×

Monday, April 19, 2021
Advertisement
Culture Currents

Culture Currents

Cultural happenings in SF and beyond.

Ode to George Floyd, a poverty skola in amerikkklan

Lisa “Tiny” Gray-Garcia expresses the deep connections in the love for comrades lost and the shameful reality of an intricately woven web of poverty, homelessness and mental illness, suffering and death, controlled and managed by murderous poLice, wite supremacy and gentriFUKing under krapitalsm.

Wanda’s Picks April 2021

Wanda Sabir presents a thoughtful journey considering the effects of the pandemic on our reality, and experiencing through memorial art, theatre, healing arts and poetry the beauty, trauma, wisdom, fight and survival of Black wom(b)en holding the possibilities of the future.

Solutions for Women: Empowering women through means, unity, sisterhood and solving problems

No woman is an island and eventually the life will serve up a brick wall challenge that another strong woman, having experienced and worked through a similar challenge, might be the opportunity for solution collaboration for empowerment. Solutions for Women honors the experience.

Free them all, ASAP!

Baba Jahahara never fails to offer up the beauty of humanity in community with his garden of loved ones transitioning, revolutions building, justice promising, freedom awaiting, movement posturing, humans imagining and congratulating outstanding achievements acknowledged. We feel the love.

Reclaiming Sacred Grounds: Black Lives Matter in memoriam

Reweaving the frayed fabric of the web of existence, the screening of “Reclaiming Sacred Grounds: In Memoriam Black Lives Matter,” followed by a panel discussion about reclaiming the land where Black people have been laid to rest, brings expanded possibilities to illuminating and reconnecting the past to the present and future in honor and dignity.

Celebrating the life of Lt. Sylvester Harris

The rich and loving life of Lt. Sylvester Harris journeys now to the heavenly realms, celebrated by all who have been touched by his good humanity.

Faceless but Seen

Tara Belchar opens a personal view of an increasingly familiar picture of the inhumanity of homelessness as ­brutal, most often imposed and more often ignored and dismissed as someone else’s problem. We created homelessness – the collateral damage of classist, racist capitalism. Our humanity is being tested by the challenge of taking responsibility for our creations.

Aiding the Bayview community during the COVID-19 crisis

Wealth and Disparities in the Black Community founder Phelicia Jones and Sistahs4JustUs have been, and will continue to be, a lifeline with focused effort to the community of Bayview Hunters Point providing crucial aid and necessities during the COVID-19 crises and beyond in dedicated humanity to care for those disproportionately left out.

A Black storyteller chronicles the history of slavery and freedom

The richness and wholeness of spoken and written stories from one who can share from the connected personal places brings expanded value and substance to our own realities in the receiving of such wealth. Our own Fred Jordan bestows such a gift with his personal and enthusiastically explored window through history.

Yolanda Jones: Celebrating a Black Queen and a BOSS!

Huge love, Herculean accomplishments and eternal light burning bright in the Bayview Hunters Point Community and beyond as beloved Black Queen Yolanda Jones transitions to the Ancestors spreading her human spirit and ‘We gonna do this!’ along her journey into the Universe. Rest in peace Yolanda Jones.

Earl Sanders, San Francisco’s first Black chief, dies

Transitioning to the Ancestors, San Francisco’s first Black Police Chief, civil rights and police accountability advocate, teacher, expert witness, family man and friend, Earl Sanders leaves a legacy of courage, respectability, accountability and authenticity – and deep convictions like “wrong is wrong” no matter who you are. Rest in Peace, Earl Sanders.

Diversity awards, online conventions, and authors incarcerated in the neo-slavery system

In humanity lies the delicious element of creativity and imagination and bestselling author, Sumiko Saulson, embodies the gifts of writing as do her comrades here, uplifted for their unique talents, including incarcerated writers behind the bars of the neo-slavery system.

Humanists – where are you?

As described by Jay Rene Shakur, the crucial element necessary to reclaim dignity and social well-being as human beings, is the heart of humanity, and humanism itself. Yet humanism today seems obscured, lost, hidden, withdrawn or morphed, leaving the front lines and leadership disadvantaged in the fight for our humanity.

Commemorating Women’s HERstory Month

With relentless focus on honor and respect for justice and healthy, satisfying lives for all people, Baba Jahahara Amen-Ra Alkebulan-Ma’at notes poignantly our devasting COVID-19 loss of life, the travesty of political prisoners, appreciation for the sis-stars’ leadership and contributions, the people’s work on H.R. 40 and S. 40 Reparations Proposals, and congratulates Queen Warrior Mama Akua Njeri and son Chairman Fred Hampton, Jr. for their work to save the Hampton Family House in Maywood, Ill, and more.

Wanda’s Picks March 2021

Through Black labor, Black love, Black life and Black presence, Wanda Sabir presents jewels for honoring, learning, enjoying and discovering, by enticing our exploration in this month of Women’s History Day, International Women’s History Month, the still unfolding of story of Malcom X and struggle for liberation and self-determination through writers like Walter Mosley, theater from Oakland Theater Project, a cross-country experience with the Diamano Coura West African Dance Company and more.

Chronicler of Black life Rochelle Metcalfe: ‘I Heard That!’

Cousin Mell Monroe lovingly remembers San Francisco’s beloved icon in red, Rochelle Metcalfe, who left no stone unturned in her vibrant exploration, discovery and fully lived life. Rochelle Metcalfe’s loving legacy stands as an iconic pillar in San Francisco’s herstory. Rest In Peace and Power, Rochelle Metcalfe.

When the world lost Stephon

There’s a ‘tude’ that often comes with cops “responding” to a neighborhood complaint like vandalism or whatever, that reads, ‘there’s one, take him, game over, next? . . .’ – another Black man dead. Another father, husband, brother, son, uncle murdered. Cell phone looked like a gun, uh huh – makes sense since guns and cell phones are pretty much interchangeable with police, DAs and police unions. Another day . . . of pain and suffering for our communities. Stephon Clark – “He didn’t have to die.”

W.E.B. Du Bois: Unsung history of Black leadership in the Civil War era

W.E.B. Du Bois’ book ,“Black Reconstruction in America”, reviewed by Monica Hill, tells the historical truths, which were warped and twisted from the beginning when told by the white settler and taught in the schools as part of the strategic plan to solidify the permanence of slavery on which to build the capitalist imperial regime.

Joyce Gordon and her gallery

Downtown Oakland, Calif. – Managing Editor Nube Brown speaks with renowned gallerist and arts and community advocate Joyce Gordon on growing up in Berkeley, how she got Joyce Gordon Gallery started, the importance of the youth and the future of her art space.

Dr. Caesar Churchwell, a leader who made a difference

Dr. Caesar Churchwell now transitioning to the Ancestors, leaves his legacy of love and service to the people of his community, and like the pebble dropped into the water, ripples far, touching those he never knew.