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Tuesday, December 10, 2019
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Tags Struggle for human rights

Tag: struggle for human rights

Federal judge orders air conditioning installed in Texas prison in response...

In an amazing and quite shocking turn of events, federal Judge Keith P. Ellison from the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division, has ORDERED the Texas Department of Criminal Justice to install air conditioning at the Wallace Pack Unit, located in Navasota, Texas. The prison agency has 180 days to comply. Most of this ongoing struggle for human rights has been published right here in the San Francisco Bay View, but please allow me to refresh your memory.

Russell Maroon Shoatz: Rage, humiliation, testosterone, youth and the politics of...

Steve Bloom, a comrade and veteran activist, asked me several questions regarding my contribution to “Look for Me in the Whirlwind.” The questions delve into aspects of our political struggle against oppression back in the 1960s and ‘70s and are still pressing concerns. My story is closer to what untold numbers of highly motivated 1960s and 1970s “revolutionaries” usually don’t write about or discuss nowadays. I believe I have answered comrade Steve Bloom’s questions.

Maroon sues DOC and wins! Settlement reached in Shoatz v. Wetzel

July 11, 2016, Pittsburgh, Penn. – A settlement has been reached in the case of Shoatz v. Wetzel, which challenged the 22-year solitary confinement of Abolitionist Law Center client and political prisoner Russell Maroon Shoatz. This brings an end to litigation begun in 2013. In February 2014, following an international campaign on behalf of Shoatz, he was released from solitary confinement.

Historic settlement to end California’s indefinite solitary confinement finalized in court

On Tuesday, federal Judge Claudia Wilken approved the final agreement to end indefinite solitary confinement in California, calling it humane, innovative and fair. Prisoners celebrated the settlement agreement, whose terms were agreed on last September, claiming it as a victory that bolstered their struggle for human rights. Anne Weills pointed out that “what was missing from the courtroom were all the prisoners who risked their lives in the hunger strikes of 2011 and 2013.”

Do Black lives matter behind prison walls?

Does being convicted of a crime forfeit all your rights as a human being? Does being railroaded through a clearly unjust, unequal and racist judicial system forfeit your human rights? Guilty or not, I am still a person. I am a human being. We need people to understand that the struggle for human rights, the struggle to be free and not murdered by the state or its agents doesn’t stop at the prison gates.

The legacy lives on: Black Panther Party founding member Elbert ‘Big...

Some of the important rewards about being a former member of the Black Panther Party include opportunities to pass on our history and legacy to the next generations and to learn what young activists in other communities are accomplishing. This give and take of information is vital to continuing the struggle for human rights and against this oppressive “injustice” system which exists here and worldwide.

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City College’s disrespectful relationship with African American administrators and the Black...

“City College used me to develop relationships with the Black community,” says one administrator.

‘Harriet,’ the film – a review

If a viewer is looking to see a story where white people are not cast as saviors and Africans as beasts, then this is not the film for you.

Talking with kids about the dangers of e-cigarettes

Some e-cigarette users have had seizures after a few puffs or a day of vaping, according to an alert by the Food and Drug Administration.

Michael ‘Zaharibu’ Dorrough, universally loved, locked up for 32 years, is...

"I am incarcerated for a crime that I had nothing to do with. And I am serving a sentence of life without possible parole as a result."

Congo: Millions die while the UN keeps the peace

“There’s been killed 8 million people and you say you’re making fictitious peace and you’re telling us that this is peace when aggressors are not named!” – Congolese Swiss historian Bénédicte Kumbi Njoko