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The changing tide: AIDS is a Black disease

The 2009 U.S. Conference on AIDS opened in San Francisco at the Hilton Hotel on Oct. 29. The three-day event drew leadership from around the country, highlighting the “changing tide” of leadership in the forefront of the battle against HIV. The lobby of the downtown Hilton was a sea of energy and vibrant color as African American, Latino, Asian Pacific Islander and women policymakers mingled in excited conversation.

Unexplained disappearance of 24-year-old has family puzzled

The family of a 24-year-old missing Black woman has made an appeal to federal law enforcement officials for help to bring her home safely and soon. Mitrice Richardson went missing after deputies at the Lost Hills Sheriff’s Station released her into a remote canyon area in the middle of the night, without her car, any money, a cell phone or other assistance.

Lebanon rebuilds, New Orleans still waits

In the U.S, the richest country in the world, Washington is coordinating the recovery effort. In Lebanon, a tiny poor and war-torn nation, Hezbollah, a grassroots resistance movement that Washington called “terrorist,” organizes most of the reconstruction. Hezbollah receives substantial aid in this effort from Syria and especially Iran, countries Washington also calls “terrorist.”

ACLU report says guidelines needed for police in schools

“When arresting kids for misbehaving becomes the primary mode of discipline, some of our most vulnerable populations end up being unnecessarily criminalized at very young ages before alternatives that could lead to academic success are exhausted,” said I. India Geronimo of the ACLU Racial Justice Program and co-author of the report.

Congresswoman Maxine Waters expresses ongoing concerns about New Orleans housing

More than four years after Hurricane Katrina, I am concerned about the availability and sufficiency of affordable housing in New Orleans, where rents have risen 52 percent since the storm and 41 percent of families pay more than 50 percent of their income in rent. More than 35,000 families recently applied for 3,500 Section 8 vouchers, indicating the overwhelming demand for affordable housing.

Get off Obama’s back … second thoughts from Michael Moore

Last night my wife asked me if I thought I was a little too hard on Obama in my letter yesterday congratulating him on his Nobel Prize. “No, I don’t think so,” I replied. I thought it was important to remind him he’s now conducting the two wars he’s inherited. “Yeah,” she said, “but to tell him, ‘Now earn it!’? Give the guy a break – this is a great day for him and for all of us.”

G 20 – or more G-money?

As the G20 gathers again, they assemble amidst the wreckage of their own creation. Representatives of 20 of the alleged developed economies, they are instead representatives of casino capitalism, the use, misuse and grand-theft of public wealth to fund the bonuses of financial pirates which have looted the treasury of billions.

Current economic recovery is crushing Black America

As bad as the last recession has been for Blacks in America, recovery might be worse. In the absence of federal policy interventions and without an effective “trickle-up” stimulus plan, Blacks will not only have lost ground during this recession, they will also continue to lose ground during and after the recovery.

Gulf Coast Civic Works Campaign applauds extension of Recovery Office and creation of Long-Term...

The Gulf Coast Civic Works Campaign welcomes President Barack Obama’s decision to create a federal working group to examine our nation’s long-term recovery policies in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and to extend the mandate of the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Gulf Coast Recovery.

Tasering: The new terror in our schools

It seems that there’s a new, easy-way-out solution for security people having to deal with troubled kids who act out or cause disruptions in school: Taser them! That’s right. Zap them with electricity. Elementary and high schools across this great land of ours are hiring security guards equipped with the nasty little weapons that the manufacturers call “non-lethal.” In fact, over 4,000 law enforcement agencies now arm their security people with Tasers.

Breast cancer in men and women

A commercial message broadcast on national television last month by women’s breast cancer advocacy groups was assailed as outrageous, insensitive and an example of reverse sexism. It portrayed men in form fitting T-shirts and sexy tops with “tits” and “boobs.” Their message was clear if not “over the top.” If men had breasts, funding for breast cancer research and treatment in the U.S. would be a higher priority!

Katrina survivors’ struggle for justice

Four years after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, survivors living in Houston are still fighting to keep a roof over their heads. Three women spoke recently at a news conference at the Kensington Club II townhome apartments to expose the owner’s corruption and the squalid living conditions he allows.

CIA report: Israel will fall in 20 years

The CIA report predicts “an inexorable movement away from a two-state to a one-state solution as the most viable model based on democratic principles of full equality that sheds the looming specter of colonial apartheid while allowing for the return of the 1947-1948 and 1967 refugees. The latter being the precondition for sustainable peace in the region.”

Organizing lessons from Allen Parkway Village

When Lenwood E. Johnson, the son of Texas sharecroppers, moved into Houston’s Allen Parkway Village project housing, the Freedmen’s Town section of the city had yet to be designated historic and the village had yet to be saved. By the end of the 1990s, the village was preserved and Johnson had proved to be something of an unlikely hero here in Houston’s 4th Ward, historically one of the poorest sections of the city – but always ripe for redevelopment because of its proximity to the downtown.

Circles of sameness

So Van Jones, activist, joins the Barack Obama administration, as the green energy czar, a field he’s passionate about, to provide jobs in Black communities and conserve natural resources as part of a larger change in America’s addiction to oil. But, almost immediately, Jones comes under attack from forces in America that really don’t want change.

Chairman Fred Street Party 2009

This beautiful event is celebrated all over the world, but from my experience, can’t nobody do it like the Chi (Chicago). Due to the national nature of the SF Bay View, it is important for us to cover events and campaigns from around the world that can lend a hand to our education and understanding of the war that has been and is being waged against us.

A tale of two cities in Pittsburgh

As the G-20 summit prepares to descend upon Pittsburgh, the city has been thrust into the spotlight and is being highlighted for its “commitment to employing new and green technology to further economic recovery and development.” It has been and is being denoted as the city that got it right, where pollution has been eroded, the rivers cleaned and the jobs in industry thoroughly replaced.

Fight heats up over discriminatory housing laws in New Orleans area

Rebuilding efforts in St. Bernard Parish, a small community just outside New Orleans, have recently gotten a major boost. One nonprofit focused on rebuilding in the area has received the endorsement of CNN, Alice Walker the touring production of the play “The Color Purple” and even President Obama. But an alliance of Gulf Coast and national organizations are now raising questions about the cause these high profile names are supporting.

Section 8 funding crisis

An extra $100 million in federal funding for the nation‘s Section 8 Housing Voucher Program may not be enough to save tens of thousands from becoming homeless or cover the extreme funding shortfall beyond Oct. 1. Some Section 8 renters may soon be homeless because of massive funding shortfalls in the program.

First 5 California approves $81.4 million contribution to help restore Healthy Families Program’s viability

The First 5 California State Commission approved a contribution of up to $81.4 million to the Healthy Families Program today to cover health care costs for more than 200,000 infants and children at risk of losing coverage due to the state’s fiscal crisis. The funding, approved at a special commission meeting held earlier today, will be used to cover children ages 0-5 through June 2010.