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Tag: prison gang members

‘May your spirit be with us’: Prisoners recall Comrade Hugo ‘Yogi’...

This photo of Hugo “Yogi” Pinell was taken in the New Folsom visiting room in early 2014, when he was first released from the Pelican Bay SHU. Derek Anderson says of this man who was a hero and role model to fellow prisoners, “He made it possible for us to walk with our heads held high in this wilderness.”

California prisoners launch new hunger strike to protest solitary confinement

Hundreds of people held in California prisons are expected to launch their third large-scale hunger strike in two years today. The current strike, announced by leaders at Pelican Bay State Prison on Feb. 14, is seen as a resumption of the large-scale strikes in June and September 2011, when thousands of prisoners across the state stopped eating for days or weeks in order to press for the five demands laid out by the strike organizers.

Report from the Pelican Bay SHU Short Corridor Representatives: Continued ignoring...

It has been more than 13 months since we agreed to suspend our non-violent, peaceful protest hunger strike actions in response to CDCR’s top administrators’ admissions that all of our Five Core Demands were reasonable and would be responded to via substantively meaningful changes to the policies and practices at issue. This has NOT HAPPENED.

Death Row prisoner Steve Champion, Tookie’s friend, on hunger strike since...

Word has just reached us that Steve Champion, a prisoner on San Quentin’s death row well known as an inspirational advocate for justice and as one of the trio with Stanley Tookie Williams and Anthony Ross, began a hunger strike last Thursday, Oct. 4. His demands – still unmet – are listed in “The struggle never stops,” published in the July Bay View and reprinted here, and he asks that all who believe in justice flood the San Quentin warden and Corrections Department (CDCR) spokespersons with calls and emails.

The struggle never stops

Unlike Title 15 – California’s Code of Regulations for all California prisoners – San Quentin top officials have concocted and enacted an exclusive code of regulations called the 608s, which mandate that death row prisoners are under the control of the warden of San Quentin. It is this illegal and repressive code of regulations that AC death row prisoners are vigorously challenging.

Hunger striker dies mysteriously at Calipatria, family reports funeral is Tuesday,...

Evidence indicates Hozel Blanchard's death wasn’t a suicide. J. Turner, Hozel's brother, saw this article and reports that services will be held Tuesday, Nov. 22, 11 a.m., at the Miraculous Word Christian Center, 2723 San Pablo Ave., Oakland. The family seeks “any information or advice you can provide for us to get justice for my brother. We also have an email set up solely for this purpose: hozelblanchard@gmail.com. Any information would be greatly appreciated ... to get to the bottom of this tragedy.”

Pelican Bay threatens hunger strikers

It is a historical truth that repression breeds resistance, which is why we prisoners at Pelican Bay State Prison’s SHU/CMU units took the initiative to come together and go on a hunger strike in order to say to our oppressors that ...

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OneUnited Bank announces 9th annual ‘I Got Bank’ Youth Financial Literacy...

Teri Williams, owner of OneUnited Bank, the largest Black-owned bank in America, and author of “I Got Bank,” encourages young folks to enter this year’s contest.

‘Substance’: Black animator Jamaal Bradley speaks

Jamaal Bradley, an industry giant, is the former supervising animator at Dreamworks and has worked at various studios, including Walt Disney Animation, Sony Pictures Imageworks and Electronic Arts. He has been a senior animator on several Oscar-nominated films.

Eddie Africa of the #MOVE9 is home after four decades of...

The Abolitionist Law Center and the People’s Law Office are proud to announce that Eddie Africa of the MOVE 9 has been released from state custody after more than 40 years of incarceration.