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Wednesday, February 26, 2020
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Tag: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Prison-assisted drug overdoses: Deadly K2 epidemic is spreading in Texas and...

The number of K2-related deaths in Texas prisons is mounting, year after year. Due to this drug being undetectable by prison drug-testing kits, it has become a favorite drug of choice for prisoners and prison officials who profit handsomely from smuggling it in. This has caused other common prison drugs, like cocaine, marijuana and meth, to be discarded by prisoners who now have the ability to get high without worrying about failing drug tests.

Sickle cell disease hits young Californians hard

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that can cause pain, anemia, infection and other serious health problems. As young people living with sickle cell disease (SCD) age, their health care needs change. This World Sickle Cell Day, observed each year on June 19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are providing special support to young adults living with SCD.

Healthy Hearts Campaign takes off in Bayview

“Healthy Hearts San Francisco” is a federally funded campaign designed to promote fitness opportunities for low income San Francisco residents in the African American and Latino communities. Health workers at the various city clinics offer physical activity prescriptions to people to take advantage of fitness classes, dieting and lifestyle changes, which help to promote healthier lifestyles.

Racism and African American men: Killing without a gun

Dr. Vickie M. Mays, a clinical psychologist and professor of health policy and management at UCLA, has published a number of studies showing how experiencing racism contributes to high morbidity and mortality in African Americans. Mays said she is concerned that not enough attention is paid to the lethal consequences of discrimination African American men face every day.

United States Ebola death raises questions about quality of care

There was a sense of shock and disbelief when news was released about the death of Thomas Eric Duncan on Oct. 8 at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. The Liberian-born 42-year-old was the first reported case of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) which emerged in the U.S. and resulted in death. Reports during the week of Oct. 6 mentioned that Duncan’s medical condition was worsening and that he was “fighting for his life.”

Understanding autism: African American children with autism are more likely to...

The diagnosis of autism, which affects a child’s ability to speak, learn and communicate with others, is on average made two years earlier in white children than Black children. In recognition of Autism Awareness Month, here are some early signs of autism to help families identify a need for early intervention and treatment.

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Strategies to reverse the out-migration of African Americans from San Francisco

Since the onslaught of the urban removal of African Americans from the Fillmore District by the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, the estimated 18 percent population of African Americans in the City has dropped to 3.5 percent. There are significant and shocking reasons why this has taken place. Below are strategies to correct some of the injustices and reverse this tragic out-migration.

Bay View Voters Guide for March 3 Primary Election

Our best chance at a bright future is Bernie Sanders​. We need the courage to vote​ for the best world possible, for the biggest dreams, for the biggest potential shift in government and politics.

Open Door Legal expands: Now nearly half of all low-income San...

San Francisco – Open Door Legal (ODL), a San Francisco non-profit committed to building the nation’s first system of universal access to legal help, has opened two new offices in the Excelsior and Fillmore-Western Addition neighborhoods. ODL was able to open the new legal aid centers thanks to a surge in funding by the City of San Francisco and is now halfway to achieving its vision in the city.

Some NJ officials lynch the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King...

New Jersey, the last Northern state to completely abolish slavery, became the first in America to approve a statewide anti-discrimination law.

Reframing Aging: San Franciscan Susie Tyner

If you live in San Francisco, you’ve probably seen her smiling face on billboards, the side of buildings, the back of buses, transit stations, and lining Van Ness and other major thoroughfares. Bayview resident Susie Tyner is one of five seniors who exemplify a new generation of older adults: accepting of the inevitable aging process but making a conscious decision to live full lives.