Sunday, October 24, 2021
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Tags African American community

Tag: African American community

Is the glass half full or half empty?

Positive Directions Equals Change explores the issues around substance addiction and changes like committed funding and humanity-based vision towards alternative equity-based solutions to serve the underserved in the African American community.

BOS President Shamann Walton leads Reparations plan for Black San Franciscans!

SF BOS takes huge historical step in creating the 15-member African American Reparations Advisory Committee.

Black farmers hail $5 billion in COVID relief to redress generations...

Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! explores fourth-generation Black farmer John Boyd’s 30-years-in-the-making victory of $5 billion COVID relief for Black farmers as part of the American Rescue Plan. Also addressed is the egregious historical USDA racial discrimination in lending, resulting in the crushing decline of Black farming with 90 percent of Black farmers’ land lost over the past century.

Pervis Payne remains on death row despite DNA evidence, new date...

To writer Sumiko Saulson, who still has their humanity intact, and to the Innocence Project, the story and path of Pervis Payne appears clear – he has been wrongly convicted and sentenced to be executed, although new DNA testing has not revealed his DNA on the weapon and he has intellectual disability. In the U.S. it is illegal for the state to execute Pervis under these conditions, but the state is going ahead anyway – because they want to, and who is going to stop them?

The battle to free San Francisco Bayview Editor Malik Washington

The appetite of capitalism demands every dollar be extracted from the resource object, in this case, your new community advocate and editor of the SF Bay View Newspaper, Malik Washington, is the commodity, the enemy and still a prisoner in the grip of the multi-billion dollar GEO Group that runs the Taylor Center halfway house/private prison in the Tenderloin. Free Malik Washington!

U.S. Congressman Jim Clyburn says Gov. Newsom must appoint Black woman...

U.S. Congressman Jim Clyburn publicly urges Gov. Gavin Newsom to appoint a Black woman to fill the Senate seat vacated by Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris, saying a Black woman is essential to the Senate and that Congresswomen Barbara Lee and Karen Bass are excellent choices.

Brenda Kittrell (1955-2020): Advocate for public housing community, #BlackLivesMatter and scrutinizing...

As gentrification continues to gobble up the streets of San Francisco, Brenda Kittrell (1955-2020) is remembered as a well loved and respected member of the Potrero Hill community. She advocated tirelessly for public housing, safety and community on local state and national levels and supported the possibility of home ownership for low-income African Americans living in San Francisco.

Community leader Carolyn Saulson passes

Carolyn Saulson (Feb. 24, 1948 – Jan. 14, 2019) passed away after a long battle with cancer at the age of 70. A resident of Berkeley, California, she was the board president and a founder of Iconoclast Productions, a Bay Area media arts non-profit serving the Black community. Homegoing services will be held at the Chapel of the Chimes, 4499 Piedmont Ave., Oakland, CA 94611 – quiet reflection on Monday, Feb. 4, 3-5 p.m., and funeral service Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2-4 p.m.

Legacy Home Loans to help increase African American homeownership

Alterra Home Loans, one of the largest minority-owned mortgage companies in the U.S. and a national mortgage lender focused on serving underserved markets, announced today that its Legacy Division will be renamed Legacy Home Loans, and it will remain under the direction of President Ben Slayton. The new name is designed to focus more on the company’s mission, Slayton said.

Digital boom and tech access fuel Black entrepreneurship

No different than the impact industry had on America’s business model of the early 20th century, new technological innovations have significantly changed all aspects of business, from the way people consume to how brands engage consumers. “We are on the threshold of a new business paradigm,” said Cheryl Grace, senior vice president of U.S. Strategic Community Alliances and Consumer Engagement at Nielsen. “The digital age is transforming not only commerce and the relationship consumers have with companies, but digital know-how among consumers – particularly African Americans – is fostering new levels of independence and financial freedom.”

Money changes situations: an interview wit’ financial advisor Kendra Willis

We all love to spend money, but how many of us have learned how to effectivily save for a rainy day, college, a business or retirement? Many of us have spent more time watching TV in our lives than planning for our family’s financial future. Many of us don’t like to talk about these things because we’re embarrassed we don’t know much about financial literacy, investing and saving money properly. Check out financial advisor Kendra Willis in her own words.

Supervisors President London Breed joins city leaders in announcing first-in-the-nation legislation...

President London Breed today joined City leaders and community advocates in announcing groundbreaking legislation that will eliminate all existing criminal justice fees within the City and County of San Francisco’s jurisdiction. This includes fees related to adult probation, home detention, alcohol testing and others which are ​levied on individuals coming into and out of the City’s criminal justice system.

NFL ‘Blackout’ for Kaepernick

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick still doesn’t have a job with the NFL. However, the protest he began by kneeling during the national anthem at last season’s games keeps growing. A group of Black community leaders and pastors have announced an NFL “BlackOut” unless and until Colin Kaepernick is signed to play with an NFL team. They introduced their movement in a YouTube video.

‘Harlem of the West – The San Francisco Fillmore Jazz Era’:...

From May through August, three floors of black and white jazz photographs are on display at the African American Art & Culture Complex. They depict Harlem of the West, the San Francisco Fillmore jazz era that was bustling from the 1930s through the 1950s. Jazz was “king” and the Fillmore music scene was alive and flowing from end to end in the African American community.

What does menthol have to do with it? Everything! Tobacco and...

The African American Tobacco Control Leadership Council (AATCLC), a nonprofit consortium of organizations dedicated to research, community collaboration and public engagement, is working to stop the preventable deaths of African Americans due to the consumption of menthol-flavored cigarettes engineered by the tobacco companies to addict Black people and others including Asian, Latino and LGBTQ populations.

Fillmore Heritage Center up for sale

The Fillmore Heritage Center, considered to be the last vestige of Black culture in the Fillmore District, once known as the “Harlem of the West,” has been put up for sale. The Request for Proposals (RFP) by the City and County of San Francisco was issued on Feb. 10, 2017. The property, located at Fillmore and Eddy Streets, previously housed Yoshi’s San Francisco restaurant, Yoshi’s Jazz Club, the 1300 Restaurant, a jazz art gallery and a theater. The minimum bid is $6.5 million.

Black contractors lose their shirts on Shipyard project

When SF’s top officials gathered for the annual State of the City address on the morning of Jan. 17, 2014, instead of the elegant environs of City Hall, they descended on a construction site at the Hunters Point Shipyard. Despite the rosy picture painted by the mayor, some of the people working at the Shipyard were on their way to losing everything. The program meant to help small local construction companies benefit from the development was instead driving some against the wall. A survey of the Shipyard’s local contractors and a review of public documents reveal systemic issues with the local builders program.

HUD policies threaten poor, elderly and disabled tenants with eviction

A proposal by HUD and the Obama administration that is allegedly meant to combat segregation and break up concentrations of poverty actually threatens Section 8 renters (Housing Choice Voucher holders) – the elderly, poor and disabled – with higher rents and eviction. It has many Section 8 tenants worried about their future in the Bay Area, New York and elsewhere.

Katrina Pain Index 2016: Race and class gap widening

Hurricane Katrina hit 11 years ago. Population of the City of New Orleans is down by over 95,000 people. Almost all this loss of people is in the African American community. The gap between rich and poor in New Orleans is massive, the largest in the country. Despite receiving $76 billion in assistance after Katrina, it is clear that poor and working people in New Orleans, especially African Americans, got very little of that help. Here are the numbers.

LA’s Black Leimert Park Village Book Fair celebrates its 10th year

The Leimert Park Village Book Fair is held in the well preserved and nationally known Los Angeles Black artistic and cultural neighborhood Leimert Park, home to legendary filmmaker and owner of the Kaos Network Ben Caldwell and the Black bookstore Eso Won Books. Cynthia Exum and her crew have been organizing the Leimert Park Village Book Fair for a decade, which is no small feat. So I sat down with her to discuss this monumental accomplishment.
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