Rwandans protest Dutch support for Kagame dictatorship

French translation by Marceline Nduwamungu follows

by Ann Garrison

Rwandan Dutch citizens and political asylum seekers in the Netherlands demonstrated in The Hague, the country’s capital, on Saturday, Nov. 29. They called on the Dutch government to stop supporting the dictatorship of Paul Kagame and stop deporting Rwandans at Kagame’s request.

Hundreds of Rwandans marched in The Hague, capital of The Netherlands, on Nov. 29 to show their loving support for imprisoned opposition leader Victoire Ingabire, to oppose Paul Kagame’s dictatorship and to demand that the Netherlands stop deporting Rwandans at the dictator’s request. In the lead is Victoire’s daughter, Raissa Ujeneza. Her father, Lin Muyizere, delivered a major speech.
Hundreds of Rwandans marched in The Hague, capital of The Netherlands, on Nov. 29 to show their loving support for imprisoned opposition leader Victoire Ingabire, to oppose Paul Kagame’s dictatorship and to demand that the Netherlands stop deporting Rwandans at the dictator’s request. In the lead is Victoire’s daughter, Raissa Ujeneza. Her father, Lin Muyizere, delivered a major speech. Les rwandais ont marché par centaines dans les rues de La Haye aux Pays-Bas, le 27 novembre 2014, pour exprimer leur soutien à la prisonnière politique et leader de l’opposition rwandaise Mme Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, pour dénoncer la dictature de Paul Kagame et pour exiger que les Pays-Bas arrêtent tout soutien à la dictature de Paul Kagame et le rapatriement des rwandais vivant aux Pays-Bas à la demande de Kagame. Raissa Ujeneza, fille de Victoire, ouvre la marche. Son père, Lin Muyizere, a prononcé un important discours.

Many marchers held banner images of Rwandan political prisoner Victoire Ingabire. Others wore windbreakers of pink and orange, the colors worn by Rwandan prisoners, over heavy winter clothes. After watching the video of the demonstration, I spoke to Jean Flammé, a Belgian attorney for a Rwandan facing extradition for supporting Victoire Ingabire.

San Francisco Bay View/Ann Garrison: Jean Flammé, I know that the Rwandan government accuses those Rwandans facing extradition from the Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe of genocide crime after they’ve spoken out against the Rwandan government, so the threat of being charged with genocide crime by the Rwandan government basically serves as a gag order.

Could you say something about how your work as a defense attorney at the International Criminal Tribunal on Rwanda informs your work in defense of Rwandans facing extradition?

Jean Flammé: I defended a Rwandan facing extradition before a Dutch court in The Hague, and one thing I said was that there had not been a genocide. According to international law on genocide, as defined by the U.N. Convention on Genocide, there had not been a genocide, because the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) ruled again and again that there was no evidence of a plan or conspiracy to eliminate Rwandan Tutsis. Not a single defendant was convicted of “conspiracy to commit genocide” because there was no evidence of conspiracy.

I also explained that another reason why the Rwandan tragedy was more accurately described as mass killing, not genocide, was because the killing was not aimed at one single group, being the Tutsi, as is commonly accepted. Indeed, at least as many Hutu as Tutsi were massacred.

Bay View: But the U.N. Tribunal, the ICTR, just ignored the U.N.’s own definition of the crime of genocide, didn’t it? Didn’t it hand down convictions for “genocide,” even though a defining element of the crime – planning and “intent” – was never proven?

The Rwandan government accuses those Rwandans facing extradition from the Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe of genocide crime after they’ve spoken out against the Rwandan government, so the threat of being charged with genocide crime by the Rwandan government basically serves as a gag order.

Jean Flammé: The ICTR ruled that there had been a genocide without previous planning, which is theoretically possible if one establishes the intent to destroy a group, as defined by the U.N. Convention. But how could such a common intent exist on such a scale without planning, and the court ruled that planning had not occurred?

Bay View: So what happened when you told the judge that in the extradition case there had been no genocide, despite the ICTR rulings?

Jean Flammé: The judge just looked at me as if I were from another planet or something. “No genocide? What is he saying? It is a known fact that there has been a genocide.” And then it started to become very difficult, as it always does, because of course it has been indeed generally accepted not only by the press but also by the ICTR.

Although there are so many arguments to say no, there had not been a genocide; there had been a civil war, which would be totally different of course. The violence exploded because of the invasion of the country by the Rwandan Patriotic Front in October 1990, and the war it waged for the next three and a half years. Bernard Lugan explains this exactly in his book, and so does Professor Peter Erlinder.

Bay View: Well, it would be a qualified civil war because it began when troops invaded from Uganda with Ugandan weapons.

Flammé: And American weapons.

Bay View: Yes, and American weapons. Do you have an outcome for that extradition trial yet?

Flammé: Well, the judges have denied what we told them and approved the extradition, so now it’s before the high court, the Dutch Supreme Court.

Bay View: So you are defending this case in The Netherlands?

Flammé: Yes, the Dutch lawyers asked me to support them.

The case is Mugimba, Jean Baptiste Mugimba. He was supporting Victoire Ingabire. He had organized a group in Holland to support Ingabire’s attempt to be allowed to run for president in Rwanda in 2010 and then to free her from prison, where she has been since October 2010.

So I told the court, “Look, this man is in front of you because of what he did for Victoire Ingabire. And Holland should know what’s happening to that very brave woman. And this is the reason why they want him.”

And I even told them, “Look, the death penalty doesn’t exist in Holland anymore, but if you send this man to Rwanda, you send him to his death and it will be the death penalty.”

“Look, this man is in front of you because of what he did for Victoire Ingabire. And Holland should know what’s happening to that very brave woman. And this is the reason why they want him.”

Bay View: In Rwanda, they don’t have the death penalty legally, but bodies keep floating down the river into Burundi.

Flammé: That’s what I mean, yes. People disappear, and even get killed. Also in Belgium, there was a gentleman who died, who was found in the river with his arms cut off. His mutilated body was found in the river.

Bay View: Was this a Rwandan?

Flammé: Yes.

Bay View: And when did that happen?

Flammé: It happened in Brussels, about two, three years ago.

Bay View: Jean Flammé, thanks for speaking to the SF Bay View.

Flammé: My pleasure.

Oakland writer Ann Garrison contributes to the San Francisco Bay View, Counterpunch, Global Research, Colored Opinions, Black Agenda Report and Black Star News and produces radio news and features for Pacifica’s WBAI-NYC, KPFA-Berkeley and her own YouTube Channel. She can be reached at anniegarrison@gmail.com. If you want to see Ann Garrison’s independent reporting continue, please contribute on her website, anngarrison.com.

Les rwandais manifestent contre le soutien des Pays-Bas à la dictature de Kagame

par Ann Garrison

Les citoyens rwando-hollandais et les demandeurs d’asile aux Pays-Bas ont manifesté à La Haye, le jeudi 27 novembre 2014. Ils ont demandé au gouvernement néerlandais d’arrêter tout soutien à la dictature de Paul Kagame et le rapatriement de rwandais à la demande de Kagame.

Les manifestants portaient des banderoles à l’effigie de Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, prisonnière politique rwandaise. D’autres portaient des coupe-vent de couleur rose et orange, couleurs des habits des prisonniers rwandais, sur des tenues d’hiver. Après avoir visionné la vidéo de la manifestation, j’ai contacté Mr Jean Flammé, un avocat belge qui défend un rwandais en phase d’être rapatrié pour avoir soutenu Mme Victoire Ingabire.

San Francisco Bay View/Ann Garrison: Jean Flammé, je sais que le gouvernement rwandais accuse ces rwandais des Pays-Bas et d’ailleurs en Europe menacés d’extradition de crime de génocide dès qu’ils critiquent ouvertement le gouvernement rwandais, d’où la menace d’être taxé de génocidaire par le gouvernement rwandais qui sert en premier lieu comme un bâillon.

Pouvez-vous nous dire en quoi votre travail en tant qu’avocat de la défense au TPIR vous aide dans la défense des rwandais menacés de rapatriement ?

Jean Flammé : J’ai assisté un rwandais menacé d’extradition devant un tribunal néerlandais à La Haye, et une chose que j’ai dite est qu’il n’y avait pas eu de génocide. Selon la loi internationale sur le génocide, telle que définie par la Convention des Nations Unies sur le Génocide, il n’y a pas eu de génocide, parce que le Tribunal Pénal International sur le Rwanda (TPIR) a longuement délibéré sur l’existence d’un plan ou d’une entente pour éliminer les tutsi rwandais. Aucun prévenu n’a été condamné pour « entente de commettre un génocide » parce qu’il n’y avait pas de preuve de l’existence de ce plan.

J’ai aussi expliqué la raison pour laquelle je trouvais que la tragédie rwandaise pouvait être décrite comme des tueries de masse, mais pas un génocide, et que ces tueries n’ont pas visé un seul groupe, à savoir les tutsi, comme cela est communément admis. En effet, au moins autant de hutu que de tutsi ont été tués.

Bay View : mais le tribunal de l’ONU, le TPIR, a ignoré la définition que les Nations Unies elles-mêmes donnent au crime de génocide, n’est-ce pas ? N’a-t-il pas prononcé des condamnations pour « génocide » alors que deux éléments de la définition, à savoir la planification et l’intention – n’ont jamais été prouvés ?

Le gouvernement rwandais accuse ces rwandais des Pays-Bas et d’ailleurs en Europe menacés de rapatriement de crime de génocide dès qu’ils critiquent ouvertement le gouvernement rwandais, d’où la menace d’être taxé de génocidaire par le gouvernement rwandais qui sert en premier lieu comme un bâillon.

Jean Flammé: Le TPIR a admis qu’il y avait eu un génocide sans planification préalable, ce qui est théoriquement possible si l’intention de détruire un groupe est établie tel que défini par la Convention des Nations-Unies. Mais comment cette intention peut-elle exister à un tel degré sans planification, le tribunal ayant admis que la planification n’a pas eu lieu ?

Bay View: que s’est-il alors passé lorsque vous avez déclaré au juge qu’il n’y avait pas eu de génocide, malgré les conclusions du TPIR?

Jean Flammé : le juge m’a regardé comme si je venais d’une autre planète. « Pas de génocide ? que dit-il ? c’est un fait connu qu’il y a eu un génocide ». Puis les choses se sont compliquées comme d’habitude, parce qu’il y a une vérité généralement admise non seulement par la presse mais aussi par le TPIR.

Pourtant il existe assez d’arguments pour dire qu’il n’y a pas eu de génocide. Il y a eu une guerre civile, il y a eu explosion de violence due à l’invasion du pays par le Front Patriotique Rwandais (FPR) en octobre 1990 et la guerre qu’il a entretenue pendant trois ans et demi. Bernard Lugan explique tout ceci dans son livre, comme le fait aussi le Professeur Peter Erlinder.

Bay View : eh bien, elle serait une guerre civile bien qualifiée puisqu’elle a commencé lorsque des troupes ont envahi le Rwanda à partir de l’Uganda avec des armes ougandaises.

Flammé : et des armes américaines.

Bay View: oui, et des armes américaines. Avez-vous une décision du tribunal sur le procès d’extradition ?

Flammé : les juges n’ont pas accepté nos plaidoiries et ont approuvé l’extradition. Maintenant l’affaire est devant la Cour Suprême néerlandaise.

Bay View: Vous plaidez pour ce cas aux Pays-Bas donc ?

Flammé : oui, les avocats néerlandais m’ont demandé de les aider.

Il s’agit de l’affaire de Mugimba, Jean Baptiste Mugimba. Il soutient Victoire Ingabire. Il est à la base de l’organisation d’un groupe de soutien à Victoire Ingabire en vue de la présentation de cette dernière aux élections présidentielles de 2010 et qui demande sa libération depuis son emprisonnement en octobre 2010.

J’ai dit au tribunal : « cet homme est ici pour ce qu’il a fait pour Victoire Ingabire. Et les Pays-Bas sont au courant des conditions dans lesquelles cette brave dame est aujourd’hui. C’est pour cette raison que cet homme est recherché ».

Je leur ai même dit : « La peine de mort est abolie aux Pays-Bas, mais si vous renvoyez cet homme au Rwanda, vous l’envoyez à sa mort certaine, ce sera une peine de mort ».

« Cet homme est ici pour ce qu’il a fait pour Victoire Ingabire. Et les Pays-Bas sont au courant des conditions dans lesquelles cette brave dame est aujourd’hui. C’est pour cette raison que cet homme est recherché ».

Bay View: Au Rwanda, la peine de mort est abolie par la loi mais des corps continuent de flotter des rivières rwandaises vers le Burundi.

Flammé: C’est exactement ce que je voulais dire. Des personnes disparaissent, elles sont même tuées. Même en Belgique, il y a eu un homme qui est mort, il a été retrouvé dans le Canal, son corps mutilé.

Bay View: Etait-il rwandais?

Flammé: oui.

Bay View: Quand cela s’est-il passé?

Flammé: ça s’est passé à Bruxelles, il y a deux ou trois ans.

Bay View: Jean Flammé, merci d’avoir bien voulu vous entretenir avec SF Bay View.

Flammé: C’était avec plaisir.