his family has kindly permitted the Bay View to publish it. This is Part 14 of the report.

Police officers texting by Arlen, Twitter

2nd SFPD texting scandal: Officers’ racist text messages condemned by public defender, supervisors and mayor

April 10, 2016

San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi issued a statement on April 1 on the news that a second group of SFPD officers exchanged racist and homophobic text messages and sent a letter to District Attorney George Gascón on the topic. Mayor Edwin M. Lee issued a statement April 4 after meeting with the San Francisco Police Department’s Police Employee Groups. At the full Board of Supervisors meeting April 5, Supervisor Malia Cohen and Board President London Breed issued a joint statement regarding the racist and homophobic text messages.

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About the name of the play, director Bill English says: “In the last 10-15 years, ‘Jerusalem,’ the song based on a poem by William Blake, has become the unofficial national anthem of England. Sung at every rugby match, it has become the ‘people’s’ anthem. Originally, Blake was lamenting the destruction of British rural life by the industrial revolution, but today the English have adopted his battle cry to the sanctity of common man against incursion of corporate and government control.”

Wanda’s Picks for April 2016

April 3, 2016

“Dr. Mutulu Is Welcome Here” is the title of the campaign and the program Malcolm X Grassroots Movement hosted Easter Sunday, Resurrection Day, in Oakland. As we walked into Sole Space, a venue that also sells shoes and art and is a part of the corner building that houses Oakstop, we were invited to pose with a photo of Dr. Shakur. Mama Ayanna, seated at the door, welcomes and greets comrades and friends of friends as other members of MXGM host the program.

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Hugo Pinell, who survived over 45 years of solitary confinement torture, was not allowed a contact visit with his daughter, Allegra, until days before his assassination. This photo was taken Aug. 2, 2015. He was murdered on Aug. 12.

Our hero has not been forgotten

April 3, 2016

Many times conscious prisoners become lost in their own image and forget the representation of the people as a whole. Our loss came with the death of Hugo Pinell. His introduction is not needed. He helped bring life to a generation that had not – and some still to this day still have not – forgotten the bigger picture. As conscious prisoners and political prisoners behind enemy lines, we as a community cannot forget to reach out to his daughter.

Unique, Fale, Xlisha, Dre’Zhane and Kira of Hunters Point’s Girls 2000 talked extensively to Dr. Ray Tompkins about the history of pollution and air quality in Bayview Hunters Point at the Black Health Summit held on March 19 at San Francisco State University. – Photo: Xlisha Laurent

Dr. Raymond Tompkins: How and why does pollution poison Bayview Hunters Point?

March 31, 2016

Although Bayview Hunters Point is one of the most beautiful Black communities in California, it is also one of the most toxic places in the country due to the radiation experiments that took place on the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in the ‘40s and many other generators of deadly toxins, most of them government owned. Dr. Ray Tompkins, a historian and a scientific expert on the pollution in Bayview Hunters Point, gives an in-depth interview. Check him out in his own words.

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Holman Prison rebellion prisoners, fire 031116 by prisoners, cropped

Critical Resistance and IWW support prisoner resistance at Holman, call for action

March 19, 2016

Our attention has been turned this week to Holman Prison in Alabama where rolling uprisings inside have led to prisoners taking control of certain areas of the prison. Prisoners have since released a set of demands including increased educational programs for prisoners, monetary damages for physical and mental abuse, and revoking the State’s 446 laws that – similar to Three Strikes laws – harden sentences for subsequent convictions.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Bill and Hillary Clinton leave a Wall Street event. – Photo: A. Katz, Shutterstock

The Clintons’ $93 million romance with Wall Street: a catastrophe for working families, African-Americans and Latinos

March 16, 2016

For 24 years Bill and Hillary Clinton have courted Wall Street money with notable success. No other political couple in modern history has enjoyed so much money flowing to them from Wall Street for such a long time – $92.57 million over a quarter century. Because of the Clintons’ romance with Wall Street and their corrupt New Democratic Party, the New York bankers and the Clintons are richer today. Others – betrayed, abandoned, savaged – are not.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Berta Cáceres rallies a crowd. – Photo: HispanTV

¡Berta lives! The life and legacy of Berta Cáceres

March 16, 2016

I began writing a eulogy for Berta Isabel Cáceres Flores years ago, though she died only last week. Berta was assassinated by Honduran government-backed death squads on March 3. Like many who knew and worked with her, I was aware that this fighter was not destined to die of old age. She spoke too much truth to too much power. Long may Berta live, in the hearts, minds, passions and actions of all of us.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Chicago students march on Trump. – Photo: Chris Geovanis

How students in Chicago organized to shut down Trump

March 14, 2016

The announcement of Donald Trump’s visit to the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) came one week before his scheduled March 11 appearance. Within minutes, there was a Facebook page announcing plans to protest. There was also a moveon.org petition calling on the administration at UIC to cancel the rally. By later that afternoon, over 5,000 people signed up to protest and, by later that night, 50,000 had signed the petition.

Supporters gather around the Nietos after the verdict. – Photo: Poor News Network

Fighting the system: The Alex Nieto trial lost in the courts, won in the community

March 12, 2016

Although the courts said we lost, we all know our fight for justice has just begun. Realize the issues of racism, gentrification, poverty and houselessness are all linked and so are we all. So as we continue to fight for the crumbs and bang on the systems that oppress us, we also need to build our own – for Mario, for Sandra, for Alex, for Amilcar, for O’Shaine, for Kenny, for Josiah – for so many more and for all of us.

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According to the Advocate, “Activists who interrupted a Donald Trump rally Friday night in New Orleans with chants of ‘Black lives matter’ appear to have achieved the most sustained and disruptive protest of the Republican presidential front-runner’s events to date.” – Photo: Edmund D. Fountain for The New York Times

Trumping Trump: Deafening the white noise of racial supremacy

March 11, 2016

It was a few minutes before we began chanting that I found out what we were going to do – that we were going to do anything at all besides be passive observers at the white supremacist rally disguised as a presidential campaign. My nerves churned a bit like anyone’s do as they realize they’re about to engage in an altercation that could become physical. Or violent. It’s a strange thing that happens when you know you’re in a “no turning back” situation. What you won’t do is back down from the principles on which you stand. Or turn away from the ledge from which you’ve been forced to leap.

In “Ghost Town to Havana,” the Oakland Royals play Ciudad Habana.

The Oakland International Film Festival is back

March 3, 2016

The Oakland International Film Festival is one of the premiere multi-cultural annual events in the Bay Area. Every year this festival educates Oakland and the surrounding area about the world around us, locally and internationally. I sat down with David Roach, the director of the Oakland International Film Festival, to discuss this year’s line-up and his take on what has been happening on the cinema scene and in Hollywood recently.

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Protesters hit the streets of Port au Prince en masse on Jan. 22, 2016, upon learning their constant marching had forced a postponement of the run-off election that had been scheduled for Jan. 24. – Photo: Dieu Nalio Chery, AP

Haiti rises: a time for solidarity

March 1, 2016

The voice of Haiti’s popular movement at this critical period in the country’s history has never been clearer. For the past several months, since the discredited legislative and presidential elections of last August and October, mass, vibrant protests for the right to a free and fair vote and against foreign intervention have been a relentless force, in the face of heavily-armed and well-financed adversaries and mounting repression.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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'Race' poster

‘Race,’ a review

March 1, 2016

“Race” (2016) is the story of Jesse Owens’ triumphant wins in the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin just before World War II. Nicknamed “The Buckeye Bullet” for his legendary speed, Owens distanced himself from socially constructed hurdles which ran counter to his personal goals. Directed by Stephen Hopkins, the film features rising star, Stephan James (“Selma”) as Jesse Owens.

Mesha Irizarry, mother of Idriss Stelley, who was shot 48 times on June 13, 2001, by nine SFPD officers as they burst into a Sony Metreon auditorium at Fourth and Mission in San Francisco, where Idriss sat alone during a mental health crisis, gave powerful testimony to the DOJ panel. Her Idriss Stelley Foundation has been at the forefront in demanding justice after every SFPD murder and fundamental change in the department’s policies and culture.

SFPD gets away with murder(s); Department of Justice comes to town

February 26, 2016

San Francisco is touted by conservative detractors and liberal boosters alike as the nation’s most progressive city. This is still true in many ways, even amidst towering symbols of gentrification. But, in particular, when it comes to holding police accountable for use of excessive force against communities of color, the City by the Bay is no different from the New Yorks, Chicagos, Baltimores or Fergusons of this country, where cops literally get away with murder. Think this is an exaggeration? Read on.

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When LAPD arrested Grim Sleeper suspect Lonnie Franklin Jr. in July 2010 and charged him with 10 murders, they found scores of photos of women in his home. These are a few of them. The pictures were published and distributed in hopes of identifying more victims.

Don’t disparage the victims of the ‘Grim Sleeper’ murders

February 19, 2016

Yesterday at the opening of the so-named “Grim Sleeper” trial, prosecutor Beth Silverman laid out what seemed like a strong case against the suspect. But in her opening statement, Silverman painted the victims as “prostitutes” and “crack addicts,” racist and sexist stereotypes that the Black Coalition has had to continuously object to when the police and media used them to dismiss the fact that human beings were being murdered.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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'Demand Freedom and Justice for Leonard Peltier' poster

Free Leonard Peltier, wrongly imprisoned 40 years

February 17, 2016

For 40 years, former American Indian Movement (AIM) activist Leonard Peltier has been in the clutches of the U.S. prison system –The Iron House of the whites, as indigenous people call them – on trumped up murder charges. Now, as he suffers poor health and an abdominal aortic aneurism, time is no longer on his side. The aneurism, diagnosed just weeks ago, threatens his very life, so supporters of Leonard are demanding his freedom, so he doesn’t perish in the Iron House.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Evans Gororo is a farmer near Chinamora, Zimbabwe, whose “corn is as high as an elephant’s eye,” as the song says. Blacks are proving to be even more productive farmers than the whites who stole the land from them. – Photo: AFP

Looking at Mugabe’s Zimbabwe and the African Union in 2015: an interview wit’ US correspondent to the Zimbabwean Herald Obi Egbuna

February 4, 2016

2015 was a historic political year for the African continent because one of the continent’s most radical anti-imperialist leaders chaired the African Union, and I am talking about President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe. I talked with Obi Egbuna, the U.S. correspondent for the Zimbabwean national newspaper, The Herald, about what President Mugabe accomplished leading Zimbabwe and the African Union in 2015. Here is what he had to say.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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