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Friday, July 19, 2019
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Tag: Ivan Van Sertima

From traditional rhythms to knowledge of self

Miguel Gonalez is a Colombian man who teaches youth how to play the traditional African-Indiginous rhythms of our ancestors from all over Africa and the Americas, opening the door for children intellectually trapped in the system’s schools to develop a knowledge of self, with the first steps being through playing the heartbeat, the drums. His organization, New Urban Drum Culture, is unique in its approach in helping to build self-esteem in at-risk inner-city youth.

When will the truth be told? The Black presence in America...

Every October, Americans pause to celebrate Columbus Day. Children are taught that the Italian navigator discovered America. Parades are held in his honor and tributes tell of his skill, courage and perseverance. Historians, archeologists, anthropologists and other scientists and scholars now know that Columbus did not discover America. Of the various people who reached America before Columbus, Black Africans appear to have been the first.

‘The Black Woman Is God’ – Part II

Afrikan history is world history. World history is human history. And the Black Woman Is God. “The Black Woman Is God” exhibit is a continuation of great Afrikan thought, not solely an outstanding new work of collective and individual art. The closing reception is Thursday, May 30, 6 p.m., in the Sargent Johnson Gallery, African-American Arts and Culture Complex, 762 Fulton St., San Francisco

The rich heritage of Africa in the West

"The ever-present propaganda campaign of white superiority and Black inferiority, since slavery, has succeeded in rewriting history without its African roots and has continued to downplay Africa’s contribution to civilization and to the world as we know it. If Africa were more effectively promoted as the birthplace of civilization and the beginning source of all sophisticated culture, the myth of Black inferiority would be forced out of society because it would then be evident that we are all connected and, ultimately, all African." – DeBray Carpenter, aka Fly Benzo

Remembering Geronimo

Political activists around the country are still absorbing the news of Geronimo ji Jaga’s death. His commitment, humility, clear thinking as well as his sense of both the longevity and continuity of the Black Freedom Movement in the U.S. all stood out to those who knew him.

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Blow the whistle! How the wheels fell off the Warriors’ dynasty

Oakland is going to miss those million fan parties and victory parades when you crowned the whole town with championship trophies and jubilation! But hey, you gave us a great run while it lasted!

Reparations now! Pass HR 40!

Broaden this opening to envision the reparations we need to fully repair and heal African nations and people and increase the participation of our people in making our desperately needed reparations a reality – now!

Spotlight: Kevin Cooper’s case exemplifies decades of systemic failures

Not everyone caught in the criminal legal system prompts backsliding on reform, and not everyone is hit with high-profile murder charges. Not everyone is framed. And very few have Kim Kardashian fighting for them.

Heat-related conditions at the Allred Unit are cruel, unusual and a...

“Heat illness is a very serious matter in Texas prisons. I am a living witness to these conditions and many other unjust and cruel things that occur daily in Texas state prisons.”

It’s not ‘try to get justice’ no more; we WILL get...

When my feet first touched down in the streets of Ferguson, I felt connected suddenly, because I felt the pain of the people out there. I felt what was going on with them, and I did not want to leave.