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Deportation of a labor movement leader

May 2, 2013

by Juan Ruiz

On April 18, Rumec was economically and morally destabilized with the deportation of Comrade Miguel Suarez to his native Mexico. With a successful construction business growing, assuming the leadership of the new labor movement and establishing a non-profit organization, Miguel Suarez was expelled from this country just moments before being exonerated of minor charges at traffic court in Santa Clara County.

Juan Ruiz, Malcolm Shabazz, Miguel Suarez
Juan Ruiz and Miguel Suarez stand on either side of Malcolm Shabazz, grandson of Malcolm X.
For over 10 years, Miguel has been at the forefront of the Mexican struggle, establishing strong bonds with the Black community and creating an environment for oppressed groups to establish business connections as well as maintaining a revolutionary agenda.

Upon his arrival in the U.S. at the age of 18 about 12 years ago, Miguel had ambitions of becoming an independent business owner. From a labor element of the construction industry, Comrade Miguel grew to become a business owner who employed friends, family members and local community individuals. His alternative form of doing business allowed for his growth to acquire resources that were once unclaimed by his community. His acquisition of the historical building Cine Mexico, a community theater, is a symbol of his constant growth as a successful business owner.

Rumec was economically and morally destabilized with the deportation of Comrade Miguel Suarez to his native Mexico.

Maintaining a business was not the ultimate goal for Comrade Miguel. His observation of the necessity of organizing and educating our labor force was the purpose he felt obligated to fulfill. Miguel took leadership of the new labor movement – assigning people various duties, organizing the community and orienting everyone to the oppressive circumstances we face. His representation of our people was driven from a sense of duty and obligation to a fair and just cause. Leading and educating our people was Miguel’s daily task.

Olmec king at Tres Zapotes archeological site, Veracruz, color
The Olmec “heads,” huge stone sculptures created earlier than 900 B.C. depicting kings with African features, demonstrate the presence of Africans in Central America long before Columbus “discovered” America. This one is in Veracruz, Mexico. The mixture of Black and Brown blood began long before Spanish conquistadores brought enslaved Africans to Mexico.
Liberating our oppressed labor force from corporate neo-liberalism was a passion that Miguel Suarez shared not only with Mexican groups, but also with the Black community. Being a believer of Black and Brown unity, Comrade Miguel educated us about the common African roots and heritage we share. Native to the land of the Olmecs and inspired by Yanga, Miguel promoted merging Brown and Black community business to liberate ourselves from economic slavery. Through music, art, public speaking and business ownership, Miguel had the passion to reach out and employ both oppressed groups.

Miguel took leadership of the new labor movement – assigning people various duties, organizing the community and orienting everyone to the oppressive circumstances we face.

With an insatiable appetite to educate and assist our people, Comrade Miguel was in the process of establishing a non-profit organization. By providing architectural forums in Spanish and English, informing workers of current construction codes and educating construction laborers on their rights in the industry, Comrade Miguel was providing a service to our community. This very same service, which our government is not providing for the people, is the basis of the non-profit in the construction industry. His idea was to prepare our people and arm them with knowledge to fight the ignorance and poverty that floods our streets.

Gaspar Yanga, the 16th century enslaved African prince who rebelled against the Spanish, with his people, called the Yangans, established Yanga in Veracruz, the first free town in the Americas, where this monument stands.
Yanga, a towering figure in Mexican history, is said to have been a member of the royal family of Gabon when he was stolen and carried to Mexico. After leading a rebellion, freeing himself and other Africans, he and his followers established a maroon colony near Veracruz around 1570. Many battles with Spanish troops ensued; finally Yanga’s terms were accepted in 1618, giving his people the right to their land and independence. This monument stands in Yanga in Veracruz, the first free town in the Americas.
The absence of Miguel Suarez in the movement has been felt by all his comrades. He was always creating an environment where people could meet and voice their opinion with the benefit of others in mind. He is the type of individual who reads people and can suggest how you may contribute to a common cause. His ideas ranged from educating our youth, developing independent business owners, establishing our own bank, financing the building of our own homes and establishing our own educational institutions.

Miguel Suarez was a threat to the system imposed on us. His vision went so far as changing the criminal mindset of people to a revolutionary business oriented way of thinking. This plan would ultimately fight the system that focuses on enslaving the mind of our men and women.

The absence of Miguel Suarez in the movement has been felt by all his comrades.

As a respected businessman, leader of a movement and father, Miguel Suarez will be missed in the community. The struggle will continue with his plan carried out by myself, Juan Ruiz, and comrades in the company. Now working with him internationally, Rumec will continue to carry on his legacy and educate our community on forming independent businesses. At the same time, we will fight ceaselessly to return Comrade Miguel Suarez to the community and family who need him.

Juan Ruiz of Rumec can be reached at rumec_buss@hotmail.com or (408) 380-9650.

 

14 thoughts on “Deportation of a labor movement leader

  1. 1Muur

    Good article being history has come full circle and everything is about to remerge back to what it once was before historical reconstruction as a common sense organic global society. There is nothing the now fictional elite can do to stop it. Believe me, there are thousands supporting this very movement in so many ways worldwide that the actions taken against this gentleman is going to be very short lived.

    Reply
    1. Reveau Lution

      keep the faith, brother. Destroy all those rotten whites in the US! Look what a ghetto they made of the land they stole from Mexico. Dispicable!

      Reply
  2. Elpi

    Excuse me, dudes, but this picture is not about Yanga, is about General Vicente Guerrero, who was too an afromexican and was an important support and leader of resistence against the spaniards and ca. 1830 was the 2nd president of the new born republic of mexico. You can to see Yanga´s image in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:EstatuaYanga.jp
    Guerrero was born in Tixtla, a town 100 kilometers inland from the port of Acapulco, in the Sierra Madre del Sur, Mexico; his parents were Pedro Guerrero, an African Mexican and, María de Guadalupe Saldaña an Indian. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicente_Guerrero

    Greetings and hold the combat,

    Reply
    1. Mary

      So sorry for the error — I do know better — and thanks very much for the correction, which I wish I’d seen sooner. A subscriber in prison also wrote to correct my mistake. The editor needs editors. — Mary Ratcliff, editor

      Reply
  3. Chris

    Suarez is a known drug trafficker and his deportation was the best current option for US authorities to get him out of the country, and thus make him less of a threat to the very communities this article says he was supporting. There is no doubt that he and his involvement in Narco-Trafficking played some part in the recent death of Malcom X's grandson in Mexico City last week. Wake up see what is going on around you. For far too many in the black and latino communities support and perpetuate the relevance of criminals in our neighborhoods. If the author of this article either knows what is going on and is complicit by masking it with this nonsense or they are blind and not doing their due diligence. Either way: FAIL.

    Reply
  4. 3rdEYE

    How do you think the drugs get here to U.S grounds from Mexico in large amounts? People working for the government, that's how. The drug trafficker is just a pawn. The plan was to lure Malcolm out there by the pawns for a bigger purposes with or without the pawns knowing. Sounds like a Suge knight (the pawn) and Tupac (the voice of truth) plan to me. But this time The pawns were fronting as Mexican revolutionaries to gain the trust,then try and find a weakness in Malcolm and capitalize on it the best way the could to get the job done. Maybe they really didn't know it would back fire on them. They probably are afraid because they thought they were getting away with it. But guess what? They didn't know that people were on to them from the gate.

    Reply
  5. Gus

    Miguel Suarez, deported guy who stupidly took Malcolm X grandson to a whore house in one of Mexico City's most dangerous places at three in the morning which resulted in Malcolm Shabazz'es death shall never be allowed to come back to the United States–not even to visit. Thank god ICE kicked that idiot from the US. I am not sure why some in the Hispanic community called Suarez a labor leader. What Suarez did was not only immature but also irresponsible and stupid, stupid, stupid. Shabazz would have been alive now if Suarez would have just taken Shabazz to safe areas.

    Reply
  6. Jazmine from San Diego, CA

    I find it sad how these people can blame my dear friend , Miguel for this incident. As we all know when the Lord calls you home, that’s just it. There is no cheating death. In my neighborhood people get murder for having on the wrong color. So for two grown men to go out & party , that’s normal. If you research the facts Mr. Shabazz had a past himself & him & Miguel were friends. I recall my first time meeting Mr. Suarez & it being a pure delight. I trusted him & actually fell in love with his drive. I will never let someone trash talk that man because I know him & his love for the people is genuine. He truly looked out for us, gave back to the community. I remember being with him everyday running arrands in San Jose for a theatre he had contracted. That man has a gift & you dont run into too many leaders now a days. I know he must be hurtin right now. My prayers & blessings go to his family.
    -Jazmine

    Reply
  7. Anony-mouse

    Comrade Miguel took Mr. Shabazz to a bar/whore house and got him beat to death in a scam robbery. The nature of those bars (scams for tourists) in mexico city is well known. Comrade Miguel not only failed to keep Mr. Shabazz safe, he likely set him up for the robbery in the first place. The men were separated at the bar/whorehouse and Comrade Miguel was NOT beaten by the thugs of the establishment he took them to.

    Comrade Miguel contributed to the death of Mr. Shabazz. What we won't know was did he do it on purpose or was recklessly negligent. Either way he is scumbag and this article needs a reality check.

    Reply
  8. Jose Marttin

    MIGUEL ON HIS OWN WORDS:
    (This is the only and last message from Miguel in my inbox in May 13th, my objective is you can read on his own words. I do not know why Miguel don´t write this directly in his Wall, perhaps he can´t. ..)

    “• May 13th jose Martin am Miguel i want to say thanks to look out for my defense against the ignorent comments that been arround in FB i know that if was mw that died people wont even notice other than my family and the people in my movement,i belive u deserve in explantion so you can help me figth the agressions tour our brown community, (see more: https://www.facebook.com/rumec.sanjose/posts/356580511131648 )

    Reply
  9. JOSE MARTIN

    MIGUEL ON HIS OWN WORDS:
    (This is the only and last message from Miguel in my inbox in May 13th, my objective is you can read on his own words. I do not know why Miguel don´t write this directly in his Wall, perhaps he can´t. ..)

    "• May 13th jose Martin am Miguel i want to say thanks to look out for my defense against the ignorent comments that been arround in FB i know that if was mw that died people wont even notice other than my family and the people in my movement,i belive u deserve in explantion so you can help me figth the agressions tour our brown community, (see more: https://www.facebook.com/rumec.sanjose/posts/3565… )

    Reply

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