World’s most corrupt judicial system

This statue of Lady Justice in Frankfort, Germany, shows her with scales in one hand and a sword in the other. She holds the sword below the scales to show that evidence weighed on its merit in a court of law comes before punishment.

by Demitri Brown

Why is the United States the number one jailer of all time? Because the U.S. judicial system is the most corrupt in world history! The founders are struggling to get out of their graves so they can put these tyrants in theirs. No system in the world incarcerates more people without constitutional authority than the United States.

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and Black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or Black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and Blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings and vilify them night after night on the evening news. 

“Did we know we were lying about drugs? Of course we did.” This is a direct quote from John Ehrlichman, President Nixon’s domestic policy adviser. This fraud has destroyed millions of lives.

Congress admits to the fraud in the congressional hearing on Over-Criminalization of Conduct/Over-Federalization of Criminal Law before the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, 111th Congress, First Session. Every person in prison should read this report. 

One of my favorite quotes from the report: “Honest citizens are at risk of falling into traps and being victimized and criminalized by poorly crafted legislation and over-zealous prosecutors.” This is politically correct language for “We have been falsely incarcerating innocent men and women.”

Timothy Demitri Brown

Former U.S. Attorney General Richard Thomburgh agreed: “Congress needs to rein in the continuing proliferation of criminal regulatory offenses. Regulatory agencies routinely promulgate rules that impose criminal penalties THAT ARE NOT ENACTED BY CONGRESS. One estimate is there are a staggering 300,000 criminal regulatory offenses created by agencies without congressional review.” 

The Food and Drug Administration has admitted that the Federal Drug Law is one such regulation. In plain language: “People charged with federal drug offenses are in federal prison illegally!”

Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas goes further: “[T]he federal government lacks a general police power.” He quotes the case of Champion v. Ames: “To hold the Congress has general police power would be to hold that it may accomplish objects not entrusted to the general government and to defeat the operation of the 10th Amendment declaring that the powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution … are reserved to the states respectively or to the people.” 

He continues: “Yet Congress’ continuous enactment of new federal crimes has systematically overturned this principle, securing a de facto federal police power under which virtually all criminal conduct can be federally regulated.” This is lawyer talk for: “We have been putting people in federal prison illegally and in violation of the Constitution.”

“The prison, the reformatory and the jail have achieved only a shocking record of failure. There is overwhelming evidence that these institutions create crime rather than prevent it!” 

What exactly is America’s problem? Racism, classism, courts and elected officials catering to the bribes of special interesst. It’s not like they don’t know what they are doing or whose lives they are destroying. More than 750,000 Black, Brown and poor white people suffer civil death in the judicial system annually. 

The National Advisory Commission on Criminal Justice Standards and Goals reported: “The prison, the reformatory and the jail have achieved only a shocking record of failure. There is overwhelming evidence that these institutions create crime rather than prevent it!” 

The Mexican Supreme Court is starting to come to their senses and trying to stop the U.S. from destroying their citizens. They declared drug prohibition violates the Mexican Constitution by interfering with the personal sphere, the right to dignity and the right to personal autonomy. 

When Portugal decriminalized cocaine and heroin, problem drug use went down. It also reduced the number of addicts spreading HIV and other diseases.

Our work is starting to turn heads and change hearts. Rolling Stone published this statement in an article by Tim Dickinson: “After 45 years, more than $1 trillion wasted, and the creation of the world’s largest prison system, America still lacks the political will to change its failed drug policy.” 

President Obama chimed in: “For too long we have viewed the problem of drug abuse through the lens of the criminal [injustice] system. We end up with people’s lives being shattered.” But Obama nor Attorneys General Holder nor Lynch ended the drug war fraud as we asked them to do in 2009, 2011 and 2015. 

The Global Commission on Drug Policy issued in its report: “The global war on drugs has failed, with devastating consequences for individuals and societies around the world. Urgent action is needed!” Their researchers found that increased law enforcement pressures on drug markets were strongly associated with increased homicide rates and other violent crimes – prohibition being the root problem.

With all this knowledge and information, why have the courts continued to participate in this fraud? Maybe because the 13th Amendment says you can condemn a person to slavery if you convict them of a crime. Maybe because selective prosecution allows you to eliminate your child’s competition in school and the workplace. 

Maybe because you can give government jobs to the imbeciles in your group who would otherwise sit on the porch all day drinking beer and collecting welfare checks. Maybe because you recognize it as a great disguise to hide your prejudice. Maybe because the Southern Confederates are still fighting the Civil War and are now in control of the judicial system. Disguise Oppression as Justice (DOJ).

The courts have always played this role. The Virginia Supreme Court ruled: “A person convicted of a felony lost all his personal rights and was considered civilly dead, a slave to the state.” The U.S. Supreme Court has never overruled its Dred Scott decision claiming Blacks had no rights and could not be citizens. 

Does anyone recognize what Lady Justice has in her other hand? A SWORD!

Now what? Since they have admitted these illegal acts, what should be done about it? Holler at me if you want my true feelings! 

Congress and the courts are promising a slow walk. Those that they feel are a threat to the SYSTEM got nothing coming. They will enact legislation that will give some of the victims relief, as you have seen with Johnson, Davis and the First Step Act, which they made discretionary. 

That’s illegal. A statute cannot be discretionary. The Equal Protection Clause requires that the law must apply equally to everyone similarly situated. Their fraud has been exposed, so now they are trying to pacify us with fake reform. 

You will start to see old issues previously denied now being granted. One issue all federal prisoners should include in any filing: “The Commerce Clause is not a grant of federal criminal jurisdiction.” The argument for such was laid out by Justice Thomas in his concurring opinion in Lopez v. U.S., 514 US 584(1995). All the major players – National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys, American Bar Association, The Cato Institute, The Heritage Foundation – are backing the move.

Our next moves

A. Present a private bill to Congress called The Drug War and Political Prisoner Justice Relief Act.

B. Petition the U.S. attorney general to make or amend rules for federal criminal jurisdiction to comply with proper federal jurisdiction under 18 USC 7.

C. Issues for the Supreme Court:

  1. The discretionary part of the First Step Act violates the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution.
  2. Simple robbery is not a federal offense.
  3. Gun possession is not a federal offense.
  4. Gun possession is not a crime of violence.
  5. Drug possession is not a crime of violence equivalent.
  6. Other offenses that do not cause actual physical harm are not crimes of violence.
  7. The Commerce Clause is not a grant of federal criminal jurisdiction.

We have retained expert witnesses to support our positions. Anyone who receives a hearing on either of these issues should contact us immediately. 

We reject tyranny, as it is a threat to the life and freedom of every human on this planet. Our mission is to shut down these new slave plantations. It takes the participation of all of us to raise our Nation!

In Struggle,

Demitri Brown

Send our brother some love and light: Timothy Demitri Brown, 10979-035, USP Pollock, P.O. Box 2099, Pollock La 71467. Demitri is the author of the book, “The Racial Race.”