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National News & Views

National News & Views

From ‘movement moments’ to change, from the Red Summer to Black Lives Matter

It is said that Mark Twain once quipped that “history does not repeat itself, but it rhymes.” One cannot escape comparisons with 1968, and with widespread civil unrest, troops in the streets, warring abroad and a rabidly reactionary Republican president seeking re-election while executing his own Southern Strategy replete with dog-whistle appeals to “law and order,” such comparisons are not without merit.

We can’t breathe: On the lynching of George Floyd

n May 24, 2020, a crowd of onlookers witnessed the slow death by asphyxiation of a handcuffed Black man in Minneapolis. This was a public lynching.

Which side are you on, Mayor Breed?

The number of unhoused people dying on the street in San Francisco is triple the number who died last year at this time. During this pandemic Mayor Breed called for the shelter in place order ahead of other cities and even ahead of Gov. Newsom. She understood the deadly nature of the virus and her responsibility to protect the people of her city.

New Orleans sanitation ‘hoppers’ form union, strike for hazard pay, PPE, benefits

New Orleans – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. first marched with striking Memphis sanitation workers on March 28, 1968. They were demanding better working conditions and the respect and dignity due them. Their signs proclaimed, “I Am a Man.”

In defense of Black rebellion

Black people must rebel – and shine in the glory of rebellion.

Class war – not the media hokey pokey – is what it’s all about

Journalists aren’t supposed to “bury the lead.” But when death is the topic and corporate power is the culprit, the connection routinely goes unmentioned.

Learning from the Great Depression

According to Mark Twain (supposedly), history doesn’t repeat itself, but it frequently rhymes. He was right. Donald Trump, for example, rhymes with Mussolini. The decline of organized labor in recent decades rhymes with its decline in the 1920s. And the coming depression will rhyme, in many respects, with the Great Depression.

COVID-19, capitalism and socialism

The COVID-19 emergency underscores longstanding truths about capitalism and socialism. Acting on the most immediate demands that it raises draws us directly into a confrontation with core issues.

Congressmembers to governors, ‘Decarcerate now!’

We call on you to immediately use your executive clemency and emergency powers to grant release of adults aged 50 and older, medically vulnerable populations with underlying conditions such as HIV/AIDS, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease, pregnant individuals, juveniles, and individuals with less than one year left on their sentence, irrespective of the offense and who don’t pose a reasonable risk to public safety.

Rev. Jesse Jackson: Let prisoners go during COVID-19 pandemic

Across the globe, prisoners are among the most vulnerable to the coronavirus. Overcrowded facilities, shortages of food and medicine, and inadequate testing expose prisoners who are disproportionately poor and afflicted with prior conditions that render them vulnerable to the disease.

Pandemic shutdown separates parents from their children in the foster system

imagine being quarantined indefinitely as a foster child where you have no idea when you will see your parents next. As statewide shutdown orders sweep through the nation, child welfare agencies and juvenile courts are, by and large, treating foster children and system-impacted families with sheer indifference. Most COVID-19 juvenile court orders, if any exist at all, merely address court closures and give brief statements that parent-child visitation is suspended indefinitely.

The USS COVID-19, from Puget Sound to Guam

On April 9, the Kitsap Sun reported that Pentagon and Navy brass were in conflict about whether there’s a COVID-19 outbreak on the nuclear aircraft carrier USS Chester Nimitz docked at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington. I grew up in Bremerton, so much of this story is familiar to me, but like all COVID-19 stories, it’s changing fast.

Black doctor: ‘I’m COVID-19 positive’

“I’m COVID-19 positive. I’m doing well. I’m isolated in my house. I will be out of commission for two to three weeks. I have cared for several COVID-19 patients. One was not recognized initially and this may have been the one that the infection came from. Can’t wait to get back in the fight.”

Bernie Sanders calls for ‘boldest legislation in history’ to halt spiraling COVID-19 catastrophe

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Friday released his demands for six key priorities that he said must be included in the next round of federal economic relief for suffering Americans as the coronavirus pandemic cripples the country’s healthcare system and eviscerates the economy.

The 2020 Census, an opportunity to fight for equality and representation

Civil rights pioneers like Frederick Douglass knew their activism had to include advocacy efforts centered on participation in the Census. That’s the reason Douglass made sure to count himself and his entire family in the 1860 Census. This was a particularly bold act since Douglass was one of few free African Americans who were able to participate in the Census.

Got COVID-19? You’re on your own

Covering medical care costs isn’t part of the $2.2 trillion stimulus bill passed by the U.S. government. Politicians tell us testing for the virus, when it becomes widely available, will be free. If you get sick from COVID-19, you are on your own.

Pentagon orders all installations to stop reporting COVID-19 infections and deaths

The Pentagon has ordered all its commands, bases and personnel to stop reporting statistics on COVID-19 infections and deaths in the US military, citing “operational security concerns.”

Rush urges Bureau of Prisons to release elderly, nonviolent prisoners to mitigate coronavirus risk

Today, U.S. Rep. Bobby L. Rush, D-Illinois, sent a letter to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, calling on Director Michael Carvajal to release elderly, nonviolent prisoners in an attempt to mitigate any risk of infection to the prison population.

‘Virus or no virus, we can’t lose our voice’: Cheri Honkala on battling back...

We can’t sit on the sidelines waiting for someone to save us. We need to link arms and remember that all we have is each other, and we’d better get organized to take housing, to take land, to take back a future for ourselves and our children.

WATCH LIVE: Sanders makes statement about coronavirus and the economy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHwn0suWJ4U