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'Non Kabila Rwandais' graffiti Kinshasa 0115 by Reuters

Congolese protest election delay: ‘Non Kabila Rwandais’

January 26, 2015

A widely feared and anticipated military attack by U.N. and Congolese troops on the FDLR has not materialized, despite U.N. Special Envoy Russ Feingold’s repeated urgings. Instead, this week, the people of the Democratic Republic of Congo rose up in the streets to demand that their Parliament not pass legislation allowing Congolese President Joseph Kabila to extend his stay in office beyond constitutional term limits. KPFA’s Ann Garrison has the story.

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In her classroom, Atim uses her old wheelbarrow so her new, custom made wheelchair will stay new longer. – Photo: Ronald Galiwango

Wheelchair mobility plus education equals a bright future for Eunice Atim of Uganda

January 25, 2015

Ronald Galiwango and Krip-Hop Nation teamed up in 2013 to write articles, published in the SF Bay View newspaper, about a single father raising two daughters with disabilities who needed wheelchairs to get around. The campaign turned into a two-year effort with two goals 1) wheelchairs and 2) education. Here is Ronald’s update on this successful campaign with pictures of Atim at school.

Victoire Ingabire

‘Friends of Victoire’ launched to free Rwandan political prisoner Victoire Ingabire

January 25, 2015

In January 2010, Rwandan opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza returned from The Netherlands to Rwanda to attempt to run against sitting President Paul Kagame. She said she knew that she would be either assassinated or imprisoned, and she is now entering the fifth year of a 15-year prison sentence. KPFA’s Ann Garrison spoke to Marie Lyse Numuhoza, the founder of Friends of Victoire, a new organization created to fight for her freedom.

Project WHAT! members participated in the Statewide Action Against Jail Expansion in Sacramento in December 2013.

Children of incarcerated parents say no to a new jail in San Francisco

January 24, 2015

San Francisco’s jail population is steadily decreasing, and we hope that the number of San Francisco youth struggling to find support during their parents’ and family members’ incarceration will decrease with it. This is why we as youth who have all experienced parental incarceration in San Francisco oppose a new jail in our city. Why invest in a new jail rather than the potential of our youth?

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Rooftop solar installation is one of the best opportunities to return the unemployed to the workforce, a top priority in poor communities of color. These trainees are installing panels on a clinic in Rwanda. If Africans can do it, so can African Americans. – Photo: Walt Ratterman, Sunepi

Our future and the solar mandate of Assembly Bill 327

January 22, 2015

The intent of AB 327 is to make the homes and businesses in California into productive and profitable “customer solar generators” by 2020, to help California reach the solar mandate of obtaining 33 percent of its energy from solar and renewables by 2020. Jobs will be created for all the electricians, carpenters and installers needed to build solar homes. These are jobs many young people can learn and do now.

The POOR family stands proudly surveying their hard work in 2012, the early days at Homefulness when the garden was the focus. No one had moved in yet, so they came as often as they could, busting up the concrete and asphalt to uncover the rich earth underneath that was soon producing delicious, nutritious edibles. The food was shared with folks in the neighborhood, who were soon participating in Community Newsroom, reporting on their lives and community. Homefulness is a very special place. Instead of anyone trying to destroy it, we should all be replicating it where we are. – Photo: Poor News Network

Shaking down the poor: The infiltration of a landless people’s movement

January 22, 2015

Homefulness is a poor people-led revolution that has taken root in Oakland. Homefulness can also be called humbleness. It is a sweat-equity model of housing that honors the land that was stolen from our ancestors. As history has shown us with poor people-led revolutions and movements of the past, there are those who will try to undermine a humble revolution. This manipulation is rooted in envy. It has no place in our humble revolution known as Homefulness. We will continue to live the revolution by any means necessary.

Following her introduction, Nicole Banks welcomes Mayor Ed Lee to the stage at the Wholesale Produce Market, one of countless new buildings in San Francisco.

Black men disrespected in Mayor Ed Lee’s State of the City address

January 21, 2015

What has changed for the better for the Black community in and around the city? Does the City of San Francisco care about this group of disenchanted people who helped build this great city? Though the mayor heralded The City’s low unemployment rate of 4.5 percent, many Black men hearing the word “jobs” in San Francisco know better than to get too excited.

Dr. Martin Luther King, 1962

Hajj Malcolm Shabazz: Malcolm and Martin came at the same enemy from different angles

January 20, 2015

Hajj Malcolm Shabazz, the grandson of El Hajj Malik Shabazz, known commonly as Malcolm X, interviewed on Martin Luther King Day 2012, is asked, “How do you see the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King?” Malcolm responds that when it comes to my grandfather’s methods and the methods of Martin Luther King, we can’t always all come at the enemy from the same direction, the same angle. Both are important. And we look beyond our differences to our common interests. And read Malcolm’s telegram to Martin.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Rwandan President Paul Kagame, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, DRC President Joseph Kabila meet to resolve conflict 112712

Congo’s problems are Museveni, Kagame and Kabila, not the FDLR

January 20, 2015

Potentially catastrophic military operations, authorized by the U.N. Security Council, may lie ahead soon for the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The U.N. Security Council has urged the Congolese army to join U.N. combat troops from South Africa, Tanzania and Malawi in hunting down the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda, a Rwandan refugee militia commonly known as the FDLR.

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Dr. King, 39, speaks at Mason Temple in Memphis on April 3, 1968, the day before his assassination.

Rep. Barbara Lee: We’re still living in ‘two Americas’

January 19, 2015

In 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Stanford University to deliver the first iteration of his speech, “The Other America.” Dr. King called attention to the disparate “two Americas” in which whites and Blacks lived – one filled with potential and prosperity and the other filled with “blasted hopes and shattered dreams.” When Dr. King gave this speech in 1967, the Civil Rights Movement was at a turning point.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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District 5 Supervisor London Breed, though still in her first term, was elected president of the board on Jan. 8, 2015.

New SF board president should fight for new Human Rights Commission

January 18, 2015

There is a new sheriff in town … I mean a new president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. She is Supervisor London Breed and I don’t need to tell anyone who knows of her that she is no shrinking violet. However, Blacks excited at the fact that a Black person will now guide this board is a trap that only sycophants can really enjoy. City Hall is still hostile to the San Francisco Black community.

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The Addition, formerly Yoshi’s SF, at 1330 Fillmore St., is an elegant – and expensive – venue. When the Fillmore district was known as Harlem of the West, San Francisco was largely segregated, but though many occupations were off limits, most Blacks were able to earn a living and support the many Black clubs and other businesses. Today, very few Blacks can afford many evenings at a venue like this.

Today the Fillmore went dark!

January 16, 2015

The Addition, formerly Yoshi’s, closed its doors, 77 people lost their jobs and many will wind up on unemployment. Gussie’s, the Black soul food restaurant diagonally across the street, left a couple of months ago. Rassellas Jazz Club up the street on Fillmore is gone. Will the Fillmore, once rivaled only by Harlem with its 31 restaurants and jazz clubs, die? The City did this! The question is: Did the City do enough to rectify its mistakes?

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Willie Mays chats with then San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein at the Giants’ 1986 home opener at Candlestick Park. With today’s Matier & Ross column, the Chronicle posted 61 historic photos of Candlestick. – Photo: Michael Maloney, SF Chronicle

Victory! Community pressure DID reverse the dangerous secret Lennar-City decision to implode Candlestick Stadium

January 16, 2015

“We have sought and received input from the community and our partner, the city,” acknowledged Lennar San Francisco President Kofi Bonner in a statement cited by columnists Matier & Ross in the Chronicle today. As a result, Bonner added, “Lennar intends to withdraw its request to implode the stadium.” The community’s next step is to demand a fair share of the demolition jobs. And since long experience tells us that unless Black contractors get the work, Black workers won’t be hired except in token numbers, calls to Kofi Bonner are in order: Call 415-995-1770.

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In the freezing New York cold on Jan. 12, 2015, Haitians protest in front of Bill Clinton’s Harlem office, saying “No to dictatorship, down with the U.N., down with the U.S. puppet Martelly government!” – Photo: Dahoud Andre

Five years later: Haitians step up their fight for independence and democracy

January 15, 2015

Five years ago, after the catastrophic Haiti earthquake, the international community – a self-defined “Core Group” under the leadership of former President Bill Clinton – took over Haiti recovery and reconstruction and announced they would “build Haiti back better.” But this was a euphemism for land grabbing, privatization, occupation and imperial plunder. Black lives don’t matter in the United States, much less in Haiti.

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An open letter to the technology industry: Honor the King Holiday ‘The time is always right to do what is right’

January 15, 2015

Today is Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday. After much blood, sweat and tears, it is a cherished national holiday when we honor Dr. Martin Luther King, his life of struggle and the legacy he left for our ongoing struggle for civil and human rights. Government offices, banks, schools and many businesses will close this coming Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. But most technology companies will not be observing Martin Luther King Day.

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As many as 2,000 people, mostly women, children and the elderly have been murdered in the past week in the area of Baga, northern Nigeria.

Thousands of Black lives mattered in Nigeria, but the world didn’t pay attention

January 15, 2015

From a bombed NAACP office in Colorado to the decimated town of Baga, Nigeria, acts of terrorism against Black people and institutions have failed to generate much attention in the United States this past week. Most of the Western world and its political leaders have, instead, turned their eyes to Paris, France – the location of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. While the world holds its arms out in sympathy for Charlie Hebdo, we who believe in freedom must seek justice for Black people around the world – including for the victims of Boko Haram. We must continue to say that all Black lives matter, even when the world refuses to see it.

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Dream Defenders, Black Lives Matter and Ferguson reps take historic trip to Palestine

January 14, 2015

Representatives at the forefront of the movements for Black lives and racial justice took a historic trip to Palestine in early January to connect with activists living under Israeli occupation. Black journalists, artists and organizers representing Ferguson, Black Lives Matter, Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) and more have joined the Dream Defenders for a 10-day trip to the occupied Palestinian Territories and Israel.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Governor’s proposed budget leaves California’s youngest children behind

January 13, 2015

We urge lawmakers to dedicate at least $500 million to increase access to child care for children in low-income families, especially infants and toddlers, with adequate reimbursement rates to enable parents to choose among high quality programs that nurture their children, cognitively stimulate them and ensure that they enter school ready to learn.

Congresswoman Barbara Lee

Barbara Lee on US war in Syria and Iraq: Congress ducks responsibility

January 13, 2015

Earlier this week, the U.S. Air Force website reported a record number of bombs assembled and dropped on ISIS during the past three months. Ammo troops, it said, meaning troops that build bombs in an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, are looking to break new records. Their senior commander said, “In the last three months we have already built over nine times the amount of munitions that the last rotation did in their entire six [months].”

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The San Francisco Board of Supervisors elevated first term Supervisor London Breed to its presidency on Jan. 8, voting 8-3, then 11-0 to make her the second Black woman after Doris Ward in 1990 to hold the seat. The board president is second only to the mayor as the most powerful person in San Francisco.

London Breed wins second most powerful seat in San Francisco, city of hope

January 11, 2015

“I sit up here today, reflecting on where I started, in a public housing unit right down the street, five of us living on $700 a month,” said London Breed in her Board of Supervisors presidential acceptance speech on Jan. 8. “I remember standing in line at church for donated food, and standing in line at the fire house for our Christmas toys. I remember seeing a friend shot dead when I was 12 years old. … But I had a grandmother who loved me. And early on I learned a lesson that San Francisco should carefully remember today: wealth is nothing without love.”

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