Wednesday, January 19, 2022
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Culture Currents

Cultural happenings in SF and beyond.

Earthquake at the Fillmore Heritage Center

There was a whole lot of shaking going on Saturday, Feb. 16. The Fillmore Heritage Center Equity Partners are causing the ground to shake with the ongoing success of the events they are giving. This last event shook the entire Bay Area with the soulful sounds of Tony! Toni! Tone! during two packed shows.

Wanda’s Picks for September 2013

On the 20th anniversary of the demise of my father, Fred Ali Batin Sr., the 18th anniversary of the Maafa Commemoration San Francisco Bay Area – the Ritual Sunday is Oct. 13, 2013; see http://maafasfbayarea.com/ – and approximately the 60th day of the hunger strike to end the inhuman conditions in California’s Security Housing Units or SHUs, I just want to pause and reflect.

‘Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp’ documentary at SFBFF

The literary work of Robert Beck, aka Iceberg Slim, has captivated the imaginations of ghetto-dwellers for decades. Much different from the writings of Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison and Richard Wright, who all hold up a piece of the American pantheon of legendary Black writers, the work of Iceberg Slim was a chronicle into what was going on in the underbelly of capitalism, America’s ghettos.

John P. Kee throws a huge 70th birthday celebration for gospel music legend Rance...

John P. Kee really knows how to throw a party. Recently, the legendary recording artist threw a concert celebrating the 70th birthday of his mentor and gospel icon, Bishop Rance Allen. Kee hosted Jason Nelson, Yolanda DeBerry, Isaiah Templeton, Shawn Bigby and Zeeksong for a spirited and packed-out concert at his New Life Fellowship Church in Charlotte, N.C. Those artists who couldn’t appear in person sent greetings via Instagram. A Korean soul music quartet, Korean Seoul, serenaded Bishop Allen with an a cappella rendition of the Rance Allen Group’s signature tune, “Something About the Name Jesus.”

Rebecca Brando speaks about new doc on her dad, ‘Listen to Me Marlon’

Rebecca Brando, one of the 10 children of American cinema legend Marlon Brando, talks about the new documentary on his life, “Listen to Me Marlon,” the way that Brando revolutionized acting, his human rights work in solidarity with the Black Panthers, Martin Luther King Jr. and Native peoples and more. “Listen to Me Marlon” opens on Friday, Aug. 7, in San Francisco and Berkeley.

‘I like to move it, move it!” How dance and other rhythmic movement can...

“The only way to move from these super-high anxiety states to calmer, more cognitive states, is rhythm,” he concludes. "This needs to happen before children see a therapist, because otherwise they may be too fearful and distraught to participate."

Don’t miss ‘Picture Bayview Hunters Point’ at Bayview Opera House Thursday-Sunday, Oct. 18-21; it’s...

Bayview Hunters Point is the soul of San Francisco. It’s changing but its history and heroes can’t be erased and must be celebrated. They are the foundation and inspiration for the thriving community we will rebuild. In “Picture Bayview Hunters Point,” a labor of love, says director Joanna Haigood, Zaccho Dance Theatre, a BVHP-based cultural treasure, performs that history and presents those heroes unforgettably. Bring everyone, especially the children and young people, to this lavish but free performance – inside and outside the Opera House.

In honor of beloved elder Melvin Dickson, 1940-2018, publisher of The Commemorator

Melvin Dickson made the transition to join his ancestors on Oct. 25, 2018, in Berkeley, California. He was 77 years old. Melvin was a long-time and dedicated member of the Black Panther Party, which shaped his thinking and commitment to the interests of all people for the rest of his life. As we honor Melvin’s life and legacy, we hope that you will join us for this very special celebration: All Power to the People! Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, 2-6 p.m., at Met West High School.

A Black Mother’s Day adventure

"There is so much power in stillness. We live in a very fast paced world with Internet and everyone on their phones every five seconds and everyone’s attention span is crumbling. I think it is definitely easier to be busy, to be on the run from your life, to be out there in the wilderness fighting for your life than it is to be actually still and really connect to the people who made you. That’s much more challenging. So yeah."

Lil’ D and his new book ‘Weight’: an interview wit’ Concrete Jungle publisher Dennis...

Lil’ D aka Darryl Reed is one of the biggest hustlers ever born on the streets of Oakland. In Oakland, his name is right up there with other local legends like Ricky Henderson, Huey P. Newton, Felix Mitchell, Micky Moe, Mark Curry, Gary Payton, Hook Mitchell, Reggie Jackson, Tony Toni Tone, Too Short, Askari X and the likes.

Otis Redding and Muhammad Speaks

Dec. 10, 2017, was the 50th anniversary of Redding’s transition. Jay Z and Kanye West introduced the hip-hop generation to Redding in 2011 when they recorded the track, “Otis.” Forty-four years before that, Redding was on top – known as the most popular male vocalist on Planet Earth. Redding was so popular in England that he ended Elvis Presley’s eight-year reign as the “world’s best male vocalist” on Melody Maker’s annual pop poll in 1967. According to Amiri Baraka, Redding said things in Muhammad Speaks “more ‘radical,’ Blacker, than many of the new musicians.”

Poor, disabled, criminalized poverty skolaz create a book about their lives, solutions and theory...

Poverty skolaz’ schools are everywhere. Our teachings are essential, haphazard and immediate, fluid and static. Our research is based on our lives and our experience, our solutions, our vast knowledge of what works and what can work.

WELCOME (to the United Front Against Fascism)

Welcome! Welcome – canoe, slave ship, raft, riverboat, barge, banana boat, tug – WELCOME: to the boat we’re All in –

Family justice in an unjust world: A mother’s story of false allegations by doctors,...

Stop snatching babies for federal funds – Families in Resistance is exposing trauma and corruption in the web that is child welfare, police, hospitals and federal legislation.

Introduction to ‘Colors: The Ancient African Connection to the Crips and Bloods’

With the recently released “Colors,” I’ve written a book that has potential to stem the tide of gang warfare between the Crips and Bloods and other street gangs identified by the colors red and blue. It’s a story linking present day Crips and Bloods with two ancient African warrior tribes called the Cuuzan and the Ikeely. These two African tribes worshiped the colors red and blue for religious and ritualistic reasons and believed they held supernatural powers.

Celebrate the life of Gabriel Powell

Gabriel Clyde Powell was born on May 14, 1978, at Saint Luke’s Hospital in San Francisco, California, to proud parents Edward Emile and Norean Marie Powell. He loved spending time with his family, laughing, and always wearing a smile on his face. He was a fun loving and caring person, devoted son, brother, father and friend, always thinking of others first. “To know him is to love him.” Gabriel departed this life on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019.

Meeting Johnny Otis

Johnny decided to teach a class on the history of Black Music in America. His concept for the class was revolutionary and drew large enrollments. It holds the record for the most popular class ever in the history of the Peralta Community College system.

Mumia Abu-Jamal’s eighth book: ‘Writing on the Wall’

Mumia Abu-Jamal’s eighth book written from prison cells in the state of Pennsylvania, USA, is a selection of 107 essays that date from January 1982 to October 2014. They cover practically the entire period of his incarceration as an internationally recognized political prisoner. Most of the pieces were written while he was on death row after being framed for the murder of police officer Daniel Faulkner on Dec. 9, 1981, in the city of Philadelphia.

Black disabled folks have been separated from the Black community since slavery

Slavery ended in the U.S. after the 13th Amendment was ratified on Dec. 6, 1865. However, disabled slaves were kept on plantations because slavery was connected to the ability to work. Jim Downs, among other scholars, wrote an essay entitled, “The Continuation of Slavery: The Experience of Disabled Slaves during Emancipation,” which explains that disabled slaves were seen as non-workers. Because they could not work, they were kept on plantations to be “taking care of.” But in reality, they continued to work for their “masters.”

‘Giving Me Life’ art exhibit debuts at AHS Highland Hospital for Donate Life Month

“I lost my brother about a year ago at Highland Hospital. He died unexpectedly after experiencing seizures that sent him into cardiac arrest. When I was first approached about donating his organs I was not interested, but as I sat in the hospital, I reflected on the fact that he was the kindest person I ever met. He would give you his last dollar without knowing where his next one was coming from. I joke that I hope the cruelest, corrupt person received my brother’s heart because there is no way they can continue to be unkind with a piece of Tony in their body.”
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