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Cold disregard: Texas prison guards and University of Texas medical staff ignore excruciatingly painful spider bite

December 15, 2017

by Noah ‘Comrade Kado’ Coffin

South Texas is testament to the conditions and effects of a rapidly changing climate. Monstrous storms, unprecedented temperatures late into winter time – what has occurred as result of these conditions?

The bites of only two spiders can be fatal to people: the black widow and the brown recluse shown here. A brown recluse bite can be as serious as a snake bite. The National Institutes of Health recommend immediate medical attention. The combination of this spider and an uncaring, dysfunctional healthcare system can be deadly.

The number of birds and bugs now present here on Eastham Unit is astounding. Thousands of roosting birds leave an inch layer of excrement on the recreation cages’ concrete floor nightly. The cats enjoy the feast though.

The roach, ant and spider population has grown, which brings me to the topic of this exposé. Rarely is a spider bite fatal as it is reasonably treatable. Simple medications or minor cutting and probing by even a simple nurse could eliminate the problem, end the suffering.

I am now housed next to John Arce, 2090686, a 34-year-old man from San Antonio, Texas, with a four-year sentence. John has Hep C and food allergies as well as a head injury sustained during his arrest. John is a casualty of the American “war on drugs,” charged and convicted for possession of “K2” – the very substance recently sold legally to the people until addictions were formed, then illegalized to serve its purpose to fill this prison nation’s cells.

With the explosion of the bug and spider population, spider bites are not just a concern but a problem. The brown recluse is dreaded because of the horrible pain of the bite’s infection, but also the horrible scarring left behind. Such could be avoided by early treatment. I myself boast two scars.

John was bitten on the back of his head and as you could imagine was and is in such a state of pain that he stopped the nurse at every walkthrough and requested to be seen by the doctor. Nurse Utley simply dispassionately told John, “Nothing wrong with you.”

Rarely is a spider bite fatal as it is reasonably treatable. Simple medications or minor cutting and probing by even a simple nurse could eliminate the problem, end the suffering.

With hot shooting pain traveling down his neck and into his eye, John was in agony. Practically begging Lt. Ryan G. Thorp after two days of terrible, worsening pain, he was taken for an “emergency walk in.” The medical provider, Cecilia Okoye, looked at the swollen bite on John’s head behind his left ear, and told John: “Nothing is wrong. Go back to your cell. We’ll give you antibiotics.”

None were ordered and the pain became too much to bear. John went in shackles to the recreation’s outside cage with the intent to lie down and demand help – an action that would result in further loss of level, possible chemical agents being used and a team of armored guards forcefully removing him, but it would get him to medical.

Sgt. Jim C. Pittcock was present that day – four days after being bit, four days of pleading – and seeing the sincerity of John’s protest and the severity of the wound, Jim Pittcock took a direct action approach. With John’s consent, Sgt. Pittcock played the part of field medic and went to work.

About two minutes of excruciating pain, some “in the trenches” medical attention, and Pittcock had the sack of poison and spider eggs out of a hurting but instantly relieved John Arce’s head. With gratitude for compassionate and able Sgt. Pittcock, I stand to question yet again the actions – or lack of action – of the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB).

This human being suffered avoidable pain and was coldly disregarded, neglected and forced to endure a barbaric surgery without pain killer, clean or sterile conditions … for what? What is going on, people? This is neglect, it is cruelty and it is quite certainly illegal! Where is the oversight? Where is the humanity?

With gratitude for compassionate and able Sgt. Pittcock, I stand to question yet again the actions – or lack of action – of the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB).

Brothers and Sisters of the revolution, this is Comrade Kado bringing news from behind the wall. Your voice is the struggle and the fight for liberation. The fight for humanity is in your hands!

This human being suffered avoidable pain and was coldly disregarded, neglected and forced to endure a barbaric surgery without pain killer, clean or sterile conditions … for what? This is neglect, it is cruelty and it is quite certainly illegal! Where is the oversight? Where is the humanity?

I thank you all for your support, for contribution as well as your donation efforts to help the activists! We are not to be silenced! Those who struggle not against the bonds of conformity are but slaves to their master. Fight the power! Fight toxic prisons!

In love and rage,

Noah “Comrade Kado” Coffin

Send our brother some love and light: Noah “Comrade Kado” Coffin, 1795167, 2665 Prison Road #1, Lovelady, TX 75851, or via email: www.jpay.com to Noah Jack Coffin 1795167.

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