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Posts Tagged with "New York Times"

The mass incarceration of the Black community: an interview with Michelle Alexander, author of ‘The New Jim Crow’

April 4, 2012

Professor Michelle Alexander’s new book “The New Jim Crow” is a monumental, well researched piece of work that presents documented facts in down to earth English about the mass incarceration of Black people within the United States’ national concentration camp system. At one point in “The New Jim Crow,” Professor Alexander presents evidence that more Black people are enslaved behind bars today than were enslaved on the plantations in 1850, before the Emancipation Proclamation was signed.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Congo deserves a leader who cares about the Congolese people

December 1, 2011

Why are the international community and U.N. not calling out irregularities in the elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo? Why are they pretending to ignore this election in the world’s most resource rich nation, with the world’s lowest standard of living and the highest death toll due to armed conflict since World War II?

Libya: Tawergha, city of Blacks, depopulated – Rep. Jesse Jackson calls for investigation of ‘crimes against humanity’

September 15, 2011

Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., reacting to reports in The Wall Street Journal, has called for an investigation by the International Criminal Court into the reported killings of Black Libyans in the city of Tawergha.

Attica Solidarity Statement from the San Quentin Six

September 8, 2011

We have just finished commemorating the 40th anniversary of the assassination of our beloved Comrade George Jackson. Not forgotten by us was the horrific massacre perpetrated by the state of New York at Attica. At the time, we were in the adjustment center at San Quentin mourning our loss and recovering from the brutality inflicted upon us in the aftermath of the Aug. 21 incident when the state murdered our comrade.

1971: Attica prison rebellion

September 8, 2011

Against the background of the mass revolutionary Black power and prisoners’ movements in the U.S., a four day revolt began on Sept. 13, 1971, at the Attica Correctional Facility near Buffalo, N.Y. Its repression killed 39 people. When George Jackson, Black Panther and political prisoner, was murdered at San Quentin by the guards on Aug. 21, 1971, his book “Soledad Brother” was being passed from prisoner to prisoner and tensions were running mounting. A prisoners’ rights movement was growing.

Katrina Pain Index 2011: Race, gender, poverty

September 7, 2011

Six years ago, Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf coast. The impact of Katrina and government bungling continue to inflict major pain on the people left behind. It is impossible to understand what happened and what still remains without considering race, gender and poverty. The following offer some hints of what remains.

Libya: Colonialism lives!

September 2, 2011

So now in addition to Afghanistan and Iraq, we have Libya, thanks to U.S. President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Barack Obama, British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicholas Sarkozy. No other three countries – and leaders – in the world could today commit the crime of abusing United Nations resolutions to wage a war of aggression against a sovereign country …

Six years after Katrina, the battle for New Orleans continues

September 1, 2011

As this weekend’s storm has reminded us, hurricanes can be a threat to U.S. cities on the East Coast as well the Gulf. But the vast changes that have taken place in New Orleans since Katrina have had little to do with weather and everything to do with political struggles.

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Filed Under: New Orleans
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Locked up and left behind: New York’s prisoners and Hurricane Irene

August 27, 2011

“We are not evacuating Rikers Island,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said in a news conference Friday afternoon. Bloomberg annouced a host of extreme measures being taken by New York City in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Irene, including a shutdown of the public transit system and the unprecedented mandatory evacuation of some 250,000 people from low-lying areas.

The truth about the situation in Libya

August 24, 2011

Libya is a small country of just over 6 million people, but it possesses the largest oil reserves in all of Africa. The oil produced there is especially coveted because of its particularly high quality. The Air Force of the United States along with Britain and France has carried out 7,459 bombing attacks since March 19. Britain, France and the United States sent special operation ground forces and commando units to direct the military operations of the so-called rebel fighters – it is a NATO-led army in the field.

Hunger strike updates: Legislative hearing on Pelican Bay SHU tomorrow in Sacramento

August 22, 2011

The Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity coalition will hold a press conference Tuesday, Aug. 23, 11:00 a.m. at the California Capitol Building in Sacramento where families of prisoners, community members and activists from around California will converge to rally and participate …

Congo: Let’s be frank about Dodd-Frank

August 19, 2011

Dodd-Frank and its proponents penalize the people of eastern Congo but do little to curtail the militias and their backers. Congress should confront the real causes of the conflict, which are failed leadership and corruption in Congo’s capital, Kinshasa, and predatory policies of Rwanda and Uganda, which destabilize eastern Congo while benefiting from the mineral trade.

From heroes to villains: NOPD verdict reveals post-Katrina history

August 12, 2011

In an historic verdict with national implications, five New Orleans police officers were convicted on Friday of civil rights violations for killing unarmed African Americans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and could face life in prison when sentenced later this year.

Rwanda: Colonizing Eastern Congo with U.S. support

July 30, 2011

KPFA Weekend News Anchor Cameron Jones: The secession of South Sudan rekindled calls for secession around the world, including those of the Rwandan lobby for redrawing the map to make the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s North and South Kivu provinces on Congo’s eastern border with Rwanda part of Rwanda.

Ethnic cleansing of Black Libyans

July 25, 2011

The “rebels” in Misrata in Libya have driven out the entire Black population of the city, according to a chilling story in the Wall Street Journal … The “rebels” now eye the city of Tawergha, 25 miles away, and vow to cleanse it of all Black people once they seize the city. Isn’t this the perfect definition of the term “genocide”?

A defining moment for Africa: North Atlantic terrorists will be defeated in Libya

July 25, 2011

The argument in Libya has been won by the Al Fateh revolution. There is now a glaring truth confronting the North Atlantic Terrorist Organization (NATO) – Muammar Qaddafi has handed out over 1 million kalashnikovs to the Libyan people. If he was the brutal dictator that NATO would have us believe him to be …

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Rethinking Malcolm: What was Marable thinking?

July 8, 2011

The new book by Manning Marable, “Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention,” will help us to get a deeper understanding of Malcolm X and the times we’re living in now. This will not be a direct result of what Marable has done, but rather of what needs to happen now because of what he has done.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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WikiLeaks: Haiti’s elite tried to turn the police into a private army

July 1, 2011

Leading members of Haiti’s bourgeoisie tried to turn the Haitian police force into their own private army, according to a secret U.S. Embassy cable provided to Haïti Liberté by the media organization WikiLeaks.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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New Orleans police violence trial begins

June 29, 2011

Opening arguments begin today in what observers have called the most important trial New Orleans has seen in a generation. It is a shocking case of police brutality that has already redefined this city’s relationship to its police department and radically rewritten the official narrative of what happened in the chaotic days after Hurricane Katrina.

Cynthia McKinney: We are now under attack in Tripoli!

June 7, 2011

It is now 1:10 in the afternoon and as the daily life in Tripoli unfolds that includes teachers, staff and children at school, shopkeepers working in their businesses, streetsweepers sweeping the streets, people moving to and fro in cars, on bicycles and on foot, Tripoli has thus far since around 11:00 up to now, received at least 29 bombs. These bombs and missiles are not falling in empty spaces. Tripoli is a major metropolitan city of about 2 million people.

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