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Saturday, August 17, 2019
Tags President Manuel Zelaya

Tag: President Manuel Zelaya

Honduran movements in mobilization one month after brutal assassination of Berta...

In Honduras, one month since the assassination of Berta Caceres on the 3rd of March, tens of thousands of African and Indigenous Hondurans and those in solidarity have taken to the streets throughout the country with deep sadness and in resistance to the neo-colonial forces at fault for her murder. Impunity is rampant since the 2009 coup d’état, supported by then U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Dr. Luther Castillo, voice of the voiceless in Honduras, gets rousing...

“Doctor Luther! Doctor Luther, give it to the Honduras oligarchy hard!” Dr. Luther Castillo, who represents the National Resistance Front against the Military Coup in Honduras, brought to San Francisco the echoes of Cuba’s former President Fidel Castro on Thursday night at the Centro del Pueblo. He spoke for almost two hours with passion, conviction and a keen understanding of the savage rule of the minority oligarchic coup government in Honduras.

Haiti and Honduras: End military coups and occupations

The universal condemnation of the military coup in Honduras by Latin American governments is unprecedented. If this dictatorship is allowed to stay in power, no democratically elected government is safe. Just as President Obama promised a more respectful relationship between the U.S. and the rest of America – we are faced with another coup with U.S. military complicity.

The implications of the coup in Honduras on Afro-descendants

Currently, the country of Honduras in Central America is experiencing its worst political crisis in decades. In the aftermath of the military coup that forcibly removed President Manuel Zelaya Rosales, there have been various developments that have raised our concern about the security of citizens’rights and the impact of the situation on people of African descent.

Racist, white supremacist military rule in Honduras

The racist assault on United States President Barak Obama by the Honduran military coup government, installed on June 28, 2009, was greeted by the U.S. media with what John Pilger called “contrived silence, a censorship by omission.” (Amy Goodman, Democracy Now, 7/6/09) The poisonous racist attack on the first Black U.S. president was based on racist preconceptions and was carried out by interim Honduran Foreign Minister Enrique Ortez Colindres on June 29, the day after the democratically elected president Manuel Zelaya was arrested and sent into exile in his pajamas.

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New felony murder rule results in justice 16 years later

“The felony murder rule used to cast a wide net when pursuing convictions, without requiring prosecutors to look more closely at the evidence ... This man has been in prison for 16 years for being a passenger in a car.”

‘A Lifetime of Being Betty (Reid Soskin)’ CD release party Saturday,...

“A Lifetime of Being Betty,” to be released Aug. 17 at Freight and Salvage in Berkeley, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance, $24 at the door. Visit www.thefreight.org/event/1858290-little-village-foundation-berkeley/.

#HugosSoWhite: The literary convention diversity scandals

When there aren’t enough Black folks doing the writing, Black characters are written by white writers with all the inherent biases.

Hit me, Bruh! Thoughts on ‘The Last Black Man in San...

“Do you love it? You don’t get to hate San Francisco unless you love it.”

People’s Power stops a modern-day lynching

A massive phone protest by people from around the world and calls for direct protests forced the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections to back down from carrying out the state’s latest attempt to kill MOVE 9 member Delbert Orr Africa.