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Sunday, August 18, 2019
Tags Library of Congress

Tag: Library of Congress

Medicare and Medicaid, a major gift of the Civil Rights movement

I recently finished reading David Barton Smith’s book, “The Power to Heal, Civil Rights, Medicare, and the Struggle to Transform America’s Health Care System.” It is an excellent history of healthcare in the United States, particularly in the 1950s and ‘60s. For me, as a longtime Medicare for All advocate, the book also provided insight about our continuing struggle to achieve better healthcare in the U.S. at a lower cost for everyone.

Gordon Parks, genius at work

Gordon Roger Alexander Buchanan Parks (1912 – 2006), pre-eminent photographer, musician, activist, filmmaker and writer, would have been 103 years old this year. This is not as outlandish a figure as it might seem, given that there have recently been a flood of centenarians living well into the turn of the next century. But did you know that he was born dead? Watch the wonderful documentary, “Half Past Autumn: The Life and work of Gordon Parks,” to find out more!

Wanda’s Picks for July 2015

Libations to Ornette Coleman, musician, composer, March 9, 1930-June 11, 2015. Libations also for Brother Tahuti, a beloved elder who made his transition mid-June. Those of us who commemorate our African Ancestors of the Middle Passage have formed an organization which took me recently to Washington, D.C. At the website guests can learn about commemorations throughout the United States and beyond.

Ten things you should know about Selma before you see the...

This brief introduction to Selma’s bottom up history can help students and others learn valuable lessons for today. As SNCC veteran and filmmaker Judy Richardson said: “If we don’t learn that it was people just like us – our mothers, our uncles, our classmates, our clergy – who made and sustained the modern Civil Rights Movement, then we won’t know we can do it again. And then the other side wins – even before we ever begin the fight.”

James Baldwin’s visit to Bayview Hunters Point: Racism, censorship and a...

In the summer of 1963, the KQED Film Unit invited author James Baldwin to investigate racism in San Francisco. Baldwin agreed to be filmed while he scrutinized the liberal, cosmopolitan image projected by the city. Before “Take This Hammer” was televised, KQED’s Board of Directors insisted that 15 minutes of footage had to be removed, which some felt portrayed race relations in an overly negative way.

Latest News

New felony murder rule results in justice 16 years later

“The felony murder rule used to cast a wide net when pursuing convictions, without requiring prosecutors to look more closely at the evidence ... This man has been in prison for 16 years for being a passenger in a car.”

‘A Lifetime of Being Betty (Reid Soskin)’ CD release party Saturday,...

“A Lifetime of Being Betty,” to be released Aug. 17 at Freight and Salvage in Berkeley, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance, $24 at the door. Visit www.thefreight.org/event/1858290-little-village-foundation-berkeley/.

#HugosSoWhite: The literary convention diversity scandals

When there aren’t enough Black folks doing the writing, Black characters are written by white writers with all the inherent biases.

Hit me, Bruh! Thoughts on ‘The Last Black Man in San...

“Do you love it? You don’t get to hate San Francisco unless you love it.”

People’s Power stops a modern-day lynching

A massive phone protest by people from around the world and calls for direct protests forced the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections to back down from carrying out the state’s latest attempt to kill MOVE 9 member Delbert Orr Africa.