×

Sunday, August 1, 2021
Advertisement
Tags Frederick Douglass

Tag: Frederick Douglass

A narrative of two American slaves

Slavery by any other name . . .

RACISM-1619; The real killer virus

Society, like every other organism, is equipped with what it needs to fight infection.

Kwame Shakur: Letter to the People

Kwame Shakur skillfully documents an unfolding roadmap in revolutionary movement for self-determination, liberation and freedom building substance and solidarity among the people.

Vow of Silence

Imagine: 10,000 people protesting in silence. Consider a long moment; bring that possibility home and feel the power of it. Can protest actually be made louder by silence? Ronnie Lashan Winn uses silence to fight his fight for freedom. Conscious silence is not necessarily consent.

Commemorating our sacred Alkebulan-Afrikan Story

Emerging through the other side of the first month of 2021, Baba Jahahara Amen-RA Alkerbulan-Ma’at honors those transitioning to the realm of the Ancestors while bringing us into February and all that is to be appreciated, learned and embraced as the path of the movement demands. Revolutionary Love and Reparations Now!

Change the name of the ‘White’ House! Change this oppressive system!

As we transition between the trials and traumas of 2020 into the possibilities of hope and inspiration for 2021, Baba Jahahara remembers our new ancestors with honor, respect and love, notes the challenges ahead to infuse renewed energies into the call for reparations, Mother Earth love, freedom for our Political Prisoners and the new Biden-Harris administration’s debt to those who’s votes made the nightmare escape possible.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett is a sterling example for all incarcerated journalists

We know her name – Ida B. Wells-Barnett – but do we know how her very essence laid the groundwork for, and is woven deeply into the fabric of, today’s struggles? Uhuru B. Rowe, with elegance and expertise draws a powerful picture for our enlightenment about this profound human icon.

Prison Lives Matter is a united front

Mentored by Jalil Muntaqim, Kwame “Beans” Shakur describes the construct of the work ahead with Prison Lives Matter, “In the Spirit of Nelson Mandela,” to build unity, strength and international support in the movement to liberate all political prisoners, prisoners of war and politicized people caged by the U.S.

The master’s greatest fear: Unity and community equals real change

Rope, bullet or knee. Rand Gould gives us a clear and present opportunity to digest the story, the players and the possibilities, to take charge, to identify and build our communities to join the movement and feel the strength of unity to actualize the change we demand.

Finally! Baba Jalil will be freed!

We await release of imprisoned political leader Baba Jalil Muntaqim, hold honor for new ancestors, explore the road to reparations, bestow condemnations and congratulations on those who have earned such, reminder to Register and Vote, and wish for everyone safety and healing in the midst of capitalistic health rationing.

Black Votes Matter!

SF Bay View Editor, Mary Ratcliff, guides new Assistant and Managing Editors, Malik Washington and Nube Brown, and they have hit the ground running. Malik and Nube highlight the power and urgency of our vote, our Black vote, and their combined commitment to activate uplift, voice and change for people harmed by oppression.

Kevin Cooper: Surviving Death Row and COVID-19 in San Quentin

Kevin Cooper, still caged in San Quentin after 37 years, 35 years on Death Row, speaks with KPFA’s Flashpoints Dennis Bernstein in an exclusive in-depth interview. Cooper talks about simultaneously surviving Death Row and the COVID-19 pandemic, the blues and highlights the opportunity for Governor Gavin Newsom to order an Innocence Investigation, which will shine direct light on prosecutorial wrongdoings and new DNA evidence to support his innocence.

From ‘movement moments’ to change, from the Red Summer to Black...

It is said that Mark Twain once quipped that “history does not repeat itself, but it rhymes.” One cannot escape comparisons with 1968, and with widespread civil unrest, troops in the streets, warring abroad and a rabidly reactionary Republican president seeking re-election while executing his own Southern Strategy replete with dog-whistle appeals to “law and order,” such comparisons are not without merit.

Harriet as Igbo

by Biko Agozino This is not a spoiler. “Harriet” is a film without spoilers because the audience already can tell how the movie was going...

Lift Ev’ry Voice … and Act for Reparations Now!

May our Divine Mother-Father Creator of and in All – and Beloved Ancients and Ancestors from yesteryears and yesterdays – find you and (y)our extended Family in sacred Spirit, healing and thriving. WE are hoping to be in the magnificent presence of those of you around the Bay Area soon … possibly, at upcoming events like International Workers’ Day on 1 May (at the Port of Oakland); the 19th Annual MALCOLM X Jazz & Art Fest on 18 May (at San Antonio Park, Oakland); African Liberation Day on 25 May (in Oakland); and other venues. Asé.

‘He thinks he’s Black’

Since I became “woke” about the true level of racism and injustice in this country, it has become easier to recognize the proverbial “house negro.” One of them recently commented to another prisoner, “He thinks he’s Black,” referring to my constant defense of Black people and anti-racist views and loud comments about that racist pig in the White House. Of course, he didn’t say this to my face.

A celebration of the Justice for Oscar Grant protesters

Jan. 1, 2019, marks 10 years since the murder of Oscar Grant by BART police officer Johannes Mehserle. In the lead up to this grim anniversary, a number of articles, multimedia pieces, radio programs and television news segments have been produced to commemorate the occasion. Especially moving are those that give voice to Oscar’s family and friends. But it’s rare to see significant tribute paid to the fact that were it not for the vigor and relentlessness of protesters and activists, Oscar Grant would have received little to no justice.

Thank you, Brother Ron

He was our local Frederick Douglass. Even looked a bit like him: dashingly handsome, tall, strong, fierce, dedicated, educated, elegant and eloquent. And deeply rooted in the community. The former civil rights activist, mayor of Oakland and congressman, who put programs for the people ahead of war and weapons of mass destruction, the honorable and distinguished elder Ron Dellums joined the ancestors July 30, after making his presence felt on this planet for 82 years.

Stop the heartless racism on the border: Make justice and decency...

As both the political left and right decry the heartless immigration policy that is separating children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border, the white evangelical community is proving once again to be the taillight instead of the headline on issues of basic morality and justice. This is not the first time in U.S. history when those among us who most loudly cite from the Bible outright ignore or deny humanitarian crises.

The Parkland Arcane

Guns and money, --- Guns and money. --- This isn’t about --- Dempsey & Tunney. --- It’s about the religion --- of the very unfunny --- United States and the --- 17 dead in Parkland --- at the hands of Santa --- Cross* with that metallic --- white supremacist look, --- Saint Nikolas Cruz, who --- hates Jews, Blacks, and --- announced himself as --- a future school shooter --- even before he pulled --- the trigger, (go figger, --- niggas and kikes), --- it’s all about stukas, --- lugers and dykes;