Join us Wednesday, Nov. 21, 1-3 p.m., at the Bayview Linda Brooks-Burton Branch Library meeting room, 5075 Third St.

by Amani Sawari

When I saw that the San Francisco Bay View newspaper was looking for a new editor, my first response was to feel a little envy for the person who would have the privilege to step into the role, never dreaming it might be me. I’d been content with being a student and managing my website while earning my living doing hair, which enabled me to be as active in human rights organizing work as my heart desired. It wasn’t until the National Prison Strike drew me into the spokesperson position that I’d developed a craving to do more.

In the midst of the strike when I was offered the position as editor of the Bay View newspaper, I couldn’t help but think it was meant to be. While I loved being a writer, a poet and an activist; more than anything I’d become thrilled by the opportunity to connect with the passionate people who make up the paper’s community. In Seattle I was starving for a community that embraced abolition.

On my first visit to San Francisco and Bayview Hunters Point last month, I spent the majority of the short time meeting with individual writers and organizers while also trying to fit in exploring what I could of the city.

Now that plans have solidified and funding sources are in motion during this visit, I’d like to highjack a portion of the holiday break to give our community the opportunity to share space, celebrate our work and collaborate on drafting future goals for the paper. It’s been a long time and we are in need of a reason to come together – which I’m more than happy to provide. I’m excited to call us all together to discuss our collective vision for the Bay View newspaper at the Vision for the Bay View Meet & Greet.

The editor’s chair is pretty comfy, but the comfort of a leather chair is incomparable to the comfort of being surrounded by passionate and caring members of a supportive community.

I look forward to meeting everyone who has been involved with the paper over the decades. I want to hear stories from people on all ends of the paper’s spectrum of influence from those who’ve assisted with operations, to those who’ve written or read stories from behind bars.

I look forward to meeting everyone who has been involved with the paper over the decades. I want to hear stories from people on all ends of the paper’s spectrum of influence from those who’ve assisted with operations, to those who’ve written or read stories from behind bars.

I want to get to know everyone who has been influenced by or is involved with the paper: people who’ve helped with keeping this community going and who have ideas about how to keep the Bay View serving the nation more effectively. I’m eager to hear about how the paper has impacted not only the lives of individuals but also the state and the region in its unwavering stance for justice, unapologetic for its “radical” views against all forms of oppression and dehumanization. I’m thrilled to be a part of bringing together the passionate people who keep the paper pushing forward.

We do not often all come together to discuss our ideas concerning the paper, but as we enter this period of editorial transition, I’d like that to change. It’s essential that we convene to revive the spirit of the paper by discussing potential plans and future goals.

We gather about those aspects of life that we value, we assemble to educate in schools, to celebrate weddings and graduations, but isn’t this 42-year standing newspaper worth all that and more? In the spirit of educating and informing those with few other access points to the outside world, the services that the paper provides as a connector, mediator, teacher, influencer, advocate and overall powerhouse for the underrepresented in humanity, I look forward to celebrating and connecting with all who find themselves on the Bay View’s spectrum of influence.

In the spirit of educating and informing those with few other access points to the outside world, the services that the paper provides as a connector, mediator, teacher, influencer, advocate and overall powerhouse for the underrepresented in humanity, I look forward to celebrating and connecting with all who find themselves on the Bay View’s spectrum of influence.

I’m eager to introduce some amazing changes coming on the horizon including revamping the website and hiring multiple paid staff positions.

It’s my goal that everyone involved with the paper has the opportunity to lay their ideas out so that they can be incorporated into a collective vision for the San Francisco Bay View. This paper cannot be all that it needs to be without everyone’s contribution.

Like a treasure being carried across a colony of ants, the paper is a treasure requiring the attention of everyone along its pathway. I’m pleading with you to send me your love and care as we make this transition along this new pathway.

As a young Black woman, entering this exciting role as the editor of this legacy paper, my hope is to be surrounded by the support of a community that is just as present as they are passionate. The Bay View needs your passion and I need your presence – so next week please join us for refreshments and dialogue.

With the hope of including as many of us in the conversation as possible, I’ve set up the event on Wednesday, Nov. 21, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the Bayview Linda Brooks-Burton Branch Library meeting room, 5075 Third St. That’s the day before Thanksgiving.

Hopefully the holiday break will enable our coming together during this crucial period in the paper’s history. Please spread the word far and wide and invite all those who’ve ever picked up the Bay View and felt inspired, restored, overjoyed or called to action because we are all required for the paper to thrive.

Contact Bay View editor Amani Sawari at amanisawari@gmail.com or 415-671-0789.

5 COMMENTS

  1. The San Francisco Bay View National Black Newspaper is an on the web and print paper, distributed in San Francisco, California. It covers occasions from an African-American point of view, with an emphasis on Black freedom and inclusion of worldwide racial disparity and political suppression.

Leave a Reply