Sunday, October 24, 2021
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Anti-Olympics movement targeted: Some 15 VISU Joint Intelligence Group visits in 48 hours

From the afternoon of June 3 until June 5, approximately 15 anti-Olympics activists were visited by Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit (VISU) Joint Intelligence Group officers. Surprise visits by plain-clothes officers included home visits, work place visits, persistent phone calls, and intimidation of family members and neighbors.

No evictions: Gulf Coast residents can keep their FEMA trailers

The move by FEMA to enforce the June 1 eviction date for Gulf Region residents who live in temporary trailers not only lacks basic compassion but is also a derogation of the government's responsibilities to uphold fundamental human rights.

Single payer health care: big breakthroughs, interview with Rep. John Conyers

Less than a month after 13 single payer advocates were arrested protesting the exclusion of single payer, it is at the table in both Houses, making progress while the multi-payer pro-insurance reform is faltering.

As hurricane season begins, pressure builds on Congress to pass Gulf Coast Civic Works...

HR 2269, which is co-sponsored by 16 Congress members and supported by 165 regional and national organizations, funds "green" resident-led recovery projects to help meet the overwhelming unmet needs of the individuals, families and communities devastated by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Activist protests lack of Blacks working on historic Hampton House project

The Hampton House Motel in Miami’s predominantly Black Brownsville section was one of the places where famous Black recording artists stayed during segregation after performing for all-white audiences on the beach. The performers were not allowed to stay in predominantly white hotels. Miami-Dade County is restoring and renovating Hampton House after it fell into disrepair over the years. But ironically, the construction work on the Black historic site does not include any Black contractors, subcontractors or laborers.

WBOK purchased by Danny Bakewell, champion of Black economic self-determination

WBOK has come back strong from the severe damage inflicted on its studio, offices, transmitter site and broadcast tower by the flooding in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Now broadcasting over a powerful signal, the station adopted a Black talk format - "Real Talk for Real Times" - on Nov. 1, 2007, after it was purchased and upgraded by Danny Bakewell Sr. on behalf of the Bakewell family.

Media as a weapon: New Orleans’ 2-Cent

"Malcolm X would love to make mixtapes, have those out on the streets. The same reasons they boycotted and had protests in that era are our reasons too. We're coming from that same mindset, but we're using new tools, trying to get our inheritance."

Min. Farrakhan rallies support for Rev. Pinkney

An all-white Berrien County jury had convicted Rev. Pinkney, the founder of Benton Harbor's Black Autonomy Network of Community Organizers (BANCO) and an associate pastor of Hopewell Baptist Church, in March 2007 on allegations of voter fraud. He won release from prison on bond in December 2008 only after the Michigan chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) took an interest in his case and helped with his defense.

War of words: Police invade the comments at SFBayView.com

Ever since the police murder of Lovelle Mixon, after he allegedly murdered four Oakland police officers in East Oakland on March 21, the SF Bay View newspaper website, sfbayview.com, hundreds of messages have been written in the comment sections at the end of the articles by people who are undercover cyber police and people with strong pro-police sentiments, with some coming right out and saying they are members of police departments.

Is Black radio in jeopardy?

Kathy Hughes, the owner of Radio One, which many in the Black community deem the Black Clear Channel, has issued a clarion call to Black people saying that Conyers' bill will kill Black radio. But the question remains: Is Black radio now in jeopardy or has true Black radio that is accountable to the community been dead for decades?

A Good Food Manifesto for America

As an African-American farmer, I am calling on the first African-American president of the United States to lead us quickly away from this deepening crisis. Demand, President Obama, that Congress and your own administration begin without delay the process of reforming our farm and food policies. Start now by correcting the omission in your economic stimulus and recovery act that prevented significant spending on creating new and sustainable jobs for the poor in our urban centers as well as rural farm communities.

Transforming philanthropy into revolutionary giving

During the first 200 years of the theft of indigenous people's land, destruction of resources and death of peoples and communities known as European colonization in the U.S., the missionary ideals and practices of Christian charity were replaced by the capitalist and patriarchal pattern of philanthropy.

Government goes on trial for Katrina flooding

Survivors of Hurricane Katrina are finally getting their day in court. In a trial lasting most of a month that went to the judge Thursday, May 14, in New Orleans, a group of residents is holding the Army Corps of Engineers responsible for the flooding that occurred in the wake of Katrina.

82-year-old Black farmer arrested, charged with making terrorist threats

Harry Young, an 82-year-old Black farmer from Owensboro, Kentucky, was arrested and released on $50,000 bond in connection with allegations of threatening U.S. Department of Agriculture employees - terroristic threatening. It all stems from a contested foreclosure and sale of his family farm in 2005.

Victory at hand: Help Chokwe Lumumba win City Council runoff May 19

Malcolm X Grassroots Movement (MXGM) co-founder Chokwe Lumumba, in his run for City Council in Jackson, Miss., led eight candidates to win 43 percent of the vote. The runoff is May 19, Malcolm X' birthday, and your help is needed one more time.

Chokwe Lumumba and Clarence Thomas: Facets of Struggle

Hear Chokwe Lumumba, revolutionary attorney for Tupac Shakur and former vice president of the Republic of New Afrika, discuss his city council campaign in Jackson, Mississippi, and Clarence Thomas, revolutionary leader of Longshore Union Local 10, discuss his recent trip to Cuba and the Workers Economic Recovery Campaign in this interview, which is sure to become a classic.

Damaged roots in the fight for public housing?

The fight for housing affordable to low-income families in the United States is a vortex – even unlike the work I did representing immigrants in the post-9/11 world. In my experience, fighting for public housing is more unpopular than fighting for non-citizens’ rights.

Will Obama sell Assata out?

Most Americans are not familiar with Assata Shakur. After all, she's not exactly the type of Black superhero that they parade around during Black History Month. This is the type ignorance that some legislators in New Jersey hope will allow them to extradite Shakur back to the U.S. under the cover of our darkness.

Birthday greeting to Mumia Abu-Jamal

It is an honor to honor you on your birthday. You who give so much, you who receive so little, deserve all the love and respect that we are capable of. The amount and the quality of the work you have produced would be an amazing feat for any human being.

‘Dr. King died for me’: the dreams of Mychal Bell of the Jena 6

My name is Mychal Bell and I was one of the Jena 6 that was charged with attempted murder down in Jena, Louisiana, in 2006.
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