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Saturday, August 24, 2019
Tags BLA

Tag: BLA

Russell Maroon Shoatz: Rage, humiliation, testosterone, youth and the politics of...

Steve Bloom, a comrade and veteran activist, asked me several questions regarding my contribution to “Look for Me in the Whirlwind.” The questions delve into aspects of our political struggle against oppression back in the 1960s and ‘70s and are still pressing concerns. My story is closer to what untold numbers of highly motivated 1960s and 1970s “revolutionaries” usually don’t write about or discuss nowadays. I believe I have answered comrade Steve Bloom’s questions.

Pattern of practice: Centuries of racist oppression culminating in mass incarceration

After winning their freedom in the bloodiest conflict in U.S. history, Blacks were in many cases and places denied basic human, civil and political rights, literally forcing New Afrikans back into slavery by denying them a right to life. Over the years the government declared and waged war on the New Afrikan communities - war on unemployed "vagrants,' war on crime, war on drugs, war on gangs - culminating in mass incarceration.

Our historical obligation: to pursue the total liberation of all oppressed...

We New Afrikans have a historical obligation to protect and serve the people by joining forces with ALL like-minded individuals, regardless of race, color, creed or gender. Our historical obligation in particular is rooted in the year 1619 via the Trans-Atlantic slave trade from which the Abolitionist Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Liberation Movement and the New Afrikan Independence Movement were spawned.

Social consciousness, prison struggle and perseverance: a personal account

There are hundreds of prisoners who have been falsely validated as members or associates of prison gangs that can viscerally relate to my experience, from living life as an outlaw in society to being prosecuted and convicted to prison, only to be persecuted while in prison, fundamentally for educating oneself by trying to heighten one’s sense of cultural and social awareness.

Assata Shakur is a freedom fighter, not a terrorist

The inclusion of Assata Shakur on the FBI’s 10 Most Wanted Terrorists list last month – marking 29 years since her liberation from a New Jersey maximum security prison in 1979 by members of the Black Liberation Army – while aimed at Cuba’s leadership should also be interpreted as a shot across the bow of any internal revolutionary movement or revolutionary activists in the United States.

Unity in organization

Prisoners of varying racial and ethnic backgrounds and ideological and political persuasions have forged a united front – best reflected by the Short Corridor Collective confined in Pelican Bay State Prison Security Housing Unit – around common goals and interests of ameliorating the tortuous concrete conditions inherent to long-term solitary confinement.

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Venezuela: An axis of hope, dignity and defiance stands up to...

We, the peoples of the Global South have the natural resources and power to humble the Empire. It is a well substantiated fact that if Europe and the US were denied access to our resources for two weeks, their economies would grind to a halt.

Rwanda’s Victoire Ingabire: I will not live in fear of prison...

I want the government to show us who killed all these members of the opposition in Rwanda and what happened to those who have disappeared.

Independent review of Public Defender Jeff Adachi’s autopsy shows death was...

“(N)othing in Jeff’s autopsy revealed any indication of chronic drug use or overdose. (The reports) provide peace of mind that we did know Jeff better than the circumstances of his death have suggested.” – Robert Chan, Adachi family attorney