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Posts Tagged with "South Africa"

Outstanding women leaders of the Black Panther era

Wanda’s Picks for May-June 2016

May 15, 2016

Elaine Brown’s “A Taste of Power,” a memoir which chronicles her leadership of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense when co-founder Huey P. Newton is imprisoned, still resonates with me. The idea that a Black woman is nominated to the leadership position of the most powerful civic organization in the country at that time is still remarkable and speaks to what Kathleen Cleaver calls revolutionary imagination.

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Dr. Walter Rodney lectures, cropped

Half the story has never been told: Commission of Inquiry into the death of Walter Rodney was a farce

March 25, 2016

This article was prompted by the unrelenting campaign by friends and associates of the late Dr. Walter Rodney, to maintain the false accusation that Forbes Burnham ordered Walter Rodney’s assassination. Many of these academics and commentators are not Guyanese and do not fully understand the circumstances in 1980 that led to Walter Rodney’s demise. The adage, chanted by Bob Marley, that “half the story has never been told” is 100 percent correct.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Evans Gororo is a farmer near Chinamora, Zimbabwe, whose “corn is as high as an elephant’s eye,” as the song says. Blacks are proving to be even more productive farmers than the whites who stole the land from them. – Photo: AFP

Looking at Mugabe’s Zimbabwe and the African Union in 2015: an interview wit’ US correspondent to the Zimbabwean Herald Obi Egbuna

February 4, 2016

2015 was a historic political year for the African continent because one of the continent’s most radical anti-imperialist leaders chaired the African Union, and I am talking about President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe. I talked with Obi Egbuna, the U.S. correspondent for the Zimbabwean national newspaper, The Herald, about what President Mugabe accomplished leading Zimbabwe and the African Union in 2015. Here is what he had to say.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Former Rwandan military officer Robert Higiro testifies before a Congressional subcommittee on May 15, 2015.

US State Department warns Rwandan dissident to evade assassins

November 22, 2015

The Canadian Globe and Mail reports that the United States has warned former Rwandan military officer Robert Higiro that his life is in danger because of evidence he gave to The Globe and Mail, to the BBC and to a U.S. House Subcommittee about the Rwandan government’s alleged efforts to assassinate dissidents who had fled abroad. KPFA’s Ann Garrison has the story.

LeeAhna Smith and LaShonda Taylor eagerly await our departure from SFO.

Mack reports back from their South Africa trip

October 28, 2015

Our community report back will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 6:30-9 p.m., at the McClymonds Youth and Family Center (Game Room) located on McClymonds High School’s campus, 2607 Myrtle St., West Oakland. This trip wasn’t just for me or my students; it was for our community. We will show footage of the trip, allow young people to tell their stories, and do a panel so that members of the community can ask questions and learn from our students.

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Students from the University of Johannesburg clash with campus security officers, as they attempt to enter inside the university, on October 22, 2015, in Johannesburg, during a protest against university fee hikes. University activism has been increasing this year as students vent their anger over the limited racial transformation in education since racist white-minority rule ended with Nelson Mandela's election in 1994. Many students says higher fees -- which could rise by 10 percent a year -- will further prevent poorer black youths gaining university education. AFP PHOTO / MUJAHID SAFODIEN        (Photo credit should read MUJAHID SAFODIEN/AFP/Getty Images)

Victory for South African youth: Besieged Zuma announces 0% university fee increases

October 23, 2015

President Zuma just announced live on national television that there shall be no university fee increases for 2016. This is a major victory for the thousands of youth who have been struggling for more than a week against the attacks on their education. Zuma was meeting with vice-chancellors from all universities at the Union Buildings, the seat of government. The sight of thousands of students besieging this symbol of power will reverberate throughout South African society.

Dr. Chris Zamani explores the gracefully curving stone walls of the ancient city known as Great Zimbabwe, the capital of a booming trading empire that flourished in gold-rich Southern Africa between the 11th and 15th centuries.

Bay Area Black doctor plans to repatriate to South Africa

October 19, 2015

I talked to a future repatriate, my comrade Dr. Chris Zamani, about his recent trip to South Africa in search of a homeland and a place for him to stick his flag. I talked to him about some of the factors that he has to consider in order to prepare to make that move. He has a very interesting outlook on history and life that is driving his decision to want to leave the U.S., and I wanted to share this ongoing conversation that we have been having with each other for the last few years. Check out Dr. Zamani in his own words …

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Representative or the represented?

October 19, 2015

Recently, Congresswoman Corinne Brown revealed that white legislators from Florida’s redistricting body changed her district to include the state’s overcrowded but under-represented prisons. If the Congressional Black Caucus had fought for and prevailed on prisoner enfranchisement, Rep. Brown would have no viable argument against her redistricting, for prisoners would be allowed to vote as everyone else.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez declares his nation’s support for Muammar Qaddafi and an independent Libya on Feb. 25, 2011, and implacable opposition to a Western invasion.

World politics: 4 years after Qaddafi, 2 years after Chavez

September 20, 2015

International journalist and freedom fighter correspondent Gerald Perriera speaks on world politics four years after the assassination of Qaddafi and two years after Chavez, covering Libya, Eritrea, Ivory Coast, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Venezuela, Guyana, Mali, Niger, France, the U.S. and more. “Libya is a failed state,” Perriera observes, since Qaddafi’s Jamahiriya was destroyed, with several factions and many militias “all doing their own thing.” Some 3 million Libyans who supported Qaddafi now live in exile. Libyans throughout the country demonstrated against the death sentence for Qaddafi’s son, Saif.

When thousands marched in St. Louis for Ferguson October, Black activist support for Palestine was prominent. – Photo: Christopher Hazou

1,000 Black activists, scholars and artists sign statement supporting freedom and equality for Palestinian people

August 21, 2015

Over 1,000 Black activists, artists, scholars, students and organizations have released a statement reaffirming their “solidarity with the Palestinian struggle and commitment to the liberation of Palestine’s land and people.” “We urge people of conscience to recognize the struggle for Palestinian liberation as a key matter of our time,” the statement asserts.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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The Movement for Black Lives Convening walks the talk, rescues teen from cops: We are the ones we’ve been waiting for

August 11, 2015

Do they think that we are stupid? We were there. We have the pictures. We have the video. We heard what they said. We saw what they did. Yet, publications blatantly misrepresent the truth, posing serious harm to Black lives. These misrepresentations actively push forth a narrative that absolves law enforcement of the brutality and racism they inflict and, ultimately, blame victims for their own repression. We are not here for it.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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The young leaders who have been studying and fundraising all year for their trip to South Africa are scheduled to leave in a few days but have not yet raised all the money they need. Please help as generously as you can.

West Oakland youth are going to South Africa

July 16, 2015

Over the years, Kharyishi Wigington has been a tireless advocate for empowering West Oakland youth at McClymonds High School. She is at it again, this time taking a group of students on a cultural exchange to South Africa. The young leaders who have been studying and fundraising all year for their trip to South Africa are scheduled to leave in a few days but have not yet raised all the money they need. Please help as generously as you can.

These are four of the Seven Samurai – Essie Mormen, Blanche Bebb, Margaret Block and Shirley Enomoto – at Delancey Street Restaurant in 2001.

Tribute to civil rights activist Margaret Block

June 29, 2015

Margaret Stroud Block, long time civil rights activist, passed away June 20 in Cleveland, Mississippi, where she was born and raised. She lectured at universities and organizations throughout the U.S., particularly in the eastern part of the country, on civil rights and current education policies. Margaret was a dear friend. We met each other in the mid-‘80s when Proposition J was proposed.

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Hundreds march on April 8 in Durban to protest xenophobic violence sweeping the country, as South African resentment explodes, blaming immigrants from other African countries for “taking our jobs.” Many agree that the promises of economic opportunity made at the end of apartheid remain unfulfilled but believe the main culprit is government, not immigrants. – Photo: Rajesh Jantilal, AFP

South African shack dwellers condemn xenophobia: ‘Our African brothers and sisters are being openly attacked’

April 19, 2015

For some time now we have been working very closely with the Congolese Solidarity Campaign. We have been working to build a politic from below that accepts each person as a person and each comrade as a comrade without regard to where they were born or what language they speak. In this struggle we have faced constant attack from the state, the ruling party and others.

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Filed Under: News and Views
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Aunti Francis of the Aunti Francis Self-Help Hunger Program and Love Mission marches against displacement on Martin Luther King Day in Oakland. – Photo: PNN

California: For rich people only?

April 13, 2015

Thousands of families, elders and babies across the state are under attack by the concerted forces of gentrification and removal by the white-supremacist nation that would like to remove us all. From police terror to the acts of elder and child abuse caused by eviction to the endless building of prisons and militarizing of these colonizer created borders leaves us all asking who is this shiny state being built for?

University of Quebec Professor Emmanuel Hakizimana, a member of the Rwandan National Congress, is among those threatened in Montreal.

Rwanda: Critics ask Canada to protect them from Kagame’s assassins

April 2, 2015

Rwandan exiles in Canada and their Canadian allies, all of whom are well-known critics of Rwandan President Paul Kagame, held a press conference earlier this week in Montreal to call on Canadian authorities to protect them from attacks by Rwandan government agents. The dissidents said they’d been warned by allies within the Rwandan government that so-called diplomats assigned to Rwanda’s embassy in Canada were actually there to intimidate or assassinate dissidents.

In the 60 Minutes story “The Ebola Hot Zone,” broadcast Nov. 9, 2014, Lara Logan watches as American virologist Joseph Fair instructs Liberian gravediggers at a graveyard adjacent to an Ebola treatment unit. No African voice is heard in the 15-minute segment except that of the African American doctor who heads the clinic and speaks a few words. – Photo: 60 Minutes screenshot

How does Africa get reported? A letter of concern to 60 Minutes

March 25, 2015

The following open letter was sent by email to CBS 60 Minutes Executive Producer Jeff Fager: We, the undersigned, are writing to express our grave concern about the frequent and recurring misrepresentation of the African continent by 60 Minutes. In a series of recent segments from the continent, 60 Minutes has managed, quite extraordinarily, to render people of Black African ancestry voiceless and all but invisible.

The local children wanted their picture taken with the four young Chicago bucket drummers – here they’ve been loaned African drums – on the beach in Senegal.

‘Drum Beat Journey’: an interview wit’ organizer and filmmaker Elilta Tewelde

March 3, 2015

Ever since I have known Elita Tewelde, she has been a Pan African organizer in one way, shape or form, teaching Africans born in the Americas about our brothas and sistas from the continent, and vice versa. She recently took a group of young Black male bucket drummers from the hood to Senegal, West Africa. She filmed the whole experience and is fundraising to get the documentary, “Drum Beat Journey,” made.

From West Oakland to South Africa

January 31, 2015

Khayrishi Wiginton, a youth leadership coordinator at McClymonds High School in West Oakland, is fundraising and organizing a trip to South Africa with her students. Many of us do not know the power that travelling outside of the country has on fertile minds. I hope that Block Report Radio listeners and SF Bay View readers will assist these inner-city students and adults in completing their quest. Here is Khayrishi in her own words.

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Congolese mining researcher Dr. Jean Didier Losango, shown here with David van Wyk at a mining conference, spoke to KPFA via Skype from Johannesburg, South Africa.

Stop killing Congolese people

January 6, 2015

The First Congo War began in 1996, the second in 1998. The second war drew in all nine countries bordering the DRC, left millions dead, displaced millions more, and ignited conflicts that continue in the country’s mineral rich east, despite the peace treaty signed in 2003. Competition for Congolese resources can’t be stopped, but the massacre of Congolese people can and must, says Dr. Jean Didier Losango.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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