Morongo Band of Mission Indians gives over 900 Thanksgiving turkeys to needy in San Francisco – 14,000 statewide

by Michael Fisher, Morongo Band of Mission Indians

San Francisco – Five San Francisco groups that help provide Thanksgiving dinners to the homeless and less fortunate received more than 900 free turkeys this week from the Morongo Band of Mission Indians near Palm Springs.

Gwendolyn Westbrook, chief executive officer of United Council of Human Services, and former Morongo Tribal Council Member Tom Linton with some of the 200 turkeys donated by the Southern California tribe to the organization. There will be plenty for everyone at Mother Brown’s Kitchen this Thanksgiving at 2111 Jennings St. in Hunters Point.
Gwendolyn Westbrook, chief executive officer of United Council of Human Services, and former Morongo Tribal Council Member Tom Linton with some of the 200 turkeys donated by the Southern California tribe to the organization. There will be plenty for everyone at Mother Brown’s Kitchen this Thanksgiving at 2111 Jennings St. in Hunters Point.

The turkeys will help feed nearly 14,000 people across San Francisco. Morongo donated the birds to Glide Memorial United Methodist Church, the United Council of Human Services, the San Francisco African American Chamber of Commerce, and the Chinatown Community Development Center.

“Year after year, we are extremely grateful to the Morongo Band of Mission Indians for their ongoing generosity and compassionate support of the Chinatown community,” said Rev. Norman Fong, executive director of Chinatown Community Development Center.

This is the 16th year Morongo has provided turkeys to San Francisco-based groups.

“We are excited to be partnering again with groups that provide a critical lifeline for families, senior citizens and others in need across San Francisco,” said Morongo Tribal Vice Chair Mary Ann Andreas. “Our tribe has a long tradition of helping others, even when we ourselves were struggling to survive. Giving is a part of who we are, and that will never change.”

“We are excited to be partnering again with groups that provide a critical lifeline for families, senior citizens and others in need across San Francisco,” said Morongo Tribal Vice Chair Mary Ann Andreas.

Statewide, Morongo donated another 13,000 turkeys this month to mark the 30th anniversary of the tribe’s Thanksgiving Outreach program. With this year’s donation, Morongo has given away more than 100,000 turkeys – enough to provide more than 1.5 million holiday meals – over the past three decades.

“Our tribe has a long tradition of helping others, even when we ourselves were struggling to survive. Giving is a part of who we are, and that will never change.”

Morongo Band of Mission Indians, a sovereign nation logo“It’s a tremendous blessing to be receiving hundreds of turkeys from Morongo once again this year,” said Gwendolyn Westbrook, chief executive officer of United Council of Human Services. “Morongo’s commitment to others is invaluable in helping us feed the hungry in our community every Thanksgiving.”

The groups will use the turkeys to prepare hot holiday meals, or will distribute the birds in food baskets to those in need.

“The Morongo Band of Mission Indians has once again provided the blessing of a hot Thanksgiving meal to those in the greatest need in our community,” said Dr. Caesar Churchwell, senior vice president of the San Francisco African American Chamber of Commerce. “We appreciate Morongo’s generosity, which truly embodies the spirit of Thanksgiving.”

Michael Fisher, spokesman for the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, can be reached at MFisher@OPRUSA.com.