Mansour Id-Deen of the Berkeley NAACP speaks on Barbara Lee funding 18 new cops

by The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey

Mansour Id-Deen heads the Berkley NAACP. – Photo: Berkeleyside
Mansour Id-Deen heads the Berkley NAACP. – Photo: Berkeleyside

Mansour Id-Deen speaks wit’ The People’s Minister of Information JR about the Berkeley police stopping Black motorists at a disproportionate rate in violation of our human rights. “The disparity is unbelievable,” says Id-Deen. Blacks are stopped more and often “for no reason.”

We also speak about “progressive” Congresswoman Barbara Lee securing over $2 million to hire 18 police officers in her district, which includes Berkeley and Oakland. She needs to pay “more attention to local issues and have conversations with local leaders,” Id-Deen says, to make “a better decision.”

The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey is associate editor of the Bay View, author of “Block Reportin’” and “Unfinished Business: Block Reportin’ 2” and filmmaker of “Operation Small Axe” and “Block Reportin’ 101,” available, along with many more interviews, at www.blockreportradio.com. He can be reached at blockreportradio@gmail.com.

Mansour Id-Deen of the Berkeley NAACP, left, with representatives of Berkeley Copwatch and the UC Berkeley Black Student Union present racial profiling data to the Berkeley Police Department on Sept. 29, 2015. The three, part of a coalition that also includes the National Lawyers Guild, the Peace and Justice Commission and the ACLU, analyzed nearly seven months of data on about 4,700 traffic stops, finding that 30.5 percent involved Black motorists, whereas the Black population, according to Id-Deen, is close to 5 percent. Berkeleyside reports, “Id-Deen said the coalition believes the traffic stop data is evidence of ‘illegal patterns and practices by some members of the Berkeley Police Department’ that give weight to concerns expressed by people of color ‘for a very, very long time here in Berkeley’ about racial profiling and over-policing.” – Photo: Emilie Raguso, Berkeleyside
Mansour Id-Deen of the Berkeley NAACP, left, with representatives of Berkeley Copwatch and the UC Berkeley Black Student Union present racial profiling data to the Berkeley Police Department on Sept. 29, 2015. The three, part of a coalition that also includes the National Lawyers Guild, the Peace and Justice Commission and the ACLU, analyzed nearly seven months of data on about 4,700 traffic stops, finding that 30.5 percent involved Black motorists, whereas the Black population, according to Id-Deen, is close to 5 percent. Berkeleyside reports, “Id-Deen said the coalition believes the traffic stop data is evidence of ‘illegal patterns and practices by some members of the Berkeley Police Department’ that give weight to concerns expressed by people of color ‘for a very, very long time here in Berkeley’ about racial profiling and over-policing.” – Photo: Emilie Raguso, Berkeleyside