by Tanasia Kenney

At a rally outside the Wilshire Federal Building in Los Angeles on Saturday, June 23, Congresswoman Maxine Waters told the crowd: “Let’s make sure we show up wherever we have to show up. And if you see anybody from that Cabinet in a restaurant, in a department store, at a gasoline station, you get out and you create a crowd. And you push back on them. And you tell them they’re not welcome anymore, anywhere. We’ve got to get the children connected to their parents. We don’t know what damage has been done to these children. All that we know is they’re in cages. They’re in prisons. They’re in jails. I don’t care what they call it, that’s where they are and, Mr. President, we will see you every day, every hour of the day, everywhere that we are to let you know you cannot get away with this.” – Screenshot: cavalierseul

CNN commentator Angela Rye didn’t mince words Tuesday, June 27, when she criticized Democratic bigwigs Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer for their rebuke of recent comments from fellow Democratic lawmaker Maxine Waters.

Rye, a former Congressional Black Caucus adviser, bumped heads with Trump official Steve Cortes during what began as a discussion on House Speaker Paul Ryan’s call for Waters to apologize for her statements encouraging people to harass members of President Donald Trump’s administration. The Congresswoman’s comments not only angered Republicans but sparked criticism from some Democrats, too.

CNN commentator Angela Rye didn’t mince words Tuesday, June 27, when she criticized Democratic bigwigs Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer for their rebuke of recent comments from fellow Democratic lawmaker Maxine Waters.

Rye was quick to point out the hypocrisy of the situation, arguing that Waters was being held to a higher standard than other politicians – including the president, who routinely called for violence against protesters who showed up to his campaign rallies.

“My point is very simple: I demand that people stop requiring Congresswoman Waters to behave in one way while everybody else can do something else,” she said, adding that the lawmaker’s comments were “taken out of context.”

Though Waters never called for harm, her remarks drew a reprimand from House Minority Leader Pelosi (D-Calif.), who urged “civility” in the resistance against President Trump and his controversial policies.


Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Majority Leader of the House, also wagged his finger at the longtime California lawmaker and called her comments as “un-American.” The public criticisms, particularly those coming from Democrats, did not sit well with Rye, who accused white Dems of being racially biased.

“The fact that [Senate Minority Leader] Chuck Schumer called what a Black woman said un-American is problematic and this is the reason why Democrats have a hard time uniting the base,” she said. “(A)nd Nancy Pelosi said, let’s ‘make America beautiful again.’ Whose America is she talking about?”

Host Erin Burnett challenged the notion, however, asking if Pelosi and Schumer were barred from criticizing Waters just because she’s Black.

“It has everything to do with the fact that this Black woman is intimidating to some people who can’t handle the truth,” Rye shot back. “It has everything to do with race.”

Tanasia Kenney writes for Atlanta Black Star, where this story first appeared. She can be reached at @atlantablackstar.com.

1 COMMENT

  1. Rye, a previous Congressional Black Caucus counsel, knock heads with Trump official Steve Cortes amid what started as a talk on House Speaker Paul Ryan's call for Waters to apologize for her announcements urging individuals to disturb individuals from President Donald Trump's https://edubirdie.com/expository-essay-writing-se… organization. The Congresswoman's remarks rankled Republicans as well as started feedback from a few Democrats, as well.

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