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Monday, June 24, 2019
Tags Black shining prince

Tag: Black shining prince

‘The Diary of Malcolm X’: Champion of Pan-African liberation in his...

To mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of our “Black shining prince,” as Ossie Davis described Malcolm X in his eulogy, we highlight the 2013 book, “The Diary of Malcolm X,” by award-winning journalist Herb Boyd and Malcolm’s daughter, human rights activist and author Ilyasah Shabazz. The diary entries were compiled over two trips Malcolm made to Africa and the Middle East in 1964. He did not miss a single day. “It’s really beautiful that we get to see Malcolm in his own voice – without scholars, historians or observers saying what he was thinking or what he was doing or what he meant,” observed Ilyasah. “We get to read his personal diary.”

Malcolm and the music

El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Malcolm X), born 86 years ago on May 19, 1925, was loved by the oppressed and hated by the oppressors. Our “Black Shining Prince,” in the words of Ossie Davis, aimed to “use whatever means necessary to bring about a society in which the 22 million Afro-Americans are recognized and respected as human beings.” His influence is immeasurable - from music to foreign policy to religion. Today Islam, followed then by very few, is the second largest religion in the United States and Canada.

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‘Substance’: Black animator Jamaal Bradley speaks

Jamaal Bradley, an industry giant, is the former supervising animator at Dreamworks and has worked at various studios, including Walt Disney Animation, Sony Pictures Imageworks and Electronic Arts. He has been a senior animator on several Oscar-nominated films.

Eddie Africa of the #MOVE9 is home after four decades of...

The Abolitionist Law Center and the People’s Law Office are proud to announce that Eddie Africa of the MOVE 9 has been released from state custody after more than 40 years of incarceration.

Q&A wit’ ‘Good Kidd’ director Jamari Perry

“Good Kidd,"directed by Oakland native Jamari Perry, is a coming of age story that most young Black men from impoverished, drug ridden environments call their lives.