by Michael Zaharibu Dorrough

Hello Kendra,

I trust that you continue to be of sound health and spirit upon receiving this. You should have received a couple of my letters since March. It is possible that you may have heard from a couple of guys here whom I shared your April 14 letter with. You really do have the respect and support of us all.

I also had the opportunity to read a couple of published letters by Todd Ashker to you that was really inspiring. The families and loved ones of us all constitute a very powerful voice and matter tremendously in any change that is coming.

The families and loved ones of us all constitute a very powerful voice and matter tremendously in any change that is coming.

Todd is really correct in stating that we, the prisoner class, should no longer comply with anything that contributes in any way to the inhumanities that we are subjected to and within the context in which we are defined by the dominant class.

Our best to Todd and everyone should the opportunity present itself. Please know that you continue to inspire. Take good care.

Michael

Send our brother some love and light: Michael Zaharibu Dorrough, D-83611, Cor-SHU 4B-1L-53. This letter was written to Kendra Castaneda May 6, 2012, and postmarked May 8. Kendra is a prisoner human rights activist whose husband is currently incarcerated in the notorious Calipatria State Prison ASU (Administrative Segregation Unit). She can be reached at kendracastaneda55@gmail.com.

 

2 COMMENTS

  1. The reason why government agencies such as the DOC don't respond well to family inquiries it to deliberately frustrate them into a condition of hopelessness and ineffectiveness. The fact is, families can be an influential part of change if you can get them united with one voice and overcome this "divide and conquer" strategy the DOC has developed to minimize impact and by diverting issues to another level to avoid dealing with the reality of their blunderous ways in running prisons.

  2. Great article! I spent 10 years in California prisons on drug charges. Imagine during the 1960's when it was okay to experiment with drugs. If we had the same laws we do now with the drug war, half the current politicians we have now would be in prison. I wrote Underdog to show the public that tough on crime platforms only breed bigger criminals.

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